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1998 Minnesota Statutes

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116.07 Powers and duties.

Subdivision 1. Generally. In addition to any powers or duties otherwise prescribed by law and without limiting the same, the pollution control agency shall have the powers and duties hereinafter specified.

Subd. 2. Adoption of standards. The pollution control agency shall improve air quality by promoting, in the most practicable way possible, the use of energy sources and waste disposal methods which produce or emit the least air contaminants consistent with the agency's overall goal of reducing all forms of pollution. The agency shall also adopt standards of air quality, including maximum allowable standards of emission of air contaminants from motor vehicles, recognizing that due to variable factors, no single standard of purity of air is applicable to all areas of the state. In adopting standards the pollution control agency shall give due recognition to the fact that the quantity or characteristics of air contaminants or the duration of their presence in the atmosphere, which may cause air pollution in one area of the state, may cause less or not cause any air pollution in another area of the state, and it shall take into consideration in this connection such factors, including others which it may deem proper, as existing physical conditions, zoning classifications, topography, prevailing wind directions and velocities, and the fact that a standard of air quality which may be proper as to an essentially residential area of the state, may not be proper as to a highly developed industrial area of the state. Such standards of air quality shall be premised upon scientific knowledge of causes as well as effects based on technically substantiated criteria and commonly accepted practices. No local government unit shall set standards of air quality which are more stringent than those set by the pollution control agency.

The pollution control agency shall promote solid waste disposal control by encouraging the updating of collection systems, elimination of open dumps, and improvements in incinerator practices. The agency shall also adopt standards for the control of the collection, transportation, storage, processing, and disposal of solid waste and sewage sludge for the prevention and abatement of water, air, and land pollution, recognizing that due to variable factors, no single standard of control is applicable to all areas of the state. In adopting standards, the pollution control agency shall give due recognition to the fact that elements of control which may be reasonable and proper in densely populated areas of the state may be unreasonable and improper in sparsely populated or remote areas of the state, and it shall take into consideration in this connection such factors, including others which it may deem proper, as existing physical conditions, topography, soils and geology, climate, transportation, and land use. Such standards of control shall be premised on technical criteria and commonly accepted practices.

The pollution control agency shall also adopt standards describing the maximum levels of noise in terms of sound pressure level which may occur in the outdoor atmosphere, recognizing that due to variable factors no single standard of sound pressure is applicable to all areas of the state. Such standards shall give due consideration to such factors as the intensity of noises, the types of noises, the frequency with which noises recur, the time period for which noises continue, the times of day during which noises occur, and such other factors as could affect the extent to which noises may be injurious to human health or welfare, animal or plant life, or property, or could interfere unreasonably with the enjoyment of life or property. In adopting standards, the pollution control agency shall give due recognition to the fact that the quantity or characteristics of noise or the duration of its presence in the outdoor atmosphere, which may cause noise pollution in one area of the state, may cause less or not cause any noise pollution in another area of the state, and it shall take into consideration in this connection such factors, including others which it may deem proper, as existing physical conditions, zoning classifications, topography, meteorological conditions and the fact that a standard which may be proper in an essentially residential area of the state, may not be proper as to a highly developed industrial area of the state. Such noise standards shall be premised upon scientific knowledge as well as effects based on technically substantiated criteria and commonly accepted practices. No local governing unit shall set standards describing the maximum levels of sound pressure which are more stringent than those set by the pollution control agency.

The pollution control agency shall adopt standards for the identification of hazardous waste and for the management, identification, labeling, classification, storage, collection, transportation, processing, and disposal of hazardous waste, recognizing that due to variable factors, a single standard of hazardous waste control may not be applicable to all areas of the state. In adopting standards, the pollution control agency shall recognize that elements of control which may be reasonable and proper in densely populated areas of the state may be unreasonable and improper in sparsely populated or remote areas of the state. The agency shall consider existing physical conditions, topography, soils, and geology, climate, transportation and land use. Standards of hazardous waste control shall be premised on technical knowledge, and commonly accepted practices. No local government unit shall set standards of hazardous waste control which are in conflict or inconsistent with those set by the pollution control agency.

A person who generates less than 100 kilograms of hazardous waste per month is exempt from the agency hazardous waste rules relating to transportation, manifesting, storage, and labeling for photographic fixer and X-ray negative wastes that are hazardous solely because of silver content. Nothing in this paragraph exempts the generator from the agency's rules relating to on-site accumulation or outdoor storage. A political subdivision or other local unit of government may not adopt management requirements that are more restrictive than this paragraph.

Subd. 2a. Exemptions from standards. No standards adopted by any state agency for limiting levels of noise in terms of sound pressure which may occur in the outdoor atmosphere shall apply to (1) segments of trunk highways constructed with federal interstate substitution money, provided that all reasonably available noise mitigation measures are employed to abate noise, (2) an existing or newly constructed segment of a highway, provided that all reasonably available noise mitigation measures, as approved by the commissioners of the department of transportation and pollution control agency, are employed to abate noise, (3) except for the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, an existing or newly constructed segment of a road, street, or highway under the jurisdiction of a road authority of a town, statutory or home rule charter city, or county, except for roadways for which full control of access has been acquired, (4) skeet, trap or shooting sports clubs, or (5) motor vehicle race events conducted at a facility specifically designed for that purpose that was in operation on or before July 1, 1983. Nothing herein shall prohibit a local unit of government or a public corporation with the power to make rules for the government of its real property from regulating the location and operation of skeet, trap or shooting sports clubs, or motor vehicle race events conducted at a facility specifically designed for that purpose that was in operation on or before July 1, 1983.

Subd. 3. Administrative rules. Pursuant and subject to the provisions of chapter 14, and the provisions hereof, the pollution control agency may adopt, amend, and rescind rules governing its own administration and procedure and its staff and employees.

Subd. 4. Rules and standards. Pursuant and subject to the provisions of chapter 14, and the provisions hereof, the pollution control agency may adopt, amend and rescind rules and standards having the force of law relating to any purpose within the provisions of Laws 1967, chapter 882, for the prevention, abatement, or control of air pollution. Any such rule or standard may be of general application throughout the state, or may be limited as to times, places, circumstances, or conditions in order to make due allowance for variations therein. Without limitation, rules or standards may relate to sources or emissions of air contamination or air pollution, to the quality or composition of such emissions, or to the quality of or composition of the ambient air or outdoor atmosphere or to any other matter relevant to the prevention, abatement, or control of air pollution.

Pursuant and subject to the provisions of chapter 14, and the provisions hereof, the pollution control agency may adopt, amend, and rescind rules and standards having the force of law relating to any purpose within the provisions of Laws 1969, chapter 1046, for the collection, transportation, storage, processing, and disposal of solid waste and the prevention, abatement, or control of water, air, and land pollution which may be related thereto, and the deposit in or on land of any other material that may tend to cause pollution. The agency shall adopt such rules and standards for sewage sludge, addressing the intrinsic suitability of land, the volume and rate of application of sewage sludge of various degrees of intrinsic hazard, design of facilities, and operation of facilities and sites. Any such rule or standard may be of general application throughout the state or may be limited as to times, places, circumstances, or conditions in order to make due allowance for variations therein. Without limitation, rules or standards may relate to collection, transportation, processing, disposal, equipment, location, procedures, methods, systems or techniques or to any other matter relevant to the prevention, abatement or control of water, air, and land pollution which may be advised through the control of collection, transportation, processing, and disposal of solid waste and sewage sludge, and the deposit in or on land of any other material that may tend to cause pollution. By January 1, 1983, the rules for the management of sewage sludge shall include an analysis of the sewage sludge determined by the commissioner of agriculture to be necessary to meet the soil amendment labeling requirements of section 18C.215.

Pursuant and subject to the provisions of chapter 14, and the provisions hereof, the pollution control agency may adopt, amend and rescind rules and standards having the force of law relating to any purpose within the provisions of Laws 1971, chapter 727, for the prevention, abatement, or control of noise pollution. Any such rule or standard may be of general application throughout the state, or may be limited as to times, places, circumstances or conditions in order to make due allowances for variations therein. Without limitation, rules or standards may relate to sources or emissions of noise or noise pollution, to the quality or composition of noises in the natural environment, or to any other matter relevant to the prevention, abatement, or control of noise pollution.

As to any matters subject to this chapter, local units of government may set emission regulations with respect to stationary sources which are more stringent than those set by the pollution control agency.

Pursuant to chapter 14, the pollution control agency may adopt, amend, and rescind rules and standards having the force of law relating to any purpose within the provisions of this chapter for generators of hazardous waste, the management, identification, labeling, classification, storage, collection, treatment, transportation, processing, and disposal of hazardous waste and the location of hazardous waste facilities. A rule or standard may be of general application throughout the state or may be limited as to time, places, circumstances, or conditions. In implementing its hazardous waste rules, the pollution control agency shall give high priority to providing planning and technical assistance to hazardous waste generators. The agency shall assist generators in investigating the availability and feasibility of both interim and long-term hazardous waste management methods. The methods shall include waste reduction, waste separation, waste processing, resource recovery, and temporary storage.

The pollution control agency shall give highest priority in the consideration of permits to authorize disposal of diseased shade trees by open burning at designated sites to evidence concerning economic costs of transportation and disposal of diseased shade trees by alternative methods.

Subd. 4a. Permits. (a) The pollution control agency may issue, continue in effect or deny permits, under such conditions as it may prescribe for the prevention of pollution, for the emission of air contaminants, or for the installation or operation of any emission facility, air contaminant treatment facility, treatment facility, potential air contaminant storage facility, or storage facility, or any part thereof, or for the sources or emissions of noise pollution.

The pollution control agency may also issue, continue in effect or deny permits, under such conditions as it may prescribe for the prevention of pollution, for the storage, collection, transportation, processing, or disposal of waste, or for the installation or operation of any system or facility, or any part thereof, related to the storage, collection, transportation, processing, or disposal of waste.

The pollution control agency may revoke or modify any permit issued under this subdivision and section 116.081 whenever it is necessary, in the opinion of the agency, to prevent or abate pollution.

(b) The pollution control agency has the authority for approval over the siting, expansion, or operation of a solid waste facility with regard to environmental issues. However, the agency's issuance of a permit does not release the permittee from any liability, penalty, or duty imposed by any applicable county ordinances. Nothing in this chapter precludes, or shall be construed to preclude, a county from enforcing land use controls, regulations, and ordinances existing at the time of the permit application and adopted pursuant to sections 366.10 to 366.181, 394.21 to 394.37, or 462.351 to 462.365, with regard to the siting, expansion, or operation of a solid waste facility.

Subd. 4b. Permits; hazardous waste facilities. (a) The agency shall provide to the office of environmental assistance established in section 115A.055, copies of each permit application for a hazardous waste facility immediately upon its submittal to the agency. The agency shall request recommendations on each permit application from the office and shall consult with the office on the agency's intended disposition of the recommendations. Except as otherwise provided in sections 115A.18 to 115A.30, the agency shall commence any environmental review required under chapter 116D within 120 days of its acceptance of a completed permit application. The agency shall respond to a permit application for a hazardous waste facility within 120 days following a decision not to prepare environmental documents or following the acceptance of a negative declaration notice or an environmental impact statement. Except as otherwise provided in sections 115A.18 to 115A.30, within 60 days following the submission of a final permit application for a hazardous waste facility, unless a time extension is agreed to by the applicant, the agency shall issue or deny all permits needed for the construction of the proposed facility.

(b) The agency shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 14 for all hazardous waste facilities. The rules shall require:

(1) contingency plans for all hazardous waste facilities which provide for effective containment and control in any emergency condition;

(2) the establishment of a mechanism to assure that money to cover the costs of closure and postclosure monitoring and maintenance of hazardous waste facilities will be available;

(3) the maintenance of liability insurance by the owner or operator of hazardous waste facilities during the operating life of the facility.

Subd. 4c. Repealed, 1983 c 373 s 72

Subd. 4d. Permit fees. (a) The agency may collect permit fees in amounts not greater than those necessary to cover the reasonable costs of reviewing and acting upon applications for agency permits and implementing and enforcing the conditions of the permits pursuant to agency rules. Permit fees shall not include the costs of litigation. The agency shall adopt rules under section 16A.1285 establishing a system for charging permit fees collected under this subdivision. The fee schedule must reflect reasonable and routine permitting, implementation, and enforcement costs. The agency may impose an additional enforcement fee to be collected for a period of up to two years to cover the reasonable costs of implementing and enforcing the conditions of a permit under the rules of the agency. Any money collected under this paragraph shall be deposited in the environmental fund.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), and section 16A.1285, subdivision 2, the agency shall collect an annual fee from the owner or operator of all stationary sources, emission facilities, emissions units, air contaminant treatment facilities, treatment facilities, potential air contaminant storage facilities, or storage facilities subject to the requirement to obtain a permit under subchapter V of the federal Clean Air Act, United States Code, title 42, section 7401 et seq., or section 116.081. The annual fee shall be used to pay for all direct and indirect reasonable costs, including attorney general costs, required to develop and administer the permit program requirements of subchapter V of the federal Clean Air Act, United States Code, title 42, section 7401 et seq., and sections of this chapter and the rules adopted under this chapter related to air contamination and noise. Those costs include the reasonable costs of reviewing and acting upon an application for a permit; implementing and enforcing statutes, rules, and the terms and conditions of a permit; emissions, ambient, and deposition monitoring; preparing generally applicable regulations; responding to federal guidance; modeling, analyses, and demonstrations; preparing inventories and tracking emissions; and providing information to the public about these activities.

(c) The agency shall adopt fee rules in accordance with the procedures in section 16A.1285, subdivision 5, that:

(1) will result in the collection, in the aggregate, from the sources listed in paragraph (b), of an amount not less than $25 per ton of each volatile organic compound; pollutant regulated under United States Code, title 42, section 7411 or 7412 (section 111 or 112 of the federal Clean Air Act); and each pollutant, except carbon monoxide, for which a national primary ambient air quality standard has been promulgated;

(2) may result in the collection, in the aggregate, from the sources listed in paragraph (b), of an amount not less than $25 per ton of each pollutant not listed in clause (1) that is regulated under this chapter or air quality rules adopted under this chapter; and

(3) shall collect, in the aggregate, from the sources listed in paragraph (b), the amount needed to match grant funds received by the state under United States Code, title 42, section 7405 (section 105 of the federal Clean Air Act).

The agency must not include in the calculation of the aggregate amount to be collected under clauses (1) and (2) any amount in excess of 4,000 tons per year of each air pollutant from a source. The increase in air permit fees to match federal grant funds shall be a surcharge on existing fees. The commissioner may not collect the surcharge after the grant funds become unavailable. In addition, the commissioner shall use nonfee funds to the extent practical to match the grant funds so that the fee surcharge is minimized.

(d) To cover the reasonable costs described in paragraph (b), the agency shall provide in the rules promulgated under paragraph (c) for an increase in the fee collected in each year by the percentage, if any, by which the Consumer Price Index for the most recent calendar year ending before the beginning of the year the fee is collected exceeds the Consumer Price Index for the calendar year 1989. For purposes of this paragraph the Consumer Price Index for any calendar year is the average of the Consumer Price Index for all-urban consumers published by the United States Department of Labor, as of the close of the 12-month period ending on August 31 of each calendar year. The revision of the Consumer Price Index that is most consistent with the Consumer Price Index for calendar year 1989 shall be used.

(e) Any money collected under paragraphs (b) to (d) must be deposited in an air quality account in the environmental fund and must be used solely for the activities listed in paragraph (b).

(f) Persons who wish to construct or expand an air emission facility may offer to reimburse the agency for the costs of staff overtime or consultant services needed to expedite permit review. The reimbursement shall be in addition to fees imposed by paragraphs (a) to (d). When the agency determines that it needs additional resources to review the permit application in an expedited manner, and that expediting the review would not disrupt air permitting program priorities, the agency may accept the reimbursement. Reimbursements accepted by the agency are appropriated to the agency for the purpose of reviewing the permit application. Reimbursement by a permit applicant shall precede and not be contingent upon issuance of a permit and shall not affect the agency's decision on whether to issue or deny a permit, what conditions are included in a permit, or the application of state and federal statutes and rules governing permit determinations.

Subd. 4e. Hazardous waste processing facilities; agreements; financial responsibility. When the agency issues a permit for a facility for the processing of hazardous waste, the agency may approve as a condition of the permit an agreement by which the permittee indemnifies the generators of hazardous waste accepted by the facility for part or all of any liability which may accrue to the generators as a result of a release or threatened release of a hazardous waste from the facility. The agency may approve an agreement under this subdivision only if the agency determines that the permittee has demonstrated financial responsibility to carry out the agreement during the term of the permit. If a generator of hazardous waste accepted by a permitted processing facility is held liable for costs or damages arising out of a release of a hazardous waste from the facility, and the permittee is subject to an agreement approved under this subdivision, the generator is liable to the extent that the costs or damages were not paid under this agreement.

Subd. 4f. Closure and postclosure responsibility and liability. An operator or owner of a facility is responsible for closure of the facility and postclosure care relating to the facility. If an owner or operator has failed to provide the required closure or postclosure care of the facility the agency may take the actions. The owner or operator is liable for the costs of the required closure and postclosure care taken by the agency.

Subd. 4g. Closure and postclosure rules. The agency shall adopt rules establishing requirements for the closure of solid waste disposal facilities and for the postclosure care of closed facilities. The rules apply to all solid waste disposal facilities in operation at the time the rules are effective. The rules must provide standards and procedures for closing disposal facilities and for the care, maintenance, and monitoring of the facilities after closure that will prevent, mitigate, or minimize the threat to public health and the environment posed by closed disposal facilities.

Subd. 4h. Financial responsibility rules. (a) The agency shall adopt rules requiring the operator or owner of a solid waste disposal facility to submit to the agency proof of the operator's or owner's financial capability to provide reasonable and necessary response during the operating life of the facility and for 30 years after closure for a mixed municipal solid waste disposal facility or for a minimum of 20 years after closure, as determined by agency rules, for any other solid waste disposal facility, and to provide for the closure of the facility and postclosure care required under agency rules. Proof of financial responsibility is required of the operator or owner of a facility receiving an original permit or a permit for expansion after adoption of the rules. Within 180 days of the effective date of the rules or by July 1, 1987, whichever is later, proof of financial responsibility is required of an operator or owner of a facility with a remaining capacity of more than five years or 500,000 cubic yards that is in operation at the time the rules are adopted. Compliance with the rules and the requirements of paragraph (b) is a condition of obtaining or retaining a permit to operate the facility.

(b) A municipality, as defined in section 475.51, subdivision 2, including a sanitary district, that owns or operates a solid waste disposal facility that was in operation on May 15, 1989, may meet its financial responsibility for all or a portion of the contingency action portion of the reasonable and necessary response costs at the facility by pledging its full faith and credit to meet its responsibility.

The pledge must be made in accordance with the requirements in chapter 475 for issuing bonds of the municipality, and the following additional requirements:

(1) The governing body of the municipality shall enact an ordinance that clearly accepts responsibility for the costs of contingency action at the facility and that reserves, during the operating life of the facility and for the time period required in paragraph (a) after closure, a portion of the debt limit of the municipality, as established under section 475.53 or other law, that is equal to the total contingency action costs.

(2) The municipality shall require that all collectors that haul to the facility implement a plan for reducing solid waste by using volume-based pricing, recycling incentives, or other means.

(3) When a municipality opts to meet a portion of its financial responsibility by relying on its authority to issue bonds, it shall also begin setting aside in a dedicated long-term care trust fund money that will cover a portion of the potential contingency action costs at the facility, the amount to be determined by the agency for each facility based on at least the amount of waste deposited in the disposal facility each year, and the likelihood and potential timing of conditions arising at the facility that will necessitate response action. The agency may not require a municipality to set aside more than five percent of the total cost in a single year.

(4) A municipality shall have and consistently maintain an investment grade bond rating as a condition of using bonding authority to meet financial responsibility under this section.

(5) The municipality shall file with the commissioner of revenue its consent to have the amount of its contingency action costs deducted from state aid payments otherwise due the municipality and paid instead to the environmental response, compensation, and compliance account created in section 115B.20, if the municipality fails to conduct the contingency action at the facility when ordered by the agency. If the agency notifies the commissioner that the municipality has failed to conduct contingency action when ordered by the agency, the commissioner shall deduct the amounts indicated by the agency from the state aids in accordance with the consent filed with the commissioner.

(6) The municipality shall file with the agency written proof that it has complied with the requirements of paragraph (b).

(c) The method for proving financial responsibility under paragraph (b) may not be applied to a new solid waste disposal facility or to expansion of an existing facility, unless the expansion is a vertical expansion. Vertical expansions of qualifying existing facilities cannot be permitted for a duration of longer than three years.

Subd. 4i. Civil penalties. The civil penalties of sections 115.071 and 116.072 apply to any person in violation of the rules adopted under subdivision 4g or 4h.

Subd. 4j. Permits; solid waste facilities. (a) The agency may not issue a permit for new or additional capacity for a mixed municipal solid waste resource recovery or disposal facility as defined in section 115A.03 unless each county using or projected in the permit to use the facility has in place a solid waste management plan approved under section 115A.46 or 473.803 and amended as required by section 115A.96, subdivision 6. The agency shall issue the permit only if the capacity of the facility is consistent with the needs for resource recovery or disposal capacity identified in the approved plan or plans. Consistency must be determined by the office of environmental assistance. Plans approved before January 1, 1990, need not be revised if the capacity sought in the permit is consistent with the approved plan or plans.

(b) The agency shall require as part of the permit application for a waste incineration facility identification of preliminary plans for ash management and ash leachate treatment or ash utilization. The permit issued by the agency must include requirements for ash management and ash leachate treatment.

(c) Within 30 days of receipt by the agency of a permit application for a solid waste facility, the commissioner shall notify the applicant in writing whether the application is complete and if not, what items are needed to make it complete, and shall give an estimate of the time it will take to process the application. Within 180 days of receipt of a completed application, the agency shall approve, disapprove, or delay decision on the application, with reasons for the delay, in writing.

Subd. 4k. Household hazardous waste and other problem materials management. (a) The agency shall adopt rules to require the owner or operator of a solid waste disposal facility or resource recovery facility to submit to the agency and to each county using or projected to use the facility a management plan for the separation of household hazardous waste and other problem materials from solid waste prior to disposal or processing and for the proper management of the waste. The rules must require that the plan be developed in coordination with each county using, or projected to use, the facility. The plan must not be inconsistent with the plan developed under section 115A.956, subdivision 2, and must include:

(1) identification of materials that are problem materials, as defined in section 115A.03, subdivision 24a, for the facility;

(2) participation in public education activities on management of household hazardous waste and other problem materials in the facility's service area;

(3) a strategy for reduction of household hazardous waste and other problem materials entering the facility; and

(4) a plan for the storage and proper management of separated household hazardous waste and other problem materials.

(b) By September 30, 1992, the owner or operator of a facility shall implement the elements of the plan required in paragraph (a) relating to household hazardous waste management. After that date, the agency may not grant or renew a permit for a facility until the agency has:

(1) reviewed the elements of the facility's plan relating to household hazardous waste management;

(2) directed the applicant or permittee to make changes to these elements as necessary to comply with the plan requirements under paragraph (a); and

(3) included a requirement to implement the elements as a condition of the issued or renewed permit.

(c) By September 30, 1993, the owner or operator of a facility shall implement the elements of the plan required in paragraph (a) relating to problem materials management. After that date, the agency may not grant or renew a permit for a facility until the agency has:

(1) reviewed the elements of the facility's plan relating to problem materials management;

(2) directed the applicant or permittee to make changes to these elements as necessary to comply with the plan requirements under paragraph (a); and

(3) included a requirement to implement the elements as a condition of the issued or renewed permit.

Subd. 5. Variances. The pollution control agency may grant variances from its rules as provided in section 14.05, subdivision 4, in order to avoid undue hardship and to promote the effective and reasonable application and enforcement of laws, rules, and standards for prevention, abatement and control of water, air, noise, and land pollution. The variance rules shall provide for notice and opportunity for hearing before a variance is granted.

A local government unit authorized by contract with the pollution control agency pursuant to section 116.05 to exercise administrative powers under this chapter may grant variances after notice and public hearing from any ordinance, rule, or standard for prevention, abatement, or control of water, air, noise and land pollution, adopted pursuant to said administrative powers and under the provisions of this chapter.

Subd. 6. Pollution control agency; exercise of powers. In exercising all its powers the pollution control agency shall give due consideration to the establishment, maintenance, operation and expansion of business, commerce, trade, industry, traffic, and other economic factors and other material matters affecting the feasibility and practicability of any proposed action, including, but not limited to, the burden on a municipality of any tax which may result therefrom, and shall take or provide for such action as may be reasonable, feasible, and practical under the circumstances.

Subd. 7. Counties; processing of applications for animal lot permits. Any Minnesota county board may, by resolution, with approval of the pollution control agency, assume responsibility for processing applications for permits required by the pollution control agency under this section for livestock feedlots, poultry lots or other animal lots. The responsibility for permit application processing, if assumed by a county, may be delegated by the county board to any appropriate county officer or employee.

(a) For the purposes of this subdivision, the term "processing" includes:

(1) the distribution to applicants of forms provided by the pollution control agency;

(2) the receipt and examination of completed application forms, and the certification, in writing, to the pollution control agency either that the animal lot facility for which a permit is sought by an applicant will comply with applicable rules and standards, or, if the facility will not comply, the respects in which a variance would be required for the issuance of a permit; and

(3) rendering to applicants, upon request, assistance necessary for the proper completion of an application.

(b) For the purposes of this subdivision, the term "processing" may include, at the option of the county board, issuing, denying, modifying, imposing conditions upon, or revoking permits pursuant to the provisions of this section or rules promulgated pursuant to it, subject to review, suspension, and reversal by the pollution control agency. The pollution control agency shall, after written notification, have 15 days to review, suspend, modify, or reverse the issuance of the permit. After this period, the action of the county board is final, subject to appeal as provided in chapter 14.

(c) For the purpose of administration of rules adopted under this subdivision, the commissioner and the agency may provide exceptions for cases where the owner of a feedlot has specific written plans to close the feedlot within five years. These exceptions include waiving requirements for major capital improvements.

(d) For purposes of this subdivision, a discharge caused by an extraordinary natural event such as a precipitation event of greater magnitude than the 25-year, 24-hour event, tornado, or flood in excess of the 100-year flood is not a "direct discharge of pollutants."

(e) In adopting and enforcing rules under this subdivision, the commissioner shall cooperate closely with other governmental agencies.

(f) The pollution control agency shall work with the Minnesota extension service, the department of agriculture, the board of water and soil resources, producer groups, local units of government, as well as with appropriate federal agencies such as the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Farm Service Agency, to notify and educate producers of rules under this subdivision at the time the rules are being developed and adopted and at least every two years thereafter.

(g) The pollution control agency shall adopt rules governing the issuance and denial of permits for livestock feedlots, poultry lots or other animal lots pursuant to this section. A feedlot permit is not required for livestock feedlots with more than ten but less than 50 animal units; provided they are not in shoreland areas. These rules apply both to permits issued by counties and to permits issued by the pollution control agency directly.

(h) The pollution control agency shall exercise supervising authority with respect to the processing of animal lot permit applications by a county.

(i) After May 17, 1997, any new rules or amendments to existing rules proposed under the authority granted in this subdivision, must be submitted to the members of legislative policy committees with jurisdiction over agriculture and the environment prior to final adoption. The rules must not become effective until 90 days after the proposed rules are submitted to the members.

(j) Until new rules are adopted that provide for plans for manure storage structures, any plans for a liquid manure storage structure must be prepared or approved by a registered professional engineer or a United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service employee.

(k) A county may adopt by ordinance standards for animal feedlots that are more stringent than standards in pollution control agency rules.

(l) After January 1, 2001, a county that has not accepted delegation of the feedlot permit program must hold a public meeting prior to the agency issuing a feedlot permit for a feedlot facility with 300 or more animal units, unless another public meeting has been held with regard to the feedlot facility to be permitted.

Subd. 7a. Notice of application for livestock feedlot permit. A person who applies to the pollution control agency or a county board for a permit to construct or expand a feedlot with a capacity of 500 animal units or more shall, not later than ten business days after the application is submitted, provide notice to each resident and each owner of real property within 5,000 feet of the perimeter of the proposed feedlot. The notice may be delivered by first class mail, in person, or by the publication in a newspaper of general circulation within the affected area and must include information on the type of livestock and the proposed capacity of the feedlot. Notification under this subdivision is satisfied under an equal or greater notification requirement of a county conditional use permit.

Subd. 7b. Feedlot inventory notification and public meeting requirements. (a) Any state agency or local government unit conducting an inventory or survey of livestock feedlots under its jurisdiction must publicize notice of the inventory in a newspaper of general circulation in the affected area and in other media as appropriate. The notice must state the dates the inventory will be conducted, the information that will be requested in the inventory, and how the information collected will be provided to the public. The notice must also specify the date for a public meeting to provide information regarding the inventory.

(b) A local government unit conducting an inventory or survey of livestock feedlots under its jurisdiction must hold at least one public meeting within the boundaries of the jurisdiction of the local unit of government, prior to beginning the inventory. A state agency conducting a survey of livestock feedlots must hold at least four public meetings outside of the seven-county Twin Cities metropolitan area, prior to beginning the inventory. The public meeting must provide information concerning the dates the inventory will be conducted, the procedure the agency or local unit of government will use to request the information to be included in the inventory, and how the information collected will be provided to the public.

Subd. 7c. NPDES permitting requirements. (a) The agency must issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits for feedlots with 1,000 animal units or more based on the following schedule:

(1) for applications received after April 22, 1998, a permit for a newly constructed or expanded animal feedlot with 2,000 or more animal units must be issued as an individual permit;

(2) for applications received after January 1, 1999, a permit for a newly constructed or expanded animal feedlot with between 1,000 and 2,000 animal units that is identified as a priority by the commissioner, using criteria established under paragraph (e), must be issued as an individual permit; and

(3) after January 1, 2001, all existing feedlots with 1,000 or more animal units must be issued an individual or general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit.

(b) By October 1, 1999, the agency must issue a general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit for animal feedlots with between 1,000 and 2,000 animal units that are not identified under paragraph (a), clause (2).

(c) Prior to the issuance of a general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit for a category of animal feedlot facility permittees, the agency must hold at least one public hearing on the permit issuance.

(d) To the extent practicable, the agency must include a public notice and comment period for an individual National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit concurrent with any public notice and comment for:

(1) the purpose of environmental review of the same facility under chapter 116D; or

(2) the purpose of obtaining a conditional use permit from a local unit of government where the local government unit is the responsible governmental unit for purposes of environmental review under chapter 116D.

(e) By January 1, 1999, the commissioner, in consultation with the feedlot and manure management advisory committee, created under section 17.136, and other interested parties must develop criteria for determining whether an individual National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit is required under paragraph (a), clause (2), for an animal feedlot with between 1,000 and 2,000 animal units. The criteria must be based on proximity to waters of the state, facility design, and other site-specific environmental factors.

(f) By January 1, 2000, the commissioner, in consultation with the feedlot and manure management advisory committee, created under section 17.136, and other interested parties must develop criteria for determining whether an individual National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit is required for an existing animal feedlot, under paragraph (a), clause (3). The criteria must be based on violations and other compliance problems at the facility.

Subd. 8. Public information. The agency may publish, broadcast, or distribute information pertaining to agency activities, laws, rules, and standards.

Subd. 9. Orders; investigations. The agency shall have the following powers and duties for the enforcement of any provision of this chapter and chapter 114C, relating to air contamination or waste:

(a) to adopt, issue, reissue, modify, deny, revoke, enter into or enforce reasonable orders, schedules of compliance and stipulation agreements;

(b) to require the owner or operator of any emission facility, air contaminant treatment facility, potential air contaminant storage facility, or any system or facility related to the storage, collection, transportation, processing, or disposal of waste to establish and maintain records; to make reports; to install, use, and maintain monitoring equipment or methods; and to make tests, including testing for odor where a nuisance may exist, in accordance with methods, at locations, at intervals, and in a manner as the agency shall prescribe; and to provide other information as the agency may reasonably require;

(c) to conduct investigations, issue notices, public and otherwise, and order hearings as it may deem necessary or advisable for the discharge of its duties under this chapter and chapter 114C, including but not limited to the issuance of permits; and to authorize any member, employee, or agent appointed by it to conduct the investigations and issue the notices.

Subd. 10. Repealed, 1997 c 231 art 13 s 20

Subd. 11. Permits; landfarming contaminated soil. (a) If the agency receives an application for a permit to spread soil contaminated by a harmful substance as defined in section 115B.25, subdivision 7a, on land in an organized or unorganized township other than the township of origin of the soil, the agency must notify the board of the organized township, or the county board of the unorganized township where the spreading would occur at least 60 days prior to issuing the permit.

(b) The agency must not issue a permit to spread contaminated soil on land outside the township of origin if, by resolution, the township board of the organized township, or the county board of the unorganized township where the soil is to be spread requests that the agency not issue a permit.

HIST: 1967 c 882 s 7; 1969 c 1046 s 5-7; 1971 c 727 s 3-5; 1971 c 904 s 1; 1973 c 412 s 13; 1973 c 573 s 1; 1973 c 733 s 1; 1974 c 346 s 2-4; 1974 c 483 s 5-7; 1976 c 76 s 4; 1977 c 90 s 10; 1979 c 304 s 1; 1980 c 564 art 11 s 5-10; 1980 c 614 s 123; 1980 c 615 s 60; 1981 c 352 s 27,28; 1982 c 424 s 130; 1982 c 425 s 17; 1982 c 458 s 2; 1982 c 569 s 19; 1983 c 247 s 51; 1983 c 301 s 112-114; 1983 c 373 s 44,45; 1984 c 640 s 32; 1984 c 644 s 49; 1985 c 248 s 70; 1985 c 274 s 14; 1Sp1985 c 13 s 233; 1986 c 425 s 28; 1987 c 348 s 30; 1989 c 131 s 7; 1989 c 276 s 1; 1989 c 325 s 48; 1989 c 335 art 1 s 269; 1Sp1989 c 1 art 20 s 19; 1990 c 426 art 2 s 1; 1990 c 604 art 10 s 6; 1991 c 199 art 2 s 1; 1991 c 254 art 2 s 37; 1991 c 291 art 21 s 3; 1991 c 303 s 4,5; 1991 c 337 s 55; 1991 c 347 art 1 s 8,18; 1992 c 546 s 2; 1992 c 593 art 1 s 31; 1993 c 172 s 77; 1994 c 585 s 32; 1994 c 619 s 8; 1994 c 632 art 2 s 31; 1994 c 637 s 1; 1994 c 639 art 3 s 3; 1995 c 111 s 1; 1995 c 220 s 104,130; 1995 c 233 art 1 s 7,8; art 2 s 49; 1995 c 247 art 1 s 37,38; art 2 s 54; 1995 c 250 s 1; 1995 c 265 art 2 s 14; 1996 c 305 art 1 s 28; art 2 s 25; 1996 c 437 s 20; 1996 c 470 s 19; 1997 c 7 art 1 s 36; 1997 c 143 s 1; 1997 c 158 s 1; 1997 c 216 s 113,114; 1998 c 401 s 41-43

700 State Office Building, 100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul, MN 55155 ♦ Phone: (651) 296-2868 ♦ TTY: 1-800-627-3529 ♦ Fax: (651) 296-0569