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CHAPTER 60--H.F.No. 2310

An act

relating to state government; appropriating money for environment, natural resources, climate, and energy; appropriating money from environment and natural resources trust fund; modifying prior appropriations; providing for and modifying disposition of certain receipts; modifying and establishing duties, authorities, and prohibitions regarding environment and natural resources; modifying and creating environment and natural resources programs; modifying and creating grant programs; modifying permit and environmental review requirements; modifying requirements for recreational vehicles; modifying state trail, state forest, and state park provisions; authorizing sales, conveyances, and leases of certain state lands; modifying forestry provisions; modifying game and fish provisions; modifying regulation of farmed Cervidae; regulating certain seeds and pesticides; modifying Water Law; modifying and providing for fees; establishing a biennial budget for Department of Commerce, Public Utilities Commission, and energy, climate, and clean energy activities; establishing and modifying provisions governing energy, clean and renewable energy, energy storage, energy use and conservation, and utility regulation; adding and modifying provisions governing Public Utilities Commission proceedings; making technical changes; requiring reports; requiring rulemaking;

amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 16A.151, subdivision 2, as amended; 16B.325, subdivision 2; 16C.135, subdivision 3; 16C.137, subdivision 1; 18B.01, subdivision 31; 18B.09, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 21.86, subdivision 2; 35.155, subdivisions 1, 4, 10, 11, 12, by adding subdivisions; 35.156, subdivision 2, by adding subdivisions; 84.02, by adding a subdivision; 84.415, subdivisions 3, 6, 7, by adding a subdivision; 84.66, subdivision 7; 84.788, subdivision 5; 84.82, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 84.821, subdivision 2; 84.84; 84.86, subdivision 1; 84.87, subdivision 1; 84.90, subdivision 7; 84.922, subdivision 4; 84.992, subdivisions 2, 5; 84D.02, subdivision 3; 84D.10, subdivision 3; 85.015, subdivision 10; 85.052, subdivision 6; 85A.01, subdivision 1; 86B.005, by adding a subdivision; 86B.313, subdivision 4; 86B.415, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 3, 4, 5; 89A.03, subdivision 5; 89A.11; 90.181, subdivision 2; 97A.015, subdivision 51, by adding a subdivision; 97A.031; 97A.045, subdivision 5; 97A.126; 97A.137, subdivisions 3, 5; 97A.315, subdivision 1; 97A.401, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 97A.405, subdivisions 2, 5; 97A.420, subdivision 1; 97A.421, subdivision 3; 97A.465, subdivisions 3, 8; 97A.475, subdivision 41; 97B.031, subdivision 1; 97B.037; 97B.071; 97B.301, subdivisions 2, 6; 97B.668; 97C.041; 97C.315, subdivision 1; 97C.345, subdivision 1; 97C.355, by adding a subdivision; 97C.371, subdivisions 1, 2, 4; 97C.395, subdivision 1; 97C.601, subdivision 1; 97C.605, subdivisions 1, 2c, 3; 97C.611; 97C.836; 103B.101, subdivisions 2, 9, 16, by adding a subdivision; 103B.103; 103C.501, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, 6, by adding a subdivision; 103D.605, subdivision 5; 103F.505; 103F.511, by adding subdivisions; 103G.005, by adding subdivisions; 103G.2242, subdivision 1; 103G.271, subdivision 6; 103G.287, subdivisions 2, 3; 103G.299, subdivisions 1, 2, 5, 10; 103G.301, subdivisions 2, 6, 7; 115.01, by adding subdivisions; 115.03, subdivision 1; 115.061; 115A.03, by adding subdivisions; 115A.1415; 115A.49; 115A.51; 115A.54, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, as amended; 115A.565, subdivisions 1, 3; 115B.17, subdivision 14; 115B.171, subdivision 3; 115B.52, subdivision 4; 116.07, by adding a subdivision; 116C.03, subdivision 2a; 116C.779, subdivision 1; 116C.7792; 116P.05, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2; 116P.09, subdivision 6; 116P.11; 116P.15; 116P.16; 116P.18; 168.27, by adding a subdivision; 171.07, by adding a subdivision; 216B.096, subdivision 11; 216B.16, subdivision 10; 216B.164, by adding a subdivision; 216B.1641; 216B.1645, subdivision 4; 216B.1691, by adding a subdivision; 216B.17, subdivision 1; 216B.2402, subdivision 16; 216B.2424, subdivision 5c; 216B.2425, subdivision 3, by adding a subdivision; 216B.243, subdivision 8, as amended; 216B.50, subdivision 1; 216B.62, subdivision 3b; 216C.08; 216C.09; 216C.264, subdivision 5, by adding subdivisions; 216C.375; 216C.435, subdivision 8; 216C.436, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 216E.01, subdivision 6, by adding a subdivision; 216E.03, subdivisions 1, 3, 5, as amended, 6, 7, as amended; 216E.04, subdivision 2, as amended; 216E.05, subdivision 2; 216E.06; 216E.07; 216E.10; 216G.02, subdivision 1; 216H.02, subdivision 1; 237.55; 297A.94; 325E.046; 325F.072, subdivisions 1, 3, by adding a subdivision; 373.475; 515B.2-103; 515B.3-102; Laws 2005, chapter 97, article 10, section 3, as amended; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 5, section 2, subdivision 9; Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivisions 5, 8, 9; Laws 2023, chapter 9, section 19; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 16B; 18B; 21; 84; 86B; 97B; 97C; 103B; 103F; 103G; 115A; 116; 116P; 123B; 216B; 216C; 325E; 473; 500; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 35.155, subdivision 14; 86B.101; 86B.305; 86B.313, subdivisions 2, 3; 97C.605, subdivisions 2, 2a, 2b, 5; 103C.501, subdivisions 2, 3; 115.44, subdivision 9; 116.011; 216C.376; 325E.389; 325E.3891; Minnesota Rules, parts 6100.5000, subparts 3, 4, 5; 6100.5700, subpart 4; 6115.1220, subpart 8; 6256.0500, subparts 2, 2a, 2b, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 8400.0500; 8400.0550; 8400.0600, subparts 4, 5; 8400.0900, subparts 1, 2, 4, 5; 8400.1650; 8400.1700; 8400.1750; 8400.1800; 8400.1900.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA:

ARTICLE 1

ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS

Section 1.

new text begin ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS. new text end

new text begin The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article. The appropriations are from the general fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose. The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively. "The first year" is fiscal year 2024. "The second year" is fiscal year 2025. "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025. new text end

new text begin APPROPRIATIONS new text end
new text begin Available for the Year new text end
new text begin Ending June 30 new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end

Sec. 2.

new text begin POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Total Appropriation new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 305,345,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 229,638,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 179,534,000 new text end new text begin 100,098,000 new text end
new text begin State Government Special Revenue new text end new text begin 85,000 new text end new text begin 90,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 106,055,000 new text end new text begin 109,203,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 19,671,000 new text end new text begin 20,247,000 new text end

new text begin The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions. new text end

new text begin The commissioner must present the agency's biennial budget for fiscal years 2026 and 2027 to the legislature in a transparent way by agency division, including the proposed budget bill and presentations of the budget to committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the agency's budget. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Environmental Analysis and Outcomes new text end

new text begin 79,311,000 new text end new text begin 72,785,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 60,103,000 new text end new text begin 53,047,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 18,959,000 new text end new text begin 19,533,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 249,000 new text end new text begin 205,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $122,000 the first year and $125,000 the second year are from the general fund for: new text end

new text begin (1) a municipal liaison to assist municipalities in implementing and participating in the rulemaking process for water quality standards and navigating the NPDES/SDS permitting process; new text end

new text begin (2) enhanced economic analysis in the rulemaking process for water quality standards, including more-specific analysis and identification of cost-effective permitting; new text end

new text begin (3) developing statewide economic analyses and templates to reduce the amount of information and time required for municipalities to apply for variances from water quality standards; and new text end

new text begin (4) coordinating with the Public Facilities Authority to identify and advocate for the resources needed for urban, suburban, and Greater Minnesota municipalities to achieve permit requirements. new text end

new text begin (b) $216,000 the first year and $219,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for a monitoring program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.454. new text end

new text begin (c) $132,000 the first year and $137,000 the second year are for monitoring water quality and operating assistance programs. new text end

new text begin (d) $390,000 the first year and $399,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for monitoring ambient air for hazardous pollutants. new text end

new text begin (e) $106,000 the first year and $109,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for duties related to harmful chemicals in children's products under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116.9401 to 116.9407. Of this amount, $68,000 the first year and $70,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health. new text end

new text begin (f) $128,000 the first year and $132,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for registering wastewater laboratories. new text end

new text begin (g) $1,492,000 the first year and $1,519,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to continue perfluorochemical biomonitoring in eastern metropolitan communities, as recommended by the Environmental Health Tracking and Biomonitoring Advisory Panel, and to address other environmental health risks, including air quality. The communities must include Hmong and other immigrant farming communities. Of this amount, up to $1,226,000 the first year and $1,248,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health. new text end

new text begin (h) $61,000 the first year and $62,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the listing procedures for impaired waters required under this act. new text end

new text begin (i) $72,000 the first year and $74,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation. These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund. new text end

new text begin (j) $500,000 the first year is to facilitate the collaboration and modeling of greenhouse gas impacts, costs, and benefits of strategies to reduce statewide greenhouse gas emissions. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (k) $50,266,000 the first year and $50,270,000 the second year are to establish and implement a local government climate resiliency and water infrastructure grant program for local governmental units and Tribal governments. Of this amount, $49,100,000 each year is for grants to support communities in planning and implementing projects that will allow for adaptation for a changing climate. At least 40 percent of the money granted under this paragraph must be for projects in areas that meet environmental justice criteria. By December 30, 2027, the commissioner must submit a report on the use of grant money to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $270,000. new text end

new text begin (l) $75,000 the first year is for a grant to the city of Fergus Falls to address water-quality concerns at Lake Alice. new text end

new text begin (m) $150,000 the first year is for a grant to Rice County to address water-quality concerns at French Lake. new text end

new text begin (n) $75,000 the first year is for a grant to Ramsey County to address water-quality concerns at Round Lake. new text end

new text begin (o) Recipients of money appropriated in paragraphs (l), (m), and (n) may use the grants to contract for water-quality improvement services, testing, necessary infrastructure, training, and maintenance. new text end

new text begin (p) $2,070,000 the first year and $2,070,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to develop and implement a program related to emerging issues, including Minnesota's PFAS Blueprint. new text end

new text begin (q) $1,820,000 the first year and $1,820,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to support improved management of data collected by the agency and its partners and regulated parties to facilitate decision-making and public access. new text end

new text begin (r) $500,000 the first year is from the general fund for the report on firefighter turnout gear and biomonitoring required under this act. Of this amount, up to $250,000 may be transferred to the commissioner of health for biomonitoring of firefighters. new text end

new text begin (s) $500,000 the first year is to develop protocols to be used by agencies and departments for sampling and testing groundwater, surface water, public drinking water, and private wells for microplastics and nanoplastics and to begin implementation. The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency may transfer money appropriated under this paragraph to the commissioners of agriculture, natural resources, and health to implement the protocols developed. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025. new text end

new text begin (t) $50,000 the first year is from the remediation fund for the work group on PFAS manufacturer fees and report required under this act. new text end

new text begin (u) $387,000 the first year and $90,000 the second year are to develop and implement the requirements for fish kills under Minnesota Statutes, sections 103G.216 and 103G.2165. Of this amount, up to $331,000 the first year and $90,000 the second year may be transferred to the commissioners of health, natural resources, agriculture, and public safety and to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota as necessary to implement those sections. The base for this appropriation for fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $7,000. new text end

new text begin (v) $63,000 the first year and $92,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health for amending the health risk limit for PFOS. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (w) $5,000,000 the first year is for community air-monitoring grants as provided in this act. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (x) $2,333,000 the first year and $2,333,000 the second year are to adopt rules and implement air toxics emissions requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.062. The general fund appropriations are onetime and are available until June 30, 2027. The base for this appropriation is $0 in fiscal year 2026 and $1,400,000 from the environmental fund in fiscal year 2027 and beyond. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Industrial new text end

new text begin 45,214,000 new text end new text begin 26,929,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 26,415,000 new text end new text begin 7,475,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 17,078,000 new text end new text begin 17,681,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 1,721,000 new text end new text begin 1,773,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $1,621,000 the first year and $1,670,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation. These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund. new text end

new text begin (b) $448,000 the first year and $457,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to further evaluate the use and reduction of trichloroethylene around Minnesota and identify its potential health effects on communities. Of this amount, $145,000 the first year and $149,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health. new text end

new text begin (c) $4,000 the first year and $4,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to purchase air emissions monitoring equipment to support compliance and enforcement activities. new text end

new text begin (d) $3,200,000 the first year and $3,200,000 the second year are to provide air emission reduction grants. Of this amount, $2,800,000 each year is for grants to reduce air pollution at regulated facilities within environmental justice areas of concern. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, and is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (e) $40,000 the first year and $40,000 the second year are for air compliance equipment maintenance. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) $19,100,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are to support research on innovative technologies to treat difficult-to-manage pollutants and for implementation grants based on this research at taconite facilities. Of this amount, $2,100,000 is for the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for academic and applied research through the MnDRIVE program at the Natural Resources Research Institute for research to foster economic development of the state's natural resources in an environmentally sound manner and $16,700,000 is for grants. This appropriation is onetime and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (g) $280,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are from the general fund for the purposes of the public informational meeting requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.07, subdivision 4m. The general fund appropriations are onetime and are available until June 30, 2027. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 is $0 and the base for fiscal year 2027 is $140,000 from the environmental fund. new text end

new text begin (h) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for rulemaking and implementation of the odor management requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.064. new text end

new text begin (i) $2,457,000 the first year and $2,457,000 the second year are from the general fund for implementation of the environmental justice, cumulative impact analysis and other requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.065. The general fund appropriations are onetime and are available until June 30, 2028. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 is $0 and the base for fiscal year 2027 is $2,500,000 from the environmental fund. new text end

new text begin (j) $1,088,000 the first year and $1,088,000 the second year are to support water permitting and compliance programs. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (k) The total general fund base budget for the industrial division for fiscal year 2026 and later is $250,000. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Municipal new text end

new text begin 11,269,000 new text end new text begin 11,917,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 1,305,000 new text end new text begin 1,311,000 new text end
new text begin State Government Special Revenue new text end new text begin 85,000 new text end new text begin 90,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 9,879,000 new text end new text begin 10,516,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $217,000 the first year and $223,000 the second year are for: new text end

new text begin (1) a municipal liaison to assist municipalities in implementing and participating in the rulemaking process for water quality standards and navigating the NPDES/SDS permitting process; new text end

new text begin (2) enhanced economic analysis in the rulemaking process for water quality standards, including more-specific analysis and identification of cost-effective permitting; new text end

new text begin (3) developing statewide economic analyses and templates to reduce the amount of information and time required for municipalities to apply for variances from water quality standards; and new text end

new text begin (4) coordinating with the Public Facilities Authority to identify and advocate for the resources needed for municipalities to achieve permit requirements. new text end

new text begin (b) $50,000 the first year and $50,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for transfer to the Office of Administrative Hearings to establish sanitary districts. new text end

new text begin (c) $1,240,000 the first year and $1,338,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for subsurface sewage treatment system (SSTS) program administration and community technical assistance and education, including grants and technical assistance to communities for water-quality protection. Of this amount, $350,000 each year is for assistance to counties through grants for SSTS program administration. A county receiving a grant from this appropriation must submit the results achieved with the grant to the commissioner as part of its annual SSTS report. Any unexpended balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year. new text end

new text begin (d) $994,000 the first year and $1,094,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to address the need for continued increased activity in new technology review, technical assistance for local governments, and enforcement under Minnesota Statutes, sections 115.55 to 115.58, and to complete the requirements of Laws 2003, chapter 128, article 1, section 165. new text end

new text begin (e) $1,088,000 the first year and $1,088,000 the second year are to support water permitting and compliance programs. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, the appropriations encumbered on or before June 30, 2025, as grants or contracts for subsurface sewage treatment systems, surface water and groundwater assessments, storm water, and water-quality protection in this subdivision are available until June 30, 2028. new text end

new text begin (g) The total general fund base budget for the municipal division for fiscal year 2026 and later is $223,000. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Operations new text end

new text begin 31,658,000 new text end new text begin 30,363,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 20,750,000 new text end new text begin 19,359,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 8,291,000 new text end new text begin 8,513,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 2,617,000 new text end new text begin 2,491,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $1,154,000 the first year and $1,124,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation. These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund. new text end

new text begin (b) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,109,000 the second year are to support agency information technology services provided at the enterprise and agency level to improve operations. new text end

new text begin (c) $906,000 the first year and $919,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to develop and maintain systems to support agency permitting and regulatory business processes and data. new text end

new text begin (d) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are to provide technical assistance to Tribal governments. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (e) $15,750,000 the first year and $14,250,000 the second year are to support modernizing and automating agency environmental programs and data systems and how the agency provides services to regulated parties, partners, and the public. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) $270,000 the first year and $270,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to support current and future career pathways for underrepresented students. new text end

new text begin (g) $700,000 the first year and $700,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to improve the coordination, effectiveness, transparency, and accountability of the environmental review and permitting process. new text end

new text begin (h) $360,000 the first year and $360,000 the second are from the environmental fund to support financial planning and analysis to assist with risk and compliance management across agency programs and financial systems. new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Remediation new text end

new text begin 42,458,000 new text end new text begin 16,162,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 27,140,000 new text end new text begin 140,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 607,000 new text end new text begin 628,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 14,711,000 new text end new text begin 15,394,000 new text end

new text begin (a) All money for environmental response, compensation, and compliance in the remediation fund not otherwise appropriated is appropriated to the commissioners of the Pollution Control Agency and agriculture for purposes of Minnesota Statutes, section 115B.20, subdivision 2, clauses (1), (2), (3), (6), and (7). At the beginning of each fiscal year, the two commissioners must jointly submit to the commissioner of management and budget an annual spending plan that maximizes resource use and appropriately allocates the money between the two departments. new text end

new text begin (b) $415,000 the first year and $426,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to manage contaminated sediment projects at multiple sites identified in the St. Louis River remedial action plan to restore water quality in the St. Louis River Area of Concern. new text end

new text begin (c) $4,476,000 the first year and $4,622,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation. These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund. new text end

new text begin (d) $308,000 the first year and $316,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for transfer to the commissioner of health for private water-supply monitoring and health assessment costs in areas contaminated by unpermitted mixed municipal solid waste disposal facilities and drinking water advisories and public information activities for areas contaminated by hazardous releases. new text end

new text begin (e) $25,000,000 the first year is for grants to support planning, designing, and preparing for solutions for public water treatment systems contaminated with PFAS and for the agency to conduct source investigations of PFAS contamination and to sample, address, and treat private drinking water wells. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, and is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) $76,000 the first year is from the remediation fund for the petroleum tank release cleanup program duties and report required under this act. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (g) $2,000,000 the first year is for a grant to St. Louis County to plan, design, and construct one or more facilities, structures, or other solutions to protect Lake Superior and other waters in the Great Lakes watershed from PFAS contamination from landfills. new text end

new text begin (h) $140,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are for the Pig's Eye Landfill Task Force. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Resource Management and Assistance new text end

new text begin 82,000,000 new text end new text begin 57,974,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 38,464,000 new text end new text begin 13,850,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 43,536,000 new text end new text begin 44,124,000 new text end

new text begin (a) Up to $150,000 the first year and $150,000 the second year may be transferred from the environmental fund to the small business environmental improvement loan account under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.993. new text end

new text begin (b) $1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are for competitive recycling grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.565. Of this amount, $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are from the general fund, and $700,000 the first year and $700,000 the second year are from the environmental fund. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (c) $694,000 the first year and $694,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for emission-reduction activities and grants to small businesses and other nonpoint-emission-reduction efforts. Of this amount, $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are to continue work with Clean Air Minnesota, and the commissioner may enter into an agreement with Environmental Initiative to support this effort. new text end

new text begin (d) $18,450,000 the first year and $18,450,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for SCORE block grants to counties. new text end

new text begin (e) $119,000 the first year and $119,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for environmental assistance grants or loans under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.0716. new text end

new text begin (f) $400,000 the first year and $400,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for grants to develop and expand recycling markets for Minnesota businesses. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (g) $767,000 the first year and $770,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for reducing and diverting food waste, redirecting edible food for consumption, and removing barriers to collecting and recovering organic waste. Of this amount, $500,000 each year is for grants to increase food rescue and waste prevention. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (h) $2,797,000 the first year and $2,811,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, section 473.844. new text end

new text begin (i) $318,000 the first year and $324,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to address chemicals in products, including to implement and enforce flame retardant provisions under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.071, and perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances in food packaging provisions under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.075. Of this amount, $78,000 the first year and $80,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health. new text end

new text begin (j) $180,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are for quantifying climate-related impacts from projects for environmental review. This is a onetime appropriation. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (k) $1,790,000 the first year and $70,000 the second year are for accelerating pollution prevention at small businesses. Of this amount, $1,720,000 the first year is for zero-interest loans to phase out high-polluting equipment, products, and processes and replace with new options. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (l) $190,000 the first year and $190,000 the second year are to support the Greenstep Cities program. This is a onetime appropriation. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (m) $420,000 the first year is to complete a study on the viability of recycling solar energy equipment. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (n) $650,000 the first year and $650,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for Minnesota GreenCorps investment. new text end

new text begin (o) $4,210,000 the first year and $210,000 the second year are for PFAS reduction grants. Of this amount, $4,000,000 the first year is for grants to industry and public entities to identify sources of PFAS entering facilities and to develop pollution prevention and reduction initiatives to reduce PFAS entering facilities, prevent releases, and monitor the effectiveness of these projects. Priority must be given to projects in underserved communities. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (p) $12,940,000 the first year and $12,940,000 the second year are for a waste prevention and reduction grants and loan program. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. Of this amount in the first year, $7,950,000 is for waste prevention and reduction grants and loans and $3,000,000 is for a grant to the owner of a biomass energy generation plant in Shakopee that uses waste heat from the generation of electricity in the malting process to purchase a wood dehydrator to facilitate disposal of wood that is infested by the emerald ash borer. Of this amount in the second year, $10,950,000 is for waste prevention and reduction grants and loans. By October 1, 2024, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources on the use of money appropriated for the wood dehydrator under this paragraph. new text end

new text begin (q) $16,562,000 the first year is for grants to a Minnesota nonprofit corporation that owns a cogeneration facility that serves a St. Paul district heating and cooling system to preserve existing biomass energy infrastructure for purposes of local and regional emerald ash borer response efforts. The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency may require the nonprofit corporation to charge a fee per ton of wood waste delivered to the facility. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2030. new text end

new text begin (r) $1,163,000 the first year and $1,115,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for rulemaking and implementation of the new PFAS requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.943. Of this amount, $312,000 the first year and $468,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health. new text end

new text begin (s) $680,000 the first year is for the resource management report required in this act. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (t) $35,000 the second year is from the environmental fund for the compostable labeling requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 325E.046. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $68,000 from the environmental fund. new text end

new text begin (u) $175,000 the first year is for the rulemaking required under this act providing for the safe and lawful disposal of waste treated seed. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025. new text end

new text begin (v) $1,000,000 the first year is for a lead tackle reduction program that provides outreach, education, and opportunities to safely dispose of and exchange lead tackle throughout the state. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (w) $17,000 the first year is for rulemaking for the capital assistance program. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (x) Any unencumbered grant and loan balances in the first year do not cancel but are available for grants and loans in the second year. Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, the appropriations encumbered on or before June 30, 2025, as contracts or grants for environmental assistance awarded under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.0716; technical and research assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.152; technical assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.52; and pollution prevention assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115D.04, are available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin Subd. 8. new text end

new text begin Watershed new text end

new text begin 11,360,000 new text end new text begin 11,869,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 3,503,000 new text end new text begin 3,503,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 7,484,000 new text end new text begin 7,982,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 373,000 new text end new text begin 384,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $2,959,000 the first year and $2,959,000 the second year are for grants to delegated counties to administer the county feedlot program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.0711, subdivisions 2 and 3. Money remaining after the first year is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (b) $236,000 the first year and $241,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the costs of implementing general operating permits for feedlots over 1,000 animal units. new text end

new text begin (c) $125,000 the first year and $129,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation. These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund. new text end

new text begin (d) $544,000 the first year and $544,000 the second year are to support water permitting and compliance programs. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin Subd. 9. new text end

new text begin Environmental Quality Board new text end

new text begin 2,075,000 new text end new text begin 1,639,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 1,854,000 new text end new text begin 1,413,000 new text end
new text begin Environmental new text end new text begin 221,000 new text end new text begin 226,000 new text end

new text begin $620,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are to develop a Minnesota-based greenhouse gas sector and source-specific guidance, including climate information, a greenhouse gas calculator, and technical assistance for users. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin Subd. 10. new text end

new text begin Transfers new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner must transfer up to $24,000,000 the first year and $24,000,000 the second year from the environmental fund to the remediation fund for purposes of the remediation fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.155, subdivision 2. The base for this transfer is $24,000,000 in fiscal year 2026 and beyond. new text end

new text begin (b) By June 30, 2024, the commissioner of management and budget must transfer $27,397,000 from the general fund to the metropolitan landfill contingency action trust account in the remediation fund to restore the money transferred from the account as intended under Laws 2003, chapter 128, article 1, section 10, paragraph (e), and Laws 2005, First Special Session chapter 1, article 3, section 17, and to compensate the account for the estimated lost investment income. new text end

new text begin (c) Beginning in fiscal year 2024, the commissioner of management and budget must transfer $100,000 each year from the general fund to the metropolitan landfill contingency action trust account in the remediation fund to restore the money transferred from the account as intended under Laws 2003, chapter 128, article 1, section 10, paragraph (e), and Laws 2005, First Special Session chapter 1, article 3, section 17. new text end

Sec. 3.

new text begin NATURAL RESOURCES new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Total Appropriation new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 535,868,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 403,116,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 281,054,000 new text end new text begin 150,078,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 123,986,000 new text end new text begin 123,706,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 129,920,000 new text end new text begin 128,513,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 117,000 new text end new text begin 117,000 new text end
new text begin Permanent School new text end new text begin 791,000 new text end new text begin 702,000 new text end

new text begin The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Land and Mineral Resources Management new text end

new text begin 9,937,000 new text end new text begin 9,670,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 4,937,000 new text end new text begin 4,670,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 4,438,000 new text end new text begin 4,438,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 344,000 new text end new text begin 344,000 new text end
new text begin Permanent School new text end new text begin 218,000 new text end new text begin 218,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $319,000 the first year and $319,000 the second year are for environmental research relating to mine permitting, of which $200,000 each year is from the minerals management account in the natural resources fund and $119,000 each year is from the general fund. new text end

new text begin (b) $3,383,000 the first year and $3,383,000 the second year are from the minerals management account in the natural resources fund for use as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 93.2236, paragraph (c), for mineral resource management, projects to enhance future mineral income, and projects to promote new mineral-resource opportunities. new text end

new text begin (c) $218,000 the first year and $218,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund to secure maximum long-term economic return from the school trust lands consistent with fiduciary responsibilities and sound natural resources conservation and management principles. new text end

new text begin (d) $338,000 the first year and $338,000 the second year are from the water management account in the natural resources fund for mining hydrology. new text end

new text begin (e) $1,294,000 the first year and $484,000 the second year are for modernizing utility licensing for state lands and public waters. These appropriations are available through fiscal year 2028. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) The total general fund base budget for the land and mineral resources management division for fiscal year 2026 and later is $3,586,000. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Ecological and Water Resources new text end

new text begin 48,738,000 new text end new text begin 45,797,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 27,083,000 new text end new text begin 26,142,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 13,831,000 new text end new text begin 13,831,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 7,824,000 new text end new text begin 5,824,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $4,222,000 the first year and $4,222,000 the second year are from the invasive species account in the natural resources fund and $2,831,000 the first year and $2,831,000 the second year are from the general fund for management, public awareness, assessment and monitoring research, and water access inspection to prevent the spread of invasive species; management of invasive plants in public waters; and management of terrestrial invasive species on state-administered lands. new text end

new text begin (b) $6,056,000 the first year and $6,056,000 the second year are from the water management account in the natural resources fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 103G.27, subdivision 2. new text end

new text begin (c) $124,000 the first year and $124,000 the second year are for a grant to the Mississippi Headwaters Board for up to 50 percent of the cost of implementing the comprehensive plan for the upper Mississippi within areas under the board's jurisdiction. By December 15, 2025, the board must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources on the activities funded under this paragraph and the progress made in implementing the comprehensive plan. new text end

new text begin (d) $10,000 the first year and $10,000 the second year are for payment to the Leech Lake Band of Chippewa Indians to implement the band's portion of the comprehensive plan for the upper Mississippi River. new text end

new text begin (e) $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are for grants for up to 50 percent of the cost of implementing the Red River mediation agreement. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $264,000. new text end

new text begin (f) $2,598,000 the first year and $2,598,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1). new text end

new text begin (g) $1,150,000 the first year and $1,150,000 the second year are from the nongame wildlife management account in the natural resources fund for nongame wildlife management. Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 290.431, $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year may be used for nongame wildlife information, education, and promotion. new text end

new text begin (h) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 84.943, $48,000 the first year and $48,000 the second year from the critical habitat private sector matching account may be used to publicize the critical habitat license plate match program. new text end

new text begin (i) $6,000,000 the first year and $6,000,000 the second year are for the following activities: new text end

new text begin (1) financial reimbursement and technical support to soil and water conservation districts or other local units of government for groundwater-level monitoring; new text end

new text begin (2) surface water monitoring and analysis, including installing monitoring gauges; new text end

new text begin (3) groundwater analysis to assist with water-appropriation permitting decisions; new text end

new text begin (4) permit application review incorporating surface water and groundwater technical analysis; new text end

new text begin (5) precipitation data and analysis to improve irrigation use; new text end

new text begin (6) information technology, including electronic permitting and integrated data systems; and new text end

new text begin (7) compliance and monitoring. new text end

new text begin (j) $2,410,000 the first year and $410,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund and $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the general fund for grants to the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center at the University of Minnesota to prioritize, support, and develop research-based solutions that can reduce the effects of aquatic invasive species in Minnesota by preventing spread, controlling populations, and managing ecosystems and to advance knowledge to inspire action by others. new text end

new text begin (k) $268,000 the first year and $268,000 the second year are for increased capacity for broadband utility licensing for state lands and public waters. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028. new text end

new text begin (l) $998,000 the first year and $568,000 the second year are for protecting and restoring carbon storage in state-administered peatlands by reviewing and updating the state's peatland inventory, piloting a restoration project, and piloting trust fund buyouts. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028. new text end

new text begin (m) $250,000 the first year is for a grant to the Minnesota Lakes and Rivers Advocates to work with civic leaders to purchase, install, and operate waterless cleaning stations for watercraft; conduct aquatic invasive species education; and implement education upgrades at public accesses to prevent invasive starry stonewort spread beyond the lakes already infested. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025. new text end

new text begin (n) $1,720,000 the first year is to prevent and manage invasive carp. This includes activities related to the Mississippi River Lock and Dam and stakeholder engagement. Up to $325,000 may be used for a grant to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to study the Mississippi River Lock Dam 5 spillway and provide preliminary design to optimize management to reduce invasive carp passage. new text end

new text begin (o) Up to $6,000,000 the first year is available for transfer from the critical habitat private sector matching account to the reinvest in Minnesota fund to expand Grey Cloud Island Scientific and Natural Area and for other scientific and natural area acquisition, restoration, and enhancement according to Minnesota Statutes, section 84.943, subdivision 5b. new text end

new text begin (p) $40,000 the first year is for a grant to the Stearns Coalition of Lake Associations to manage aquatic invasive species. The unencumbered balance of the general fund appropriation in Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 1, section 3, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), for the grant to the Stearns Coalition of Lake Associations, estimated to be $40,000, is canceled no later than June 29, 2023. new text end

new text begin (q) $200,000 the first year is for a grant to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the University of Minnesota Water Council to develop a scope of work, timeline, and budget for a plan to promote and protect clean water in Minnesota for the next 50 years according to this act. new text end

new text begin (r) The total general fund base budget for the ecological and water resources division for fiscal year 2026 and later is $24,870,000. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Forest Management new text end

new text begin 69,423,000 new text end new text begin 71,765,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 51,645,000 new text end new text begin 53,987,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 16,161,000 new text end new text begin 16,161,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 1,617,000 new text end new text begin 1,617,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $7,521,000 the first year and $7,521,000 the second year are for prevention, presuppression, and suppression costs of emergency firefighting and other costs incurred under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.12. The amount necessary to pay for presuppression and suppression costs during the biennium is appropriated from the general fund. By January 15 each year, the commissioner of natural resources must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house and senate committees and divisions having jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance that identifies all firefighting costs incurred and reimbursements received in the prior fiscal year. These appropriations may not be transferred. Any reimbursement of firefighting expenditures made to the commissioner from any source other than federal mobilizations must be deposited into the general fund. new text end

new text begin (b) $15,386,000 the first year and $15,386,000 the second year are from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 89.039, subdivision 2. new text end

new text begin (c) $1,617,000 the first year and $1,617,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund to advance ecological classification systems (ECS), forest habitat, and invasive species management. new text end

new text begin (d) $906,000 the first year and $926,000 the second year are for the Forest Resources Council to implement the Sustainable Forest Resources Act. new text end

new text begin (e) $1,143,000 the first year and $1,143,000 the second year are for the Next Generation Core Forestry data system. Of this appropriation, $868,000 each year is from the general fund and $275,000 each year is from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund. new text end

new text begin (f) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund for forest road maintenance on state forest roads. new text end

new text begin (g) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are for forest road maintenance on county forest roads. new text end

new text begin (h) $2,086,000 the first year and $2,086,000 the second year are to support forest management, cost-share assistance, and inventory on private woodlands. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (i) $400,000 the first year and $400,000 the second year are to accelerate tree seed collection to support a growing demand for tree planting on public and private lands. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (j) $7,998,000 the first year and $7,998,000 the second year are for grants to local and Tribal governments and nonprofit organizations to enhance community forest ecosystem health and sustainability under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.82, the Minnesota ReLeaf program. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. Money appropriated for grants under this paragraph may be used to pay reasonable costs incurred by the commissioner of natural resources to administer the grants. The base is $400,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026. new text end

new text begin (k) $1,500,000 the first year and $1,500,000 the second year are for forest stand improvement and to meet the reforestation requirements of Minnesota Statutes, section 89.002, subdivision 2. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Parks and Trails Management new text end

new text begin 118,305,000 new text end new text begin 111,680,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 42,952,000 new text end new text begin 36,707,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 73,053,000 new text end new text begin 72,673,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 2,300,000 new text end new text begin 2,300,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $8,485,000 the first year and $8,735,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for state trail, park, and recreation area operations. This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (2). new text end

new text begin (b) $21,828,000 the first year and $22,078,000 the second year are from the state parks account in the natural resources fund to operate and maintain state parks and state recreation areas. new text end

new text begin (c) $1,300,000 the first year and $1,300,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for park and trail grants to local units of government on land to be maintained for at least 20 years for parks or trails. Priority must be given for projects that are in underserved communities or that increase access to persons with disabilities. This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (4). Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (d) $9,624,000 the first year and $9,624,000 the second year are from the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund for the snowmobile grants-in-aid program. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (e) $2,435,000 the first year and $2,435,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for the off-highway vehicle grants-in-aid program. Of this amount, $1,960,000 each year is from the all-terrain vehicle account; $150,000 each year is from the off-highway motorcycle account; and $325,000 each year is from the off-road vehicle account. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (f) $2,250,000 the first year and $2,250,000 the second year are from the state land and water conservation account in the natural resources fund for priorities established by the commissioner for eligible state projects and administrative and planning activities consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 84.0264, and the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund Act. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (g) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for matching grants for local parks and outdoor recreation areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019, subdivision 2. new text end

new text begin (h) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for matching grants for local trail connections under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019, subdivision 4c. new text end

new text begin (i) $750,000 the first year is from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for a grant to St. Louis County to match other funding sources for design, right-of-way acquisition, permitting, and construction of trails within the Voyageur Country ATV trail system. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. This appropriation may be used as a local match to a state capital investment appropriation. new text end

new text begin (j) $700,000 the first year is from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for a grant to St. Louis County to match other funding sources for design, right-of-way acquisition, permitting, and construction of a new trail within the Prospector trail system. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. This appropriation may be used as a local match to a state capital investment appropriation. new text end

new text begin (k) $5,000,000 the first year is to facilitate the transfer of land within Upper Sioux Agency State Park required under this act, including but not limited to the acquisition of any land necessary to facilitate the transfer. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2033. new text end

new text begin (l) $400,000 the first year and $600,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for parks and trails of regional significance outside of the seven-county metropolitan area under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.535, based on the recommendations from the Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission. This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (i). new text end

new text begin (m) $400,000 the first year and $600,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for projects and activities that connect diverse and underserved Minnesotans through expanding cultural environmental experiences, exploration of their environment, and outdoor recreational activities. This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (j). new text end

new text begin (n) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund to the commissioner of natural resources for a grant to Aitkin County, in cooperation with the Northwoods Regional ATV Trail Alliance, to maintain and repair the Northwoods Regional ATV trail system. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (o) $458,000 the first year is for a grant to Dakota County for improvements to the Swing Bridge Trailhead and historic Rock Island Swing Bridge along the Mississippi River Greenway, including LED lighting. new text end

new text begin (p) $1,200,000 the first year is for a grant to Dakota County for adding a public boat launch along the Mississippi River between South St. Paul and Hastings. new text end

new text begin (q) $400,000 the first year is for a grant to the city of Silver Bay for construction of the Silver Bay Trailhead. new text end

new text begin (r) $500,000 the first year is for a grant to the city of Chisholm for trail development, maintenance, and related amenities at Redhead Mountain Bike Park. new text end

new text begin (s) $1,900,000 the first year is for a grant to the town of Crane Lake for construction, improvements, and maintenance at one or more of the following locations: the Crane Lake Voyageurs National Park Visitor Center and Campground and the state-operated boat ramp at Crane Lake. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (t) The total general fund base budget for the parks and trails division for fiscal year 2026 and later is $35,707,000. new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Fish and Wildlife Management new text end

new text begin 111,125,000 new text end new text begin 96,963,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 23,643,000 new text end new text begin 9,888,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 2,082,000 new text end new text begin 2,082,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 85,400,000 new text end new text begin 84,993,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $11,158,000 the first year and $11,158,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund only for activities specified under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1). Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, five percent of this appropriation may be used for expanding hunter and angler recruitment and retention. new text end

new text begin (b) $982,000 the first year and $982,000 the second year are from the general fund and $1,675,000 the first year and $1,675,000 the second year are from the game and fish fund for statewide response and management of chronic wasting disease. The commissioner and the Board of Animal Health must each submit annual reports on chronic wasting disease activities funded in this biennium to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources and agriculture. The general fund base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $282,000. new text end

new text begin (c) $5,150,000 the first year and $3,250,000 the second year are for inspections, investigations, and enforcement activities taken for the white-tailed deer farm program and for statewide response and management of chronic wasting disease. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2029. new text end

new text begin (d) $8,546,000 the first year and $8,546,000 the second year are from the deer management account for the purposes identified in Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.075, subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin (e) $268,000 the first year and $268,000 the second year are for increased capacity for broadband utility licensing for state lands and public waters. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028. new text end

new text begin (f) $10,000,000 the first year is for enhancing prairies and grasslands and restoring wetlands on state-owned wildlife management areas to sequester more carbon and enhance climate resiliency. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (g) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the general fund and $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for grants for natural-resource-based education and recreation programs serving youth under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.976, and for grant administration. Priority must be given to projects benefiting underserved communities. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $500,000 from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund. The general fund appropriation is onetime. new text end

new text begin (h) $2,300,000 the first year is for a grant to the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to expand Minnesota's wild elk population and range. Consideration must be given to moving elk from existing herds in northwest Minnesota to the area of the Fond du Lac State Forest and the Fond du Lac Reservation in Carlton and southern St. Louis Counties. The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa's elk reintroduction efforts must undergo thorough planning with the Department of Natural Resources to develop necessary capture and handling protocols, including protocols related to cervid disease management, and to produce postrelease state and Tribal elk comanagement plans. Of this amount, $300,000 is for the department for the purposes of this paragraph. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (i) $767,000 the first year is from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund to examine the effects of neonicotinoid exposure on the reproduction and survival of Minnesota's game species, including deer and prairie chicken. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (j) $134,000 the first year and $134,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for native fish conservation and classification. new text end

new text begin (k) $82,000 the first year is for the native fish reports required under this act. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (l) $65,000 the first year is for preparing the report on feral pigs and mink required under this act and holding at least one public meeting on the topic. new text end

new text begin (m) Up to $5,750,000 the first year and up to $2,225,000 the second year are available for transfer from the critical habitat private sector matching account to the reinvest in Minnesota fund for wildlife management areas acquisition, restoration, and enhancement according to Minnesota Statutes, section 84.943, subdivision 5b. new text end

new text begin (n) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for shooting sports facility grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 87A.10, including grants for archery facilities. Grants must be matched with a nonstate match, which may include in-kind contributions. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. This appropriation must be allocated as follows: new text end

new text begin (1) $200,000 each fiscal year is for grants of $25,000 or less; and new text end

new text begin (2) $100,000 each fiscal year is for grants in excess of $25,000. new text end

new text begin (o) $75,000 the first year is from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for enhanced fish stocking of white bass and crappies in lakes in the metropolitan area that have pier and shore fishing opportunities where communities are currently underserved. new text end

new text begin (p) $1,633,000 the first year is for a grant to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for chronic wasting disease contingency plans developed by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (q) $900,000 the first year is to create new or expand existing outreach and education programs for non-native English-speaking communities. Of this amount, $250,000 is for the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency and $250,000 is for the Board of Water and Soil Resources for this purpose. Up to $400,000 may be used to expand the Fishing in the Neighborhood program for outreach to new and underserved audiences. This appropriation may be used for community outreach consultants for reaching new audiences. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Enforcement new text end

new text begin 62,062,000 new text end new text begin 61,618,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 15,599,000 new text end new text begin 14,055,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 13,911,000 new text end new text begin 14,011,000 new text end
new text begin Game and Fish new text end new text begin 32,435,000 new text end new text begin 33,435,000 new text end
new text begin Remediation new text end new text begin 117,000 new text end new text begin 117,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $1,718,000 the first year and $1,718,000 the second year are from the general fund for enforcement efforts to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. new text end

new text begin (b) $2,980,000 the first year and $2,980,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for only the purposes specified under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1). new text end

new text begin (c) $1,442,000 the first year and $1,442,000 the second year are from the water recreation account in the natural resources fund for grants to counties for boat and water safety. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (d) $315,000 the first year and $315,000 the second year are from the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund for grants to local law enforcement agencies for snowmobile enforcement activities. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (e) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for grants to qualifying organizations to assist in safety and environmental education and monitoring trails on public lands under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.9011. Grants issued under this paragraph must be issued through a formal agreement with the organization. By December 15 each year, an organization receiving a grant under this paragraph must report to the commissioner with details on expenditures and outcomes from the grant. Of this appropriation, $25,000 each year is for administering these grants. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (f) $510,000 the first year and $510,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for grants to county law enforcement agencies for off-highway vehicle enforcement and public education activities based on off-highway vehicle use in the county. Of this amount, $498,000 each year is from the all-terrain vehicle account, $11,000 each year is from the off-highway motorcycle account, and $1,000 each year is from the off-road vehicle account. The county enforcement agencies may use money received under this appropriation to make grants to other local enforcement agencies within the county that have a high concentration of off-highway vehicle use. Of this appropriation, $25,000 each year is for administering the grants. Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year. new text end

new text begin (g) $2,900,000 of the general fund appropriation for fiscal years 2022 and 2023 in Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 1, section 3, subdivision 7, paragraph (i), for inspections, investigations, and enforcement activities taken in conjunction with the Board of Animal Health for the white-tailed deer farm program is canceled no later than June 29, 2023. new text end

new text begin (h) $3,050,000 the first year is for modernizing the enforcement aviation fleet. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin Subd. 8. new text end

new text begin Operations Support new text end

new text begin 1,984,000 new text end new text begin 1,408,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $1,684,000 the first year and $1,408,000 second year are for information technology security and modernization. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (b) $300,000 the first year is for legal costs. The unencumbered amount of the general fund appropriation in Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 1, section 3, subdivision 8, for legal costs, estimated to be $300,000, is canceled no later than June 29, 2023. new text end

new text begin Subd. 9. new text end

new text begin Pass Through Funds new text end

new text begin 4,294,000 new text end new text begin 4,215,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 3,211,000 new text end new text begin 3,221,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 510,000 new text end new text begin 510,000 new text end
new text begin Permanent School new text end new text begin 573,000 new text end new text begin 484,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $510,000 the first year and $510,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for grants to be divided equally between the city of St. Paul for the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory and the city of Duluth for the Lake Superior Zoo. This appropriation is from revenue deposited to the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (5). new text end

new text begin (b) $211,000 the first year and $221,000 the second year are for the Office of School Trust Lands. new text end

new text begin (c) $250,000 the first year and $150,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund for transaction and project management costs for divesting of school trust lands within Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. new text end

new text begin (d) $323,000 the first year and $334,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund for the Office of School Trust Lands. new text end

new text begin (e) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,000,000 the second year are for proportional payments to Tribes receiving payments under Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.157. This is a onetime appropriation. The commissioner must work with the signatory Tribes to update and amend the affected agreement. new text end

new text begin Subd. 10. new text end

new text begin Get Out MORE (Modernizing Outdoor Recreation Experiences) new text end

new text begin 110,000,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end

new text begin (a) $110,000,000 the first year is for modernizing Minnesota's state-managed outdoor recreation experiences. Of this amount: new text end

new text begin (1) $25,000,000 is for enhancing access and welcoming new users to public lands and outdoor recreation facilities, including improvements to improve climate resiliency; new text end

new text begin (2) $5,000,000 is for modernizing camping and related infrastructure, including improvements to improve climate resiliency; new text end

new text begin (3) $35,000,000 is for modernizing fish hatcheries and fishing infrastructure; new text end

new text begin (4) $10,000,000 is for restoring streams and modernizing water-related infrastructure with priority given to fish habitat improvements, dam removal, and improvements to improve climate resiliency; and new text end

new text begin (5) $35,000,000 is for modernizing boating access. new text end

new text begin (b) Priority for money allocated under paragraph (a), clauses (1), (3), (4), and (5), must be given to projects where communities are currently underserved. new text end

new text begin (c) The commissioner may reallocate money appropriated in paragraph (a) across those purposes based on project readiness and priority. The appropriations in paragraph (a) are available until June 30, 2029. new text end

new text begin (d) No later than November 30 each year, the commissioner must provide a progress report on the expenditure of money appropriated under this subdivision to the chairs of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance. new text end

new text begin Subd. 11. new text end

new text begin Fiscal Year 2023 Appropriation new text end

new text begin $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2023 is from the general fund to address safety concerns at the drill core library. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin Subd. 12. new text end

new text begin Transfer new text end

new text begin By June 30, 2024, the commissioner of management and budget must transfer $58,000 from the water recreation account in the natural resources fund to the driver services operating account under Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.705. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin Subdivisions 3, 7, 8, 11, and 12 are effective the day following final enactment. new text end

Sec. 4.

new text begin BOARD OF WATER AND SOIL RESOURCES new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 61,943,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 58,131,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $3,116,000 the first year and $3,116,000 the second year are for grants and payments to soil and water conservation districts for accomplishing the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103C, and for other general purposes, nonpoint engineering, and implementation and stewardship of the reinvest in Minnesota reserve program. Expenditures may be made from this appropriation for supplies and services benefiting soil and water conservation districts. Any district receiving a payment under this paragraph must maintain a website that publishes, at a minimum, the district's annual report, annual audit, annual budget, and meeting notices. new text end

new text begin (b) $761,000 the first year and $761,000 the second year are to implement, enforce, and provide oversight for the Wetland Conservation Act, including administering the wetland banking program and in-lieu fee mechanism. new text end

new text begin (c) $1,560,000 the first year and $1,560,000 the second year are for the following: new text end

new text begin (1) $1,460,000 the first year and $1,460,000 the second year are for cost-sharing programs of soil and water conservation districts for accomplishing projects and practices consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103C.501, including perennially vegetated riparian buffers, erosion control, water retention and treatment, water quality cost-sharing for feedlots under 500 animal units and nutrient and manure management projects in watersheds where there are impaired waters, and other high-priority conservation practices; and new text end

new text begin (2) $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are for county cooperative weed management programs and to restore native plants at selected invasive species management sites. new text end

new text begin (d) $166,000 the first year and $166,000 the second year are to provide technical assistance to local drainage management officials and for the costs of the Drainage Work Group. The board must coordinate the activities of the Drainage Work Group according to Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.101, subdivision 13. The Drainage Work Group must review a drainage authority's power under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103E, to consider the abandonment or dismantling of drainage systems; to re-meander, restore, or reconstruct a natural waterway that has been modified by drainage; or to deconstruct dikes, dams, or other water-control structures. new text end

new text begin (e) $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are for a grant to the Red River Basin Commission for water quality and floodplain management, including program administration. This appropriation must be matched by nonstate funds. new text end

new text begin (f) $190,000 the first year and $190,000 the second year are for grants to Area II Minnesota River Basin Projects for floodplain management. The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $140,000. new text end

new text begin (g) $125,000 the first year and $125,000 the second year are for conservation easement stewardship. new text end

new text begin (h) $240,000 the first year and $240,000 the second year are for a grant to the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District to defray the annual cost of operating and maintaining sites for dredge spoil to sustain the state, national, and international commercial and recreational navigation on the lower Minnesota River. new text end

new text begin (i) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for the lawns to legumes program under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.104. The board may enter into agreements with local governments, Metro Blooms, and other organizations to support this effort. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (j) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for the habitat enhancement landscape program under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.106. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (k) $10,557,000 the first year and $10,557,000 the second year are for soil health activities to achieve water quality, soil productivity, climate change resiliency, or carbon sequestration benefits consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.06. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. The board may use grants to local governments, including soil and water conservation districts, and agreements with the United States Department of Agriculture; the University of Minnesota, Office for Soil Health; AgCentric, Minnesota State Northern Center of Excellence; and other practitioners and partners to accomplish this work. new text end

new text begin (l) $203,000 the first year and $203,000 the second year are for soil health practice adoption purposes consistent with the cost-sharing provisions of Minnesota Statutes, section 103C.501, and for soil health program responsibilities in consultation with the University of Minnesota Office for Soil Health. new text end

new text begin (m) $10,500,000 the first year and $10,500,000 the second year are for conservation easements and to restore and enhance grasslands and adjacent lands consistent with Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531, for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, carbon sequestration, and related benefits. Of this amount, up to $423,000 is for deposit in the water and soil conservation easement stewardship account established under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.103. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029. The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program. new text end

new text begin (n) $4,000,000 the first year and $5,000,000 the second year are to acquire conservation easements and to restore and enhance peatlands and adjacent lands consistent with Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531, for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, carbon sequestration, and related benefits. Of this amount, up to $299,000 is for deposit in the water and soil conservation easement stewardship account established under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.103. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029. The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program. new text end

new text begin (o) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are to enhance existing easements established under Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531. Enhancements are for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, and carbon sequestration and include but are not limited to increasing biodiversity and mitigating the effects of rainfall and runoff events. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029. The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program. new text end

new text begin (p) $8,500,000 the first year and $8,500,000 the second year are for water quality and storage practices and projects to protect infrastructure, improve water quality and related public benefits, and mitigate climate change impacts consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.05. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029. The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program. new text end

new text begin (q) $4,673,000 the first year and $4,673,000 the second year are for natural resources block grants to local governments to implement the Wetland Conservation Act and shoreland management program under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103F, and local water management responsibilities under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103B. The board may reduce the amount of the natural resources block grant to a county by an amount equal to any reduction in the county's general services allocation to a soil and water conservation district from the county's previous year allocation when the board determines that the reduction was disproportionate. The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $3,423,000. new text end

new text begin (r) $129,000 the first year and $136,000 the second year are to accomplish the objectives of Minnesota Statutes, section 10.65, and related Tribal government coordination. The base for fiscal year 2026 and each year thereafter is $144,000. new text end

new text begin (s) $3,000,000 the first year is to provide onetime state incentive payments to enrollees in the federal Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) during the continuous enrollment period and to enroll complementary areas in conservation easements consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515. The board may establish payment rates based on land valuation and on environmental benefit criteria, including but not limited to surface water or groundwater pollution reduction, drinking water protection, soil health, pollinator and wildlife habitat, and other conservation enhancements. The board may use state funds to implement the program and to provide technical assistance to landowners or their agents to fulfill enrollment and contract provisions. The board must consult with the commissioners of agriculture, health, natural resources, and the Pollution Control Agency and the United States Department of Agriculture in establishing program criteria. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (t) $2,000,000 the first year is to acquire conservation easements from landowners to preserve, restore, create, and enhance wetlands and associated uplands of prairie and grasslands and to restore and enhance rivers and streams, riparian lands, and associated uplands of prairie and grasslands, in order to protect soil and water quality, support fish and wildlife habitat, reduce flood damage, and provide other public benefits. Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515, applies to this program. The board must give priority to leveraging federal money by enrolling targeted new lands or enrolling environmentally sensitive lands that have expiring federal conservation agreements. The board is authorized to enter into new agreements and amend past agreements with landowners as required by Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515, subdivision 5, to allow for restoration. Up to five percent of this appropriation may be used for restoration and enhancement. new text end

new text begin (u) $5,623,000 the first year and $5,804,000 the second year are for agency administration and operation of the Board of Water and Soil Resources. new text end

new text begin (v) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are for the habitat-friendly utilities program under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.105. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (w) The board may shift money in this section and may adjust the technical and administrative assistance portion of the funds to leverage federal or other nonstate funds or to address accountability, oversight, local government performance, or high-priority needs. new text end

new text begin (x) Returned grants and payments are available for two years after they are returned or regranted, whichever is later. Funds must be regranted consistent with the purposes of this section. If an appropriation for grants in either year is insufficient, the appropriation in the other year is available for it. new text end

new text begin (y) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16B.97, grants awarded from appropriations in this section are exempt from the Department of Administration, Office of Grants Management Policy 08-08 Grant Payments and 08-10 Grant Monitoring. new text end

Sec. 5.

new text begin METROPOLITAN COUNCIL new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 32,240,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 11,490,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 23,290,000 new text end new text begin 2,540,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 8,950,000 new text end new text begin 8,950,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $8,540,000 the first year and $2,540,000 the second year are for metropolitan-area regional parks operation and maintenance according to Minnesota Statutes, section 473.351. new text end

new text begin (b) $8,950,000 the first year and $8,950,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for metropolitan-area regional parks and trails maintenance and operations. This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (3). new text end

new text begin (c) $9,000,000 the first year is to modernize regional parks and trails. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (d) $2,750,000 the first year is for capital improvements to the municipal wastewater collection system within the city of Newport to reduce the amount of inflow and infiltration to the sanitary sewer disposal system. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

new text begin (e) $1,000,000 the first year is for grants to implementing agencies to remove hazardous trees and replace ash trees with more diverse, climate-adapted species within the metropolitan regional park system. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) $2,000,000 the first year is to develop a comprehensive plan to ensure communities in the White Bear Lake area have access to sufficient safe drinking water to allow for municipal growth while simultaneously ensuring the sustainability of surface water and groundwater resources to supply the needs of future generations. The Metropolitan Council must establish a work group consisting of the commissioners of natural resources, health, and the Pollution Control Agency or their designees and representatives from the Metropolitan Area Water Supply Advisory Committee; the St. Paul Regional Water Services; the cities of Stillwater, Mahtomedi, Hugo, Lake Elmo, Lino Lakes, North St. Paul, Oakdale, Vadnais Heights, Shoreview, Woodbury, New Brighton, North Oaks, and White Bear Lake; and the town of White Bear to advise the council in developing the comprehensive plan. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. The comprehensive plan must: new text end

new text begin (1) evaluate methods for conserving and recharging groundwater in the area, including: new text end

new text begin (i) converting water supplies that are groundwater dependent to total or partial supplies from surface water sources; new text end

new text begin (ii) reusing water, including water discharged from contaminated wells; new text end

new text begin (iii) projects designed to increase groundwater recharge; and new text end

new text begin (iv) other methods for reducing groundwater use; new text end

new text begin (2) based on the evaluation conducted under clause (1), determine which existing groundwater supply wells, if converted to surface water sources, would be most effective and efficient in ensuring future water sustainability in the area; new text end

new text begin (3) identify a long-term plan for converting groundwater supply wells identified in clause (2) to surface water sources, including recommendations on water supply governance and concept-level engineering that addresses preliminary design considerations, including supply source, treatment, distribution, operation, and financing needed to complete any changes to water supply infrastructure; new text end

new text begin (4) include any policy and funding recommendations for converting groundwater supply wells to surface water sources, recommendations for treating and reusing wastewater, and any other recommendations for additional measures that reduce groundwater use, promote water reuse, and increase groundwater recharge; new text end

new text begin (5) include any policy and funding recommendations for local wastewater treatment and recharge; and new text end

new text begin (6) be submitted to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance and policy by June 30, 2027. new text end

Sec. 6.

new text begin CONSERVATION CORPS MINNESOTA new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 1,070,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 1,070,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 580,000 new text end new text begin 580,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 490,000 new text end new text begin 490,000 new text end

new text begin Conservation Corps Minnesota may receive money appropriated from the natural resources fund under this section only as provided in an agreement with the commissioner of natural resources. new text end

Sec. 7.

new text begin ZOOLOGICAL BOARD new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 14,244,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 13,812,000 new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin General new text end new text begin 13,989,000 new text end new text begin 13,557,000 new text end
new text begin Natural Resources new text end new text begin 255,000 new text end new text begin 255,000 new text end

new text begin (a) $255,000 the first year and $255,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund from revenue deposited under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (5). new text end

new text begin (b) $850,000 the first year is to improve safety and security at the Minnesota Zoo. This is a onetime appropriation. new text end

Sec. 8.

new text begin SCIENCE MUSEUM new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 8,200,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 1,260,000 new text end

new text begin $7,000,000 the first year is for debt reduction, rehiring and retaining employees, supporting employee contracts, and diversity and inclusion training and outreach. new text end

Sec. 9.

new text begin UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 1,500,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin -0- new text end

new text begin (a) $1,000,000 the first year is for the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center to enhance and implement the center's aquatic invasive species research-based solutions through: new text end

new text begin (1) implementation of a watershed-scale carp management plan and additional research focused on site-specific method refinement and evaluation; new text end

new text begin (2) creation of a long-term monitoring program with state and local partners that evaluates the feasibility of whole-lake zebra mussel control projects and the development of criteria for selecting and managing lakes; new text end

new text begin (3) refinement and implementation of large-scale surveillance and early detection methods for high-priority aquatic invasive species, including but not limited to zebra mussels, spiny water flea, and starry stonewort; and new text end

new text begin (4) development and sharing, with relevant experts and stakeholders, contingency plans regarding the potential risks of aquatic invasive species. The contingency plans must provide a blueprint for preparedness and response planning documents, including authoritative risk communication, education, and outreach materials. The communication, education, and outreach materials must be prepared in multiple languages, including but not limited to Tribal languages. new text end

new text begin (b) The board must ensure that the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center coordinates research activities funded under paragraph (a) with Tribal governments. new text end

new text begin (c) The appropriation under paragraph (a) is onetime and available until June 30, 2027. new text end

new text begin (d) $500,000 the first year is for a multidisciplinary research study involving several departments of the University of Minnesota, including the Department of Forest Resources; Department of Soil, Water, and Climate; Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering; and Department of Applied Economics, of lowland conifer stands over 40 acres that are under state management. The study must provide spatial estimates for carbon found in aboveground biomass, as well as soils and peat; develop strategies that maximize mitigation of global climate change; and provide recommendations for maximizing climate resilience, encouraging biodiversity, and providing air- and water-quality benefits. A report with the results of the study must be submitted to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources by January 15, 2027. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

Sec. 10.

new text begin PUBLIC SAFETY new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin -0- new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin 229,000 new text end

new text begin $229,000 the second year is from the fire safety account in the special revenue fund for purposes of the class B firefighting foam requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.072. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026. new text end

ARTICLE 2

ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES TRUST FUND

Section 1.

new text begin APPROPRIATIONS.new text end

new text begin The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article. The appropriations are from the environment and natural resources trust fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose. The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively. "The first year" is fiscal year 2024. "The second year" is fiscal year 2025. "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025. Any unencumbered balance remaining in the first year does not cancel and is available for the second year or until the end of the appropriation. These are onetime appropriations. new text end

new text begin APPROPRIATIONS new text end
new text begin Available for the Year new text end
new text begin Ending June 30 new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end

Sec. 2.

new text begin MINNESOTA RESOURCES new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Total Appropriation new text end

new text begin $ new text end new text begin 79,833,000 new text end new text begin $ new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin 2024 new text end new text begin 2025 new text end
new text begin Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund new text end new text begin 79,644,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin Great Lakes Protection Account new text end new text begin 189,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end

new text begin The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Definitions new text end

new text begin (a) "Trust fund" means the Minnesota environment and natural resources trust fund established under the Minnesota Constitution, article XI, section 14. new text end

new text begin (b) "Great Lakes protection account" means the account referred to in Minnesota Statutes, section 116Q.02. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Foundational Natural Resource Data and Information new text end

new text begin 8,219,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Assessing Restorations for Rusty-Patched and Other Bumblebee Habitat new text end

new text begin $75,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Friends of the Mississippi River to assess how prairie restoration and different restoration seeding methods affect bumblebee abundance, diversity, and habitat and make recommendations to improve restoration outcomes. new text end

new text begin (b) Removing Barriers to Carbon Market Entry new text end

new text begin $482,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop ground-tested carbon stock models of forest resources throughout Minnesota to enable better resource management of public and private forests as well as generate reliable tools for landowners seeking to enter carbon markets. new text end

new text begin (c) Mapping Migratory Bird Pit Stops in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $340,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the National Audubon Society, Minnesota office, to identify avian migratory stopover sites, develop a shared decision-support tool, and publish guidance for conserving migratory birds in Minnesota. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (d) Enhancing Knowledge of Minnesota River Fish Ecology new text end

new text begin $199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to collect baseline information about the diets, distribution, status, and movement patterns of fish in the Minnesota River to inform management and conservation decisions. new text end

new text begin (e) Changing Distribution of Flying Squirrel Species in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $186,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to determine current distribution and habitat associations of northern and southern flying squirrels to fill key knowledge gaps in flying squirrel status in Minnesota. new text end

new text begin (f) Statewide Forest Carbon Inventory and Change Mapping new text end

new text begin $987,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to work with Minnesota Forest Resources Council, Minnesota Forestry Association, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and the University of Minnesota to develop a programmatic approach and begin collecting plot-based inventories on private forestland for use with remote sensing data to better assess changing forest conditions and climate mitigation opportunities across all ownerships in the state. new text end

new text begin (g) Predicting the Future of Aquatic Species by Understanding the Past new text end

new text begin $170,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to use past and present information to model future ranges of native aquatic species in Minnesota to generate publicly available tools for species and habitat management. new text end

new text begin (h) Assessing Status of Common Tern Populations in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to assess the population status of Common Tern breeding colonies in Minnesota, implement management activities, and develop a standardized monitoring protocol and online database for accessing current and historic monitoring data to help prioritize conservation and restoration actions for this state-threatened species. new text end

new text begin (i) Salvaged Wildlife to Inform Environmental Health, Ecology, and Education new text end

new text begin $486,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Bell Museum of Natural History, to establish a statewide network to collect, analyze, and archive salvaged dead wildlife and build a foundation of biodiversity resources to track ecosystem-wide changes, monitor environmental health, and educate Minnesotans about the value of scientific specimens. new text end

new text begin (j) Developing Conservation Priorities for Rare and Specialist Bees new text end

new text begin $619,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to collect data on rare and specialist bees and their habitat preferences, determine their conservation status, and develop strategies to improve their chances of survival. new text end

new text begin (k) Efficacy of Urban Archery Hunting to Manage Deer new text end

new text begin $393,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities for Bemidji State University to conduct an analysis of deer survival, habitat use, and hunter data in the city of Bemidji to improve special archery hunt management practices in urban areas of the state. new text end

new text begin (l) Mapping the Ecology of Urban and Rural Canids new text end

new text begin $601,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to determine how disease prevalence, diet, habitat use, and interspecies interactions of coyotes and foxes change from urban to rural areas along the Mississippi River corridor. new text end

new text begin (m) Maximizing Lowland Conifer Ecosystem Services - Phase II new text end

new text begin $482,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to continue monitoring forested peatland hydrology and wildlife, conduct new wildlife and habitat surveys, and quantify carbon storage to provide support for management decisions. new text end

new text begin (n) Modernizing Minnesota's Wildlife (and Plant) Action Plan new text end

new text begin $889,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to modernize the Minnesota Wildlife Action Plan by filling critical data gaps, including adding rare plants to the plan, and standardizing conservation status assessment methods to ensure Minnesota's natural heritage is protected into the future. new text end

new text begin (o) Linking Breeding and Migratory Bird Populations in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory to map year-round habitat use of understudied bird species of special conservation concern and evaluate areas with the greatest risk of contaminant exposure. new text end

new text begin (p) Old Growth Forest Monitoring new text end

new text begin $441,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to establish baseline conditions and develop a cost-effective method to monitor approximately 93,000 acres of old growth forest in Minnesota to ensure that these rare and important forest resources are properly protected. new text end

new text begin (q) Integrating Remotely Sensed Data with Traditional Forest Inventory new text end

new text begin $191,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to calibrate and optimize the use of LiDAR for forest inventory purposes and estimate stand-level forest resource metrics in northeastern Minnesota so ecosystem services can be better considered in management decisions. new text end

new text begin (r) Community Response Monitoring for Adaptive Management in Southeast Minnesota new text end

new text begin $483,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with The Nature Conservancy to assess community-level plant and animal responses to past restoration efforts in select southeast Minnesota conservation focus areas to determine if management outcomes are being achieved. new text end

new text begin (s) Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas - Phase III new text end

new text begin $797,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Bell Museum of Natural History, to expand the Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas to include more than 2,000,000 records and images of Minnesota wildlife, plants, and fungi by adding insect specimens, collections from new partners, historical data, and repatriating records of Minnesota's biodiversity that exist in various federal institutions. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Water Resources new text end

new text begin 8,328,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin Appropriations by Fund new text end
new text begin Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund new text end new text begin 8,139,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin Great Lakes Protection Account new text end new text begin 189,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Ditching Delinquent Ditches: Optimizing Wetland Restoration new text end

new text begin $199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to use new techniques to identify and rank areas statewide where targeted removal of poorly functioning drainage ditches and restoration to wetlands can provide maximum human and ecological benefits, including aquifer recharge and flood prevention. new text end

new text begin (b) Assessment of Red River Basin Project Outcomes new text end

new text begin $920,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Red River Watershed Management Board acting as fiscal agent for the Red River Basin Flood Damage Reduction Work Group to plan and implement multiresource monitoring at flood damage reduction and natural resource enhancement projects across the Red River Basin to evaluate outcomes and improve design of future projects at a regional scale. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (c) Wind Wave and Boating Impacts on Inland Lakes new text end

new text begin $415,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to conduct a field study to measure the impacts of boat propeller wash and boat wakes on lake bottoms, shorelines, and water quality compared to the impacts of wind-generated waves. new text end

new text begin (d) Finding, Capturing, and Destroying PFAS in Minnesota Waters new text end

new text begin $478,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop novel methods for the detection, sequestration, and degradation of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in Minnesota's lakes and rivers. new text end

new text begin (e) Sinking and Suspended Microplastic Particles in Lake Superior new text end

new text begin $412,000 the first year is to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Large Lakes Observatory in Duluth to investigate the abundance, characteristics, and fate of microplastic particles in Lake Superior to inform remediation strategies and analyses of environmental impacts. Of this amount, $189,000 is from the Great Lakes protection account and $223,000 is from the trust fund. These appropriations may also be used to educate the public about the research conducted with this appropriation. new text end

new text begin (f) Ecotoxicological Impacts of Quinone Outside Inhibitor (QoI) Fungicides new text end

new text begin $279,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the University of St. Thomas to assess the ecological hazards associated with QoI fungicides and their major environmental transformation products. new text end

new text begin (g) Brightsdale Dam Channel Restoration new text end

new text begin $1,004,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Fillmore County Soil and Water Conservation District to reduce sedimentation and improve aquatic habitat by restoring a channel of the north branch of the Root River at the site of a failed hydroelectric power dam that was removed in 2003. new text end

new text begin (h) Mapping Aquifer Recharge Potential new text end

new text begin $391,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to partner with the Freshwater Society to develop a practical tool for mapping aquifer recharge potential, demonstrate the tool with laboratory and field tests, use the tool to evaluate recharge potential of several aquifers in Minnesota, and analyze aquifer recharge policy. new text end

new text begin (i) ALASD's Chloride Source Reduction Pilot Program new text end

new text begin $764,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Alexandria Lake Area Sanitary District (ALASD) to coordinate with Douglas County and the Pollution Control Agency to pilot an incentive program for residences and businesses to install high-efficiency water softeners, salt-free systems, or softener discharge disposal systems to reduce the annual salt load to Lake Winona and downstream waters. The pilot program includes rebates, inspections, community education, and water quality monitoring to measure chloride reduction success. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (j) Removing CECs from Stormwater with Biofiltration new text end

new text begin $641,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to develop a treatment practice design using biofiltration media to remove contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) from stormwater runoff and to provide statewide stormwater management guidance. new text end

new text begin (k) Didymo II The North Shore Threat Continues new text end

new text begin $394,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Science Museum of Minnesota for the St. Croix Watershed Research Station to identify North Shore streams with didymo, determine the risk of invasion to other streams, document didymo impacts to stream functioning, and develop strategies to prevent further spread of didymo. new text end

new text begin (l) Leveraging Data Analytics Innovations for Watershed District Planning new text end

new text begin $738,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Minnehaha Creek Watershed District to integrate local and statewide data sets into a high-resolution planning tool that forecasts the impacts of changing precipitation patterns and quantitatively compares cost effectiveness and outcomes for water quality, ecological integrity, and flood prevention projects in the district. Minnehaha Creek Watershed District may license third parties to use products developed with this appropriation without further approval from the legislature or the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, provided the licensing does not generate income. This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10. new text end

new text begin (m) Protecting Water in the Central Sands Region of the Mississippi River Headwaters new text end

new text begin $1,693,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the White Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa Indians to conduct a policy analysis and assess aggregate irrigation impacts on water quality and quantity in the Pineland Sands region of the state. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Environmental Education new text end

new text begin 3,905,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Fostering Conservation by Connecting Students to the BWCA new text end

new text begin $1,080,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness to connect Minnesota youth to the Boundary Waters through environmental education, experiential learning, and wilderness canoe trips. new text end

new text begin (b) Statewide Environmental Education via PBS Outdoor Series new text end

new text begin $391,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pioneer Public Broadcasting Service to produce new episodes of a statewide public television series and an educational web page designed to inspire Minnesotans to connect with the outdoors and to restore and protect the state's natural resources. new text end

new text begin (c) Increasing Diversity in Environmental Careers new text end

new text begin $763,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources in cooperation with Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa to ensure a stable and prepared natural resources work force in Minnesota by encouraging a diversity of students to pursue careers in environment and natural resources through internships, mentorships, and fellowships with the Department of Natural Resources, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and the Pollution Control Agency. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (d) Reducing Biophobia & Fostering Environmental Stewardship in Underserved Schools new text end

new text begin $180,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Raptor Center to foster long-lasting environmental stewardship and literacy in Minnesota youth in underserved schools by providing engaging, multiunit, standards-based environmental programming featuring positive interactions with raptors and evaluating program effectiveness and areas for improvement. new text end

new text begin (e) Sharing Minnesota's Biggest Environmental Investment new text end

new text begin $628,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Science Museum of Minnesota, in coordination with the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCCMR), to increase public access to the results of LCCMR-recommended research, including through a free online interactive map, in-depth videos, and public events. new text end

new text begin (f) North Shore Private Forestry Outreach and Implementation new text end

new text begin $375,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Sugarloaf: The North Shore Stewardship Association to conduct outreach to private forest landowners, develop site restoration plans, and connect landowners with restoration assistance to encourage private forest restoration and improve the ecological health of Minnesota's North Shore forest landscape. new text end

new text begin (g) Teaching Students about Watersheds through Outdoor Science new text end

new text begin $290,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Minnesota Trout Unlimited to engage students in classroom and outdoor hands-on learning focused on water quality, groundwater, aquatic life, and watershed stewardship and provide youth and their families with fishing experiences to further foster a conservation ethic. new text end

new text begin (h) Bioblitz Urban Parks: Engaging Communities in Scientific Efforts new text end

new text begin $198,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to work with volunteers to collect baseline biodiversity data for neighborhood and regional parks to inspire stewardship and inform habitat restoration work. new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species new text end

new text begin 5,104,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Northward Expansion of Ecologically Damaging Amphibians and Reptiles new text end

new text begin $163,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to assess the distribution and potential for expansion of key detrimental and nonnative amphibians and reptiles in Minnesota. new text end

new text begin (b) Developing Research-Based Solutions to Minnesota's AIS Problems new text end

new text begin $4,941,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center to conduct high-priority projects aimed at solving Minnesota's aquatic invasive species problems using rigorous science and a collaborative process. Additionally, funds may be spent to deliver research findings to end users through strategic communication and outreach. This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Air Quality, Climate Change, and Renewable Energy new text end

new text begin 3,913,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Community Forestry AmeriCorps new text end

new text begin $1,500,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with ServeMinnesota to preserve and increase tree canopy throughout the state by training, supporting, and deploying AmeriCorps members to local agencies and nonprofit organizations to plant and inventory trees, develop and implement pest management plans, create and maintain nursery beds for replacement trees, and organize opportunities for community engagement in tree stewardship activities. new text end

new text begin (b) Biochar Implementation in Habitat Restoration: A Pilot new text end

new text begin $185,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to pilot the use of portable biochar kilns as an alternative to open-pile burning of trees and shrubs to reduce smoke and carbon emissions and produce beneficial by-products from invasive species removal and land restoration efforts. new text end

new text begin (c) Completing Installment of the Minnesota Ecological Monitoring Network new text end

new text begin $1,094,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to improve conservation and management of Minnesota's native forests, wetlands, and grasslands by completing the Ecological Monitoring Network to measure ecosystems' change through time. new text end

new text begin (d) Lichens as Low-Cost Air Quality Monitors in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $341,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop community science protocols for using lichens as indicators of air quality and conduct an analysis of air pollution changes across Minnesota in the present and in the past century. new text end

new text begin (e) Environment-Friendly Decarbonizing of Steel Production with Hydrogen Plasma new text end

new text begin $739,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to investigate the use of microwave hydrogen plasma to reduce fossil fuel use, carbon dioxide emissions, and waste and enable the use of alternative iron resources, including lower quality iron ores, tailings, and iron ore waste piles, in the iron-making industry. This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10. new text end

new text begin (f) Economic Analysis Guide for Minnesota Climate Investments new text end

new text begin $54,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to create a guide that will incorporate nation-wide best practices for considering costs, benefits, economics, and equity in Minnesota climate policy decisions. new text end

new text begin Subd. 8. new text end

new text begin Methods to Protect or Restore Land, Water, and Habitat new text end

new text begin 15,997,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) Minnesota Bee and Beneficial Species Habitat Enhancement II new text end

new text begin $876,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pheasants Forever Inc. to enhance grassland habitats to benefit pollinators and other wildlife species on permanently protected lands and to collaborate with the University of Minnesota to determine best practices for seeding timing and techniques. new text end

new text begin (b) Karner Blue Butterfly Insurance Population Establishment in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $405,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Three Rivers Park District to establish a breeding population of the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly on protected lands within the butterfly's northern expanding range, increase the habitat area, and evaluate the butterfly establishment effort to assist with adaptive management. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (c) Root River Habitat Restoration at Eagle Bluff new text end

new text begin $866,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center to restore habitat in and alongside the Root River north of Lanesboro, Minnesota, and to conduct monitoring to ensure water quality and fish population improvements are achieved. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (d) Restoring Mussels in Streams and Lakes - Continuation new text end

new text begin $825,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to propagate, rear, and restore native freshwater mussel assemblages and the ecosystem services they provide in the Mississippi, Cedar, and Cannon Rivers; to evaluate reintroduction success; and to inform the public on mussels and mussel conservation. new text end

new text begin (e) Minnesota Million: Seedlings for Reforestation and CO2 Sequestration new text end

new text begin $906,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Duluth, to collaborate with The Nature Conservancy and Minnesota Extension to expand networks of seed collectors and tree growers and to research tree planting strategies to accelerate reforestation for carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, and watershed resilience. new text end

new text begin (f) Panoway on Wayzata Bay Shoreline Restoration Project new text end

new text begin $200,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Wayzata to restore native lake bottom and shoreline vegetation to improve shoreline stability, wildlife habitat, and the natural beauty of Lake Minnetonka's Wayzata Bay. The recipient must report to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources on the effectiveness of any new methods tested while conducting the project and may use a portion of the appropriation to prepare that report. new text end

new text begin (g) Pollinator Central III: Habitat Improvement with Community Monitoring new text end

new text begin $190,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to restore and enhance pollinator habitat in parks, schools, and other public spaces to benefit pollinators and people and to build knowledge about impacts of the pollinator plantings through community-based monitoring. new text end

new text begin (h) Restoring Forests and Savannas Using Silvopasture - Phase II new text end

new text begin $674,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to continue to partner with the University of Minnesota and the Sustainable Farming Association to demonstrate, evaluate, and increase adoption of the combined use of intensive tree, forage, and grazing as a method to restore and manage forest and savanna habitats. new text end

new text begin (i) Minnesota Community Schoolyards new text end

new text begin $1,433,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with The Trust for Public Land to engage students and communities to create nature-focused habitat improvements at schoolyards across the state to increase environmental outcomes and encourage outdoor learning. new text end

new text begin (j) Pollinator Enhancement and Mississippi River Shoreline Restoration new text end

new text begin $187,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the adjutant general of the Department of Military Affairs to restore native prairie, support pollinator plantings, and stabilize a large section of stream bank along the Mississippi River within Camp Ripley. new text end

new text begin (k) Conservation Cooperative for Working Lands new text end

new text begin $2,611,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pheasants Forever Inc. to collaborate with Natural Resources Conservation Service, Board of Water and Soil Resources, and Minnesota Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts to accelerate adoption of voluntary conservation practices on working lands in Minnesota by increasing technical assistance to farmers and landowners while also attracting federal matching funds. new text end

new text begin (l) Quantifying Environmental Benefits of Peatland Restoration in Minnesota new text end

new text begin $754,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to quantify the capacity of restored peatlands to store and accumulate atmospheric carbon and prevent release of accumulated mercury into the surrounding environment. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (m) Renewing Access to an Iconic North Shore Vista new text end

new text begin $197,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Superior Hiking Trail Association to use national trail design best practices to renew trails and a campground along the Bean and Bear Lakes section of the Superior Hiking Trail that provides access to one of Minnesota's most iconic vistas. new text end

new text begin (n) Addressing Erosion Along High Use River Loops new text end

new text begin $368,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Superior Hiking Trail Association to rehabilitate and renew popular river loops of the Superior Hiking Trail to withstand high visitor use and serve Minnesotans for years to come. new text end

new text begin (o) Pollinator Habitat Creation at Minnesota Closed Landfills new text end

new text begin $1,508,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct a pilot project to create pollinator habitat at closed landfill sites in the closed landfill program. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (p) Enhancing Habitat Connectivity within the Urban Mississippi Flyway new text end

new text begin $190,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to enhance and restore habitat in and between urban neighborhood parks and the Mississippi River to benefit animals, plants, and neighborhoods traditionally disconnected from nature and to raise awareness of the Mississippi River Flyway. new text end

new text begin (q) Statewide Diversion of Furniture and Mattress Waste Pilots new text end

new text begin $2,833,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with EMERGE Community Development to work collaboratively with the University of Minnesota, Second Chance Recycling, and local governments to test and implement methods to expand mattress and furniture recycling statewide, including by researching value-add commodity markets for recycled materials, piloting mattress collection in greater Minnesota counties, piloting curbside furniture collection in the metropolitan area, and increasing facility capacity to recycle collected mattresses. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project. This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10. new text end

new text begin (r) Phelps Mill Wetland and Prairie Restoration new text end

new text begin $974,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Otter Tail County to plan, engineer, and restore wetlands and prairie within the newly expanded Phelps Mill County Park to improve habitat connectivity for wildlife and enhance recreational experiences for users. Up to $322,000 of this appropriation may be used to plan, engineer, and construct a boardwalk, viewing platforms, and soft trails within the park. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin Subd. 9. new text end

new text begin Land Acquisition, Habitat, and Recreation new text end

new text begin 31,241,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) SNA Stewardship, Outreach, and Biodiversity Protection new text end

new text begin $1,919,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to restore and enhance exceptional habitat on scientific and natural areas (SNAs), increase public involvement and outreach, and strategically acquire lands that meet criteria for SNAs under Minnesota Statutes, section 86A.05, from willing sellers. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (b) Wannigan Regional Park Land Acquisition new text end

new text begin $727,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Frazee to acquire land for protecting and enhancing natural resources and for future development as Wannigan Regional Park, where the Heartland State, North Country National, and Otter Tail River Water Trails will meet. Initial site development or restoration work may be conducted with this appropriation. new text end

new text begin (c) Local Parks, Trails, and Natural Areas Grant Programs new text end

new text begin $3,802,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to solicit and rank applications and fund competitive matching grants for local parks, trail connections, and natural and scenic areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019. This appropriation is for local nature-based recreation, connections to regional and state natural areas, and recreation facilities and may not be used for athletic facilities such as sport fields, courts, and playgrounds. new text end

new text begin (d) Outreach and Stewardship Through the Native Prairie Bank Program new text end

new text begin $620,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to enhance and monitor lands enrolled in the native prairie bank and to provide outreach and technical assistance to landowners, practitioners, and the public to increase awareness and stewardship of the state's remaining native prairie. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (e) Minnesota State Trails Development new text end

new text begin $4,952,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to expand recreational opportunities on Minnesota state trails by rehabilitating and enhancing existing state trails and replacing or repairing existing state trail bridges. new text end

new text begin (f) Construction of East Park new text end

new text begin $700,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of St. Joseph to increase recreational opportunities and access at East Park along the Sauk River in St. Joseph through enhancements such as a canoe and kayak access, a floating dock, paved and mowed trails, and parking entrance improvements. new text end

new text begin (g) Scandia Gateway Trail to William O'Brien State Park new text end

new text begin $2,689,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Scandia to engineer and construct a segment of the Gateway State Trail between the city of Scandia and William O'Brien State Park that will be maintained by the Department of Natural Resources. The segment to be constructed includes a pedestrian tunnel and trailhead parking area. This project must be designed and constructed in accordance with Department of Natural Resources state trail standards. Engineering and construction plans must be approved by the commissioner of natural resources before construction may commence. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (h) Grand Marais Mountain Bike Trail Rehabilitation - Phase II new text end

new text begin $200,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Superior Cycling Association to rehabilitate and modify existing mountain bike trails at Pincushion Mountain to increase the trail's environmental sustainability and provide better access to beginner and adaptive cyclers. new text end

new text begin (i) Acquisition of State Parks and Trails Inholdings new text end

new text begin $5,425,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to acquire high-priority inholdings from willing sellers within the legislatively authorized boundaries of state parks, recreation areas, and trails to protect Minnesota's natural heritage, enhance outdoor recreation, and improve the efficiency of public land management. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered. new text end

new text begin (j) St. Louis River Re-Connect - Phase II new text end

new text begin $1,375,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Duluth to increase recreational opportunities and access to the Waabizheshikana hiking and water trails in West Duluth with trail and trailhead enhancements such as accessible canoe and kayak launches, picnic areas, and restrooms; restored habitat; stormwater improvements; directional signage, and trailside interpretation. This appropriation may also be used to partner with the St. Louis River Alliance to create an ambassadors program to engage the surrounding community and facilitate use of the trails. new text end

new text begin (k) City of Biwabik Recreation new text end

new text begin $1,306,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Biwabik to reconstruct and renovate Biwabik Recreation Area's access road, parking area, and bathroom facilities. new text end

new text begin (l) Silver Bay Multimodal Trailhead Project new text end

new text begin $1,970,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Silver Bay to develop a multimodal trailhead center to provide safe access to the Superior Hiking, Gitchi-Gami Bike, and C.J. Ramstad/North Shore trails; Black Beach Park; and other recreational destinations. Before any construction costs are incurred, the city must demonstrate that all funding to complete the project are secured. new text end

new text begin (m) Above the Falls Regional Park Restoration Planning and Acquisition new text end

new text begin $1,376,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to acquire land along the Mississippi River from willing sellers for habitat restoration, trail development, and low-intensity recreational facilities in Above the Falls Regional Park. This appropriation may also be used to prepare restoration plans for lands acquired. This appropriation may not be used to purchase habitable residential structures. Before the acquisition, a phase 1 environmental assessment must be completed and the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board must not accept any liability for previous contamination of lands acquired with this appropriation. new text end

new text begin (n) Redhead Mountain Bike Park new text end

new text begin $1,666,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Chisholm as the fiscal agent for the Minnesota Discovery Center to enhance outdoor recreational opportunities by adding trails and amenities to the Redhead Mountain Bike Park in Chisholm. Amenities may include such things as pump tracks, skills courses, changing stations, shade shakes, and signage. new text end

new text begin (o) Maplewood State Park Trail Segment of the Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail new text end

new text begin $2,514,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Otter Tail County to partner with the Department of Natural Resources to construct the Maplewood State Park segment of the Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail. This project must be designed and constructed in accordance with Department of Natural Resources state trail standards. Engineering and construction plans must be approved by the commissioner of natural resources before construction may commence. new text end

new text begin Subd. 10. new text end

new text begin Administration, Emerging Issues, and Contract Agreement Reimbursement new text end

new text begin 3,126,000 new text end new text begin -0- new text end
new text begin (a) LCCMR Administrative Budget new text end

new text begin $2,133,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources for administration in fiscal years 2024 and 2025 as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.09, subdivision 5. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025. Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.11, paragraph (b), Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.281, applies to this appropriation. new text end

new text begin (b) Emerging Issues new text end

new text begin $767,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources to an emerging issues account authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.08, subdivision 4, paragraph (d). new text end

new text begin (c) Contract Agreement Reimbursement new text end

new text begin $224,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources, at the direction of the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, for expenses incurred in preparing and administering contracts, including for the agreements specified in this section. new text end

new text begin (d) Legislative Coordinating Commission Legacy Website new text end

new text begin $2,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Legislative Coordinating Commission for the website required in Minnesota Statutes, section 3.303, subdivision 10. new text end

new text begin Subd. 11. new text end

new text begin Availability of Appropriations new text end

new text begin Money appropriated in this section may not be spent on activities unless they are directly related to and necessary for a specific appropriation and are specified in the work plan approved by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. Money appropriated in this section must not be spent on indirect costs or other institutional overhead charges that are not directly related to and necessary for a specific appropriation. Costs that are directly related to and necessary for an appropriation, including financial services, human resources, information services, rent, and utilities, are eligible only if the costs can be clearly justified and individually documented specific to the appropriation's purpose and would not be generated by the recipient but for receipt of the appropriation. No broad allocations for costs in either dollars or percentages are allowed. Unless otherwise provided, the amounts in this section are available for three years beginning July 1, 2023, and ending June 30, 2026, when projects must be completed and final products delivered. For acquisition of real property, the appropriations in this section are available for an additional fiscal year if a binding contract for acquisition of the real property is entered into before the expiration date of the appropriation. If a project receives a federal award, the period of the appropriation is extended to equal the federal award period to a maximum trust fund appropriation length of six years. new text end

new text begin Subd. 12. new text end

new text begin Data Availability Requirements Data new text end

new text begin Data collected by the projects funded under this section must conform to guidelines and standards adopted by Minnesota IT Services. Spatial data must also conform to additional guidelines and standards designed to support data coordination and distribution that have been published by the Minnesota Geospatial Information Office. Descriptions of spatial data must be prepared as specified in the state's geographic metadata guideline and must be submitted to the Minnesota Geospatial Information Office. All data must be accessible and free to the public unless made private under the Data Practices Act, Minnesota Statutes, chapter 13. To the extent practicable, summary data and results of projects funded under this section should be readily accessible on the Internet and identified as having received funding from the environment and natural resources trust fund. new text end

new text begin Subd. 13. new text end

new text begin Project Requirements new text end

new text begin (a) As a condition of accepting an appropriation under this section, an agency or entity receiving an appropriation or a party to an agreement from an appropriation must comply with paragraphs (b) to (l) and Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116P, and must submit a work plan and annual or semiannual progress reports in the form determined by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources for any project funded in whole or in part with funds from the appropriation. Modifications to the approved work plan and budget expenditures must be made through the amendment process established by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. new text end

new text begin (b) A recipient of money appropriated in this section that conducts a restoration using funds appropriated in this section must use native plant species according to the Board of Water and Soil Resources' native vegetation establishment and enhancement guidelines and include an appropriate diversity of native species selected to provide habitat for pollinators throughout the growing season as required under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.973. new text end

new text begin (c) For all restorations conducted with money appropriated under this section, a recipient must prepare an ecological restoration and management plan that, to the degree practicable, is consistent with the highest-quality conservation and ecological goals for the restoration site. Consideration should be given to soil, geology, topography, and other relevant factors that would provide the best chance for long-term success and durability of the restoration project. The plan must include the proposed timetable for implementing the restoration, including site preparation, establishment of diverse plant species, maintenance, and additional enhancement to establish the restoration; identify long-term maintenance and management needs of the restoration and how the maintenance, management, and enhancement will be financed; and take advantage of the best-available science and include innovative techniques to achieve the best restoration. new text end

new text begin (d) An entity receiving an appropriation in this section for restoration activities must provide an initial restoration evaluation at the completion of the appropriation and an evaluation three years after the completion of the expenditure. Restorations must be evaluated relative to the stated goals and standards in the restoration plan, current science, and, when applicable, the Board of Water and Soil Resources' native vegetation establishment and enhancement guidelines. The evaluation must determine whether the restorations are meeting planned goals, identify any problems with implementing the restorations, and, if necessary, give recommendations on improving restorations. The evaluation must be focused on improving future restorations. new text end

new text begin (e) All restoration and enhancement projects funded with money appropriated in this section must be on land permanently protected by a conservation easement or public ownership. new text end

new text begin (f) A recipient of money from an appropriation under this section must give consideration to contracting with Conservation Corps Minnesota for contract restoration and enhancement services. new text end

new text begin (g) All conservation easements acquired with money appropriated under this section must: new text end

new text begin (1) be permanent; new text end

new text begin (2) specify the parties to an easement in the easement; new text end

new text begin (3) specify all provisions of an agreement that are permanent; new text end

new text begin (4) be sent to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources in an electronic format at least ten business days before closing; new text end

new text begin (5) include a long-term monitoring and enforcement plan and funding for monitoring and enforcing the easement agreement; and new text end

new text begin (6) include requirements in the easement document to protect the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water through specific activities such as keeping water on the landscape, reducing nutrient and contaminant loading, and not permitting artificial hydrological modifications. new text end

new text begin (h) For any acquisition of lands or interest in lands, a recipient of money appropriated under this section must not agree to pay more than 100 percent of the appraised value for a parcel of land using this money to complete the purchase, in part or in whole, except that up to ten percent above the appraised value may be allowed to complete the purchase, in part or in whole, using this money if permission is received in advance of the purchase from the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. new text end

new text begin (i) For any acquisition of land or interest in land, a recipient of money appropriated under this section must give priority to high-quality natural resources or conservation lands that provide natural buffers to water resources. new text end

new text begin (j) For new lands acquired with money appropriated under this section, a recipient must prepare an ecological restoration and management plan in compliance with paragraph (c), including sufficient funding for implementation unless the work plan addresses why a portion of the money is not necessary to achieve a high-quality restoration. new text end

new text begin (k) To ensure public accountability for using public funds, a recipient of money appropriated under this section must, within 60 days of the transaction, provide to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources documentation of the selection process used to identify parcels acquired and provide documentation of all related transaction costs, including but not limited to appraisals, legal fees, recording fees, commissions, other similar costs, and donations. This information must be provided for all parties involved in the transaction. The recipient must also report to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources any difference between the acquisition amount paid to the seller and the state-certified or state-reviewed appraisal, if a state-certified or state-reviewed appraisal was conducted. new text end

new text begin (l) A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund under this section must acknowledge financial support from the environment and natural resources trust fund in project publications, signage, and other public communications and outreach related to work completed using the appropriation. Acknowledgment may occur, as appropriate, through use of the trust fund logo or inclusion of language attributing support from the trust fund. Each direct recipient of money appropriated in this section, as well as each recipient of a grant awarded pursuant to this section, must satisfy all reporting and other requirements incumbent upon constitutionally dedicated funding recipients as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 3.303, subdivision 10, and Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116P. new text end

new text begin (m) A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund under this section that is receiving funding to conduct children's services, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 299C.61, subdivision 7, must certify to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, as part of the required work plan, that criminal background checks for background check crimes, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 299C.61, subdivision 2, are performed on all employees, contractors, and volunteers that have or may have access to a child to whom the recipient provides children's services using the appropriation. new text end

new text begin Subd. 14. new text end

new text begin Payment Conditions and Capital Equipment Expenditures new text end

new text begin (a) All agreements, grants, or contracts referred to in this section must be administered on a reimbursement basis unless otherwise provided in this section. Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.41, expenditures made on or after July 1, 2023, or the date the work plan is approved, whichever is later, are eligible for reimbursement unless otherwise provided in this section. Periodic payments must be made upon receiving documentation that the deliverable items articulated in the approved work plan have been achieved, including partial achievements as evidenced by approved progress reports. Reasonable amounts may be advanced to projects to accommodate cash-flow needs or match federal money. The advances must be approved as part of the work plan. No expenditures for capital equipment are allowed unless expressly authorized in the project work plan. new text end

new text begin (b) Single-source contracts as specified in the approved work plan are allowed. new text end

new text begin Subd. 15. new text end

new text begin Purchasing Recycled and Recyclable Materials new text end

new text begin A political subdivision, public or private corporation, or other entity that receives an appropriation under this section must use the appropriation in compliance with Minnesota Statutes, section 16C.0725, regarding purchasing recycled, repairable, and durable materials, and Minnesota Statutes, section 16C.073, regarding purchasing and using paper stock and printing. new text end

new text begin Subd. 16. new text end

new text begin Energy Conservation and Sustainable Building Guidelines new text end

new text begin A recipient to whom an appropriation is made under this section for a capital improvement project must ensure that the project complies with the applicable energy conservation and sustainable building guidelines and standards contained in law, including Minnesota Statutes, sections 16B.325, 216C.19, and 216C.20, and rules adopted under those sections. The recipient may use the energy planning, advocacy, and State Energy Office units of the Department of Commerce to obtain information and technical assistance on energy conservation and alternative-energy development relating to planning and constructing the capital improvement project. new text end

new text begin Subd. 17. new text end

new text begin Accessibility new text end

new text begin Structural and nonstructural facilities must meet the design standards in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility guidelines. new text end

new text begin Subd. 18. new text end

new text begin Carryforward; Extensions new text end

new text begin The availability of the appropriations for the following projects is extended to June 30, 2024: new text end

new text begin (1) Laws 2018, chapter 214, article 4, section 2, subdivision 6, paragraph (a), Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center - Phase 4; new text end

new text begin (2) Laws 2018, chapter 214, article 4, section 2, subdivision 8, paragraph (e), Restoring Forests in Minnesota State Parks; new text end

new text begin (3) Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 2, section 2, subdivision 3, paragraph (d), Minnesota Trumpeter Swan Migration Ecology and Conservation; new text end

new text begin (4) Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 2, section 2, subdivision 8, paragraph (g), Agricultural Weed Control Using Autonomous Mowers; new text end

new text begin (5) Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 2, section 2, subdivision 10, paragraph (d), Grants Management System; and new text end

new text begin (6) Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 5, section 2, subdivision 10, Emerging Issues Account; Wastewater Renewable Energy Demonstration Grants. new text end

new text begin Subd. 19. new text end

new text begin Repurpose new text end

new text begin The unencumbered amount, estimated to be $176,000, in Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 6, section 2, subdivision 8, paragraph (f), Restoring Upland Forests for Birds, is for examining the impacts of neonicotinoid exposure on the reproduction and survival of Minnesota's game species, including deer and prairie chicken. This amount is in addition to the appropriation under article 1, section 3, subdivision 6, for these purposes and is available until June 30, 2027. new text end

Sec. 3.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.05, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Membership.

(a) A Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources of 17 members is created in the legislative branch, consisting of the chairs of the house of representatives and senate committees on environment and natural resources finance or designees appointed for the terms of the chairs, four members of the senate appointed by the Subcommittee on Committees of the Committee on Rules and Administration, and four members of the house of representatives appointed by the speaker.

(b) At least two members from the senate and two members from the house of representatives must be from the minority caucus. deleted text begin Members are entitled to reimbursement for per diem expenses plus travel expenses incurred in the services of the commission.deleted text end

(c) Seven citizens are members of the commission, five appointed by the governor, one appointed by the Senate Subcommittee on Committees of the Committee on Rules and Administration, and one appointed by the speaker of the house. The citizen members are selected and recommended to the appointing authorities according to subdivision 1a and must:

(1) have experience or expertise in the science, policy, or practice of the protection, conservation, preservation, and enhancement of the state's air, water, land, fish, wildlife, and other natural resources;

(2) have strong knowledge in the state's environment and natural resource issues around the state; deleted text begin anddeleted text end

(3) have demonstrated ability to work in a collaborative environmentnew text begin ; andnew text end

new text begin (4) not be a registered lobbyistnew text end .

(d) Members shall develop procedures to elect a chair that rotates between legislative and citizen members each meeting. A citizen member, a senate member, and a house of representatives member shall serve as chairs. The citizen members, senate members, and house of representatives members must select their respective chairs. The chair shall preside and convene meetings as often as necessary to conduct duties prescribed by this chapter.

(e) Appointed legislative members shall serve on the commission for two-year terms, beginning in January of each odd-numbered year and continuing through the end of December of the next even-numbered year. Appointed citizen members shall serve four-year terms, beginning in January of the first year and continuing through the end of December of the final year. Citizen and legislative members continue to serve until their successors are appointed.

(f) A citizen member may be removed by an appointing authority for cause. Vacancies occurring on the commission shall not affect the authority of the remaining members of the commission to carry out their duties, and vacancies shall be filled for the remainder of the term in the same manner under paragraphs (a) to (c).

(g) new text begin Legislative members are entitled to reimbursement for per diem expenses plus travel expenses incurred in the services of the commission. new text end Citizen members are entitled to per diem and reimbursement for expenses incurred in the services of the commission, as provided in section 15.059, subdivision 3new text begin , except that a citizen member may be compensated at the rate of up to $125 a daynew text end .

(h) The governor's appointments are subject to the advice and consent of the senate.new text begin One of the governor's appointments must be a member recommended by the Tribal government representatives of the Indian Affairs Council.new text end

new text begin (i) A citizen member may serve no more than eight years, except as necessary to fill a vacancy. A citizen member may not serve more than ten years if serving additional time to fill a vacancy. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2023, and applies to appointments made on or after that date. new text end

Sec. 4.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.05, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

Subd. 1a.

Citizen selection committee.

(a) The governor deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end appoint a Trust Fund Citizen Selection Committee of five members who come from different regions of the state and who have knowledge and experience of state environment and natural resource issuesnew text begin to provide recommendations for appointments under subdivision 1, paragraph (c)new text end .

(b) The duties of the Trust Fund Citizen Selection Committee deleted text begin shall bedeleted text end new text begin arenew text end to:

(1) identify citizen candidates to be members of the commission as part of the open appointments process under section 15.0597;

(2) request and review citizen candidate applications to be members of the commission; and

(3) interview the citizen candidates and recommend an adequate pool of candidates to be selected for commission membership by the governordeleted text begin , the senate, and the house of representativesdeleted text end .

(c) Membersnew text begin serve three-year terms andnew text end are entitled to deleted text begin travel expenses incurred to fulfill their duties under this subdivision as provided in section 15.059, subdivision 6deleted text end new text begin per diem and reimbursement for expenses incurred in the services of the committee, as provided in section 15.059, subdivision 3, except that a citizen selection committee member may be compensated at the rate of up to $125 a daynew text end .

new text begin (d) A member appointed under this subdivision may not be a registered lobbyist. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 5.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.05, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Duties.

(a) The commission deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end recommend an annual or biennial legislative bill for appropriations from the environment and natural resources trust fund and deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end adopt a strategic plan as provided in section 116P.08. new text begin Except as provided under section 116P.09, subdivision 6, paragraph (b), new text end approval of the recommended legislative bill requires an affirmative vote of at least deleted text begin 12deleted text end new text begin 11new text end members of the commission.

(b) It is a condition of acceptance of the appropriations made from the Minnesota environment and natural resources trust fund, and oil overcharge money under section 4.071, subdivision 2, that the agency or entity receiving the appropriation must submit a work plan and annual or semiannual progress reports in the form determined by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, and comply with applicable reporting requirements under section 116P.16. None of the money provided may be spent unless the commission has approved the pertinent work plan. Modifications to the approved work plan and budget expenditures deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be made through the amendment process established by the commission. The commission deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end ensure that the expenditures and outcomes described in the work plan for appropriations funded by the environment and natural resources trust fund are met.

(c) The peer review procedures created under section 116P.08 must also be used to review, comment, and report to the commission on research proposals applying for an appropriation from the oil overcharge money under section 4.071, subdivision 2.

(d) The commission may adopt operating procedures to fulfill its duties under this chapter.

(e) As part of the operating procedures, the commission deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end :

(1) ensure that members' expectations are to participate in all meetings related to funding decision recommendations;

(2) recommend adequate funding for increased citizen outreach and communications for trust fund expenditure planning;

(3) allow administrative expenses as part of individual project expenditures based on need;

(4) provide for project outcome evaluation;

(5) keep the grant application, administration, and review process as simple as possible; and

(6) define and emphasize the leveraging of additional sources of money that project proposers should consider when making trust fund proposals.

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2023. new text end

Sec. 6.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.09, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

Subd. 6.

Conflict of interest.

new text begin (a) new text end A commission member, a technical advisory committee member, a peer reviewer, or an employee of the commission may not participate in or vote on a decision of the commission, advisory committee, or peer review relating to an organization in which the member, peer reviewer, or employee has either a direct or indirect personal financial interest. While serving on the commission or technical advisory committee or as a peer reviewer or while an employee of the commission, a person deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end avoid any potential conflict of interest.

new text begin (b) A commission member may not vote on a motion regarding the final recommendations of the commission required under section 116P.05, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), if the motion relates to an organization in which the member has a direct personal financial interest. If a commission member is prohibited from voting under this paragraph, the number of affirmative votes required under section 116P.05, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), is reduced by the number of members ineligible to vote under this paragraph. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2023. new text end

Sec. 7.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.11, is amended to read:

116P.11 AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR DISBURSEMENT.

(a) The amount annually available from the trust fund for the legislative bill developed by the commission is as defined in the Minnesota Constitution, article XI, section 14.

(b) Any appropriated funds not encumbered deleted text begin in the biennium in which they are appropriateddeleted text end new text begin by the date the appropriation expiresnew text end cancel and must be credited to the principal of the trust fund.

Sec. 8.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.15, is amended to read:

116P.15 new text begin CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION AND new text end LAND ACQUISITION; RESTRICTIONS.

Subdivision 1.

Scope.

A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund or the Minnesota future resources fund who acquires an interest in real property with the appropriation must comply with deleted text begin this sectiondeleted text end new text begin subdivision 2new text end . deleted text begin For the purposes of this section, "interest in real property" includes, but is not limited to, an easement or fee title to property.deleted text end new text begin A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund who uses any portion of the appropriation for a capital construction project with a total cost of $10,000 or more must comply with subdivision 3.new text end

Subd. 2.

new text begin Land acquisition new text end restrictions; modification procedure.

(a) Annew text begin easement, fee title, or othernew text end interest in real property acquired with an appropriation from the trust fund or the Minnesota future resources fund must be used in perpetuity or for the specific term of an easement interest for the purpose for which the appropriation was made. The ownership of the interest in real property transfers to the state if: (1) the holder of the interest in real property fails to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement or work plan; or (2) restrictions are placed on the land that preclude its use for the intended purpose as specified in the appropriation.

(b) A recipient of funding who acquires an interest in real property subject to this section may not alter the intended use of the interest in real property or convey any interest in the real property acquired with the appropriation without the prior review and approval of the commission or its successor. The commission shall notify the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the trust fund or Minnesota future resources fund at least 15 business days before approval under this paragraph. The commission shall establish procedures to review requests from recipients to alter the use of or convey an interest in real property. These procedures shall allow for the replacement of the interest in real property with another interest in real property meeting the following criteria:

(1) the interest must be at least equal in fair market value, as certified by the commissioner of natural resources, to the interest being replaced; and

(2) the interest must be in a reasonably equivalent location, and have a reasonably equivalent useful conservation purpose compared to the interest being replaced, taking into consideration all effects from fragmentation of the whole habitat.

(c) A recipient of funding who acquires an interest in real property under paragraph (a) must separately record a notice of funding restrictions in the appropriate local government office where the conveyance of the interest in real property is filed. The notice of funding agreement must contain:

(1) a legal description of the interest in real property covered by the funding agreement;

(2) a reference to the underlying funding agreement;

(3) a reference to this section; and

(4) the following statement:

"This interest in real property shall be administered in accordance with the terms, conditions, and purposes of the grant agreement controlling the acquisition of the property. The interest in real property, or any portion of the interest in real property, shall not be sold, transferred, pledged, or otherwise disposed of or further encumbered without obtaining the prior written approval of the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources or its successor. The ownership of the interest in real property transfers to the state if: (1) the holder of the interest in real property fails to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement or work plan; or (2) restrictions are placed on the land that preclude its use for the intended purpose as specified in the appropriation."

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Capital construction restrictions; modification procedure. new text end

new text begin (a) A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund who uses the appropriation to wholly or partially construct a building, trail, campground, or other capital asset may not alter the intended use of the capital asset or convey any interest in the capital asset for 25 years from the date the project is completed without the prior review and approval of the commission or its successor. The commission must notify the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the trust fund at least 15 business days before approval under this paragraph. The commission must establish procedures to review requests from recipients to alter the use of or convey an interest in a capital asset under this paragraph. These procedures must require that: new text end

new text begin (1) the sale price must be at least fair market value; and new text end

new text begin (2) the trust fund must be repaid a portion of the sale price equal to the percentage of the total funding provided by the fund for constructing the capital asset. new text end

new text begin (b) The commission or its successor may waive the requirements under paragraph (a), clauses (1) and (2), by recommendation to the legislature if the transfer allows for a continued use of the asset in a manner consistent with the original appropriation purpose or with the purposes of the trust fund. new text end

new text begin (c) If both a capital asset and the real property on which the asset is located were wholly or partially purchased with an appropriation from the trust fund and the commission approves a request to alter the use of or convey an interest in the real property under subdivision 2, a separate approval under this subdivision to alter the use of the capital asset is not required. new text end

new text begin (d) A recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund who uses the appropriation to wholly or partially construct a building, trail, campground, or other capital asset must separately record a notice of funding restrictions in the appropriate local government office. The notice of funding restrictions must contain: new text end

new text begin (1) a legal description of the interest in real property covered by the funding agreement; new text end

new text begin (2) a reference to the underlying funding agreement; new text end

new text begin (3) a reference to this subdivision; and new text end

new text begin (4) the following statement: new text end

new text begin "This interest in real property must be administered in accordance with the terms, conditions, and purposes of the grant agreement controlling the improvement of the property. The interest in real property, or any portion of the interest in real property, must not be altered from its intended use or be sold, transferred, pledged, or otherwise disposed of or further encumbered without obtaining the prior written approval of the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources or its successor." new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025, and applies to money appropriated on or after that date. new text end

Sec. 9.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.16, is amended to read:

116P.16 REAL PROPERTY INTERESTS; REPORT.

(a) By December 1 each year, a recipient of an appropriation from the trust fund, that is used for the acquisition of an interest in real property, including, but not limited to, an easement or fee title, new text begin or for the construction of a building, trail, campground, or other capital asset with a total cost of $10,000 or more new text end must submit annual reports on the status of the real property to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources or its successor in a form determined by the commission. The responsibility for reporting under this section may be transferred by the recipient of the appropriation to another person who holds the interest in the real property. To complete the transfer of reporting responsibility, the recipient of the appropriation must:

(1) inform the person to whom the responsibility is transferred of that person's reporting responsibility;

(2) inform the person to whom the responsibility is transferred of the property restrictions under section 116P.15; and

(3) provide written notice to the commission of the transfer of reporting responsibility, including contact information for the person to whom the responsibility is transferred.

(b) After the transfer, the person who holds the interest in the real property is responsible for reporting requirements under this section.

new text begin (c) The annual reporting requirements on the status of a building, trail, campground, or other capital asset with a total cost of $10,000 or more and that was constructed with an appropriation from the trust fund expire 25 years after the date the final progress report under section 116P.05, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), is approved. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025, and applies to money appropriated on or after that date. new text end

Sec. 10.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116P.18, is amended to read:

116P.18 LANDS IN PUBLIC DOMAIN.

Money appropriated from the trust fund must not be used to purchase any land in fee title or a permanent conservation easement if the land in question is fully or partially owned by the state or a political subdivision of the state or was acquired fully or partially with state money, unless:

(1) the purchase creates additional direct benefit to the protection, conservation, preservation, and enhancement of the state's air, water, land, fish, wildlife, and other natural resources; and

(2) the purchase is approved, prior to the acquisition, by an affirmative vote of at least deleted text begin 12deleted text end new text begin 11new text end members of the commission.

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2023. new text end

Sec. 11.

new text begin [116P.21] ADDITIONAL CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT REQUIREMENTS. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Full funding. new text end

new text begin If an appropriation from the trust fund for a capital construction project or project phase is not alone sufficient to complete the project or project phase and a commitment from sources other than the trust fund is required: new text end

new text begin (1) the commitment must be in an amount that, when added to the appropriation from the trust fund, is sufficient to complete the project or project phase; and new text end

new text begin (2) the agency administering the appropriation from the trust fund must not distribute the money until the commitment is determined to be sufficient. In determining the sufficiency of a commitment under this clause, the agency must apply the standards and principles applied by the commissioner of management and budget under section 16A.502. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Match. new text end

new text begin A recipient of money appropriated from the trust fund for a capital construction project must provide a cash or in-kind match from nontrust fund sources of at least 25 percent of the total costs to complete the project or project phase. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Sustainable building guidelines. new text end

new text begin The sustainable building guidelines established under sections 16B.325 and 216B.241, subdivision 9, apply to new buildings and major renovations funded from the trust fund. A recipient of money appropriated from the trust fund for a new building or major renovation must ensure that the project complies with the guidelines. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Applicability. new text end

new text begin (a) Subdivisions 1, 2, and 3 do not apply to: new text end

new text begin (1) a capital construction project with a total cost of less than $10,000; or new text end

new text begin (2) a land acquisition project. new text end

new text begin (b) If land is acquired with trust fund money for the purpose of capital construction, the land acquisition is not exempted under paragraph (a), clause (2). new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Other capital construction statutes. new text end

new text begin The following statutes also apply to recipients of appropriations from the trust fund: sections 16B.32; 16B.326; 16B.335, subdivisions 3 and 4; 16C.054; 16C.16; 16C.28; 16C.285; 138.40; 138.665; 138.666; 177.41 to 177.44; and 471.345. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025, and applies to money appropriated on or after that date. new text end

Sec. 12.

Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 5, section 2, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

Subd. 9.

Land Acquisition, Habitat, and Recreation

-0- 29,901,000
(a) DNR Scientific and Natural Areas

$3,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for the scientific and natural area (SNA) program to restore, improve, and enhance wildlife habitat on SNAs; increase public involvement and outreach; and strategically acquire high-quality lands that meet criteria for SNAs under Minnesota Statutes, section 86A.05, from willing sellers.

(b) Private Native Prairie Conservation through Native Prairie Bank

$2,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to provide technical stewardship assistance to private landowners, restore and enhance native prairie protected by easements in the native prairie bank, and acquire easements for the native prairie bank in accordance with Minnesota Statutes, section 84.96, including preparing initial baseline property assessments. Up to $60,000 of this appropriation may be deposited in the natural resources conservation easement stewardship account, created in Minnesota Statutes, section 84.69, proportional to the number of easement acres acquired.

(c) Minnesota State Parks and State Trails Inholdings

$3,500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to acquire high-priority inholdings from willing sellers within the legislatively authorized boundaries of state parks, recreation areas, and trails to protect Minnesota's natural heritage, enhance outdoor recreation, and promote tourism.

(d) Grants for Local Parks, Trails, and Natural Areas

$2,400,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to solicit, rank, and fund competitive matching grants for local parks, trail connections, and natural and scenic areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019. This appropriation is for local nature-based recreation, connections to regional and state natural areas, and recreation facilities and may not be used for athletic facilities such as sport fields, courts, and playgrounds.

(e) Mississippi River Aquatic Habitat Restoration and Mussel Reintroduction

$1,800,000 the second year is from the trust fund. Of this amount, $1,549,000 is to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board and $251,000 is to the commissioner of natural resources to restore lost habitat and reintroduce mussels in the Mississippi River above St. Anthony Falls. This work includes creating habitat and species restoration plans, implementing the restoration plans, and monitoring effectiveness of the restoration for multiple years after implementation. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

(f) Minnesota Hunter Walking Trails: Public Land Recreational Access

$300,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Ruffed Grouse Society to improve Minnesota's hunter walking trail system by restoring or upgrading trailheads and trails, developing new walking trails, and compiling enhanced maps for use by managers and the public.

(g) Turning Back to Rivers: Environmental and Recreational Protection

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with The Trust for Public Land to help local communities acquire priority land along the Mississippi, St. Croix, and Minnesota Rivers and their tributaries to protect natural resources, provide buffers for flooding, and improve access for recreation.

(h) Metropolitan Regional Parks System Land Acquisition - Phase VI

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Metropolitan Council for grants to acquire land within the approved park boundaries of the metropolitan regional park system. This appropriation must be matched by at least 40 percent of nonstate money.

(i) Minnesota State Trails Development

$994,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to expand high-priority recreational opportunities on Minnesota's state trails by rehabilitating, improving, and enhancing existing state trails. The high-priority trail bridges to be rehabilitated or replaced under this appropriation include, but are not limited to, those on the Taconite, Great River Ridge, and C. J. Ramstad/Northshore State Trails.

(j) Elm Creek Restoration - Phase IV

$500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Champlin to conduct habitat and stream restoration of approximately 0.7 miles of Elm Creek shoreline above Mill Pond Lake and through the Elm Creek Protection Area.

(k) Superior Hiking Trail as Environmental Showcase

$450,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Superior Hiking Trail Association to rebuild damaged and dangerous segments and create a new trail segment of the Superior Hiking Trail to minimize environmental impacts, make the trail safer for users, and make the trail more resilient for future use and conditions.

(l) Upper St. Anthony Falls Enhancements

$2,800,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Friends of the Lock and Dam in partnership with the city of Minneapolis to design and install green infrastructure, public access, and habitat restorations on riverfront land at Upper St. Anthony Falls for water protection, recreation, and environmental education purposes. Of this amount, up to $600,000 is for planning, design, and engagement. No funds from this appropriation may be spent until Congress directs the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to convey an interest in the Upper St. Anthony Falls property to the city of Minneapolis for use as a visitor center. After this congressional act is signed into law, up to $100,000 of the planning, design, and engagement funds may be spent. The remaining planning, design, and engagement funds may be spent after a binding agreement has been secured to acquire the land or access and use rights to the land for at least 25 years. Any remaining balance of the appropriation may be spent on installing enhancements after the Upper St. Anthony Falls land has been acquired by the city of Minneapolis.

(m) Whiskey Creek and Mississippi River Water Quality, Habitat, and Recreation

$500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Mississippi Headwaters Board new text begin for the city of Baxter new text end to acquire deleted text begin and transfer approximately 13 acres ofdeleted text end land deleted text begin to the city of Baxterdeleted text end for future construction of water quality, habitat, and recreational improvements to protect the Mississippi River.

(n) Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail (West Segment)

$2,600,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Otter Tail County to construct the west segment of the 32-mile Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail that will connect the city of Pelican Rapids to Maplewood State Park.

(o) Crow Wing County Community Natural Area Acquisition

$400,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Crow Wing County to acquire approximately 65 acres of land adjacent to the historic fire tower property to allow for diverse recreational opportunities while protecting wildlife habitat and preventing forest fragmentation. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

(p) Rocori Trail - Phase III

$1,200,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Rocori Trail Construction Board to design and construct Phase III of the Rocori Trail along the old Burlington Northern Santa Fe rail corridor between the cities of Cold Spring and Rockville.

(q) Mesabi Trail: New Trail and Additional Funding

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the St. Louis and Lake Counties Regional Railroad Authority for constructing the Mesabi Trail beginning at the intersection of County Road 20 and Minnesota State Highway 135 and terminating at 1st Avenue North and 1st Street North in the city of Biwabik in St. Louis County. This appropriation may not be spent until all Mesabi Trail projects funded with trust fund appropriations before fiscal year 2020, with the exception of the project funded under Laws 2017, chapter 96, section 2, subdivision 9, paragraph (g), are completed.

(r) Ranier Safe Harbor and Transient Dock on Rainy Lake

$762,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Ranier to construct a dock that accommodates boats 26 feet or longer with the goal of increasing public access for boat recreation on Rainy Lake. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

(s) Crane Lake Voyageurs National Park Campground and Visitor Center

$3,100,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the town of Crane Lake to design and construct a new campground and to plan and preliminarily prepare a site for constructing a new Voyageurs National Park visitor center on land acquired for these purposes in Crane Lake. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

(t) Chippewa County Acquisition, Recreation, and Education

$160,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Chippewa County to acquire wetland and floodplain forest and abandoned gravel pits along the Minnesota River to provide water filtration, education, and recreational opportunities.

(u) Sportsmen's Training and Developmental Learning Center

$85,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minnesota Forest Zone Trappers Association to complete a site evaluation and master plan for the Sportsmen's Training and Developmental Learning Center near Hibbing. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

(v) Birch Lake Recreation Area

$350,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for a grant to the city of Babbitt to expand the Birch Lake Recreation Area by adding a new campground to include new campsites, restrooms, and other facilities. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.

Sec. 13.

Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Environmental Education

-0- 4,269,000
(a) Teacher Field School: Stewardship through Nature-Based Education

$500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Hamline University to create an immersive, research-backed field school for teachers to use nature-based education to benefit student well-being and academic outcomes while increasing stewardship habits.

(b) Increasing K-12 Student Learning to Develop Environmental Awareness, Appreciation, and Interest

$1,602,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Osprey Wilds Environmental Learning Center to partner with Minnesota's five other accredited residential environmental learning centers to provide needs-based scholarships to deleted text begin at least 25,000deleted text end K-12 students statewide for immersive multiday environmental learning experiences.

(c) Expanding Access to Wildlife Learning Bird by Bird

$276,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to engage young people from diverse communities in wildlife conservation through bird-watching in schools, outdoor leadership training, and participating in neighborhood bird walks.

(d) Engaging a Diverse Public in Environmental Stewardship

$300,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to increase participation in natural resources restoration efforts through volunteer, internship, and youth engagement activities that target diverse audiences more accurately reflecting local demographic and socioeconomic conditions in Minnesota.

(e) Bugs Below Zero: Engaging Citizens in Winter Research

$198,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to raise awareness about the winter life of bugs, inspire learning about stream food webs, and engage citizen scientists in research and environmental stewardship.

(f) ESTEP: Earth Science Teacher Education Project

$495,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minnesota Science Teachers Association to provide professional development for Minnesota science teachers in environmental and earth science to strengthen environmental education in schools.

(g) YES! Students Take Action to Complete Eco Projects

$199,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Prairie Woods Environmental Learning Center, in partnership with Ney Nature Center and Laurentian Environmental Center, to empower Minnesota youth to connect with natural resource experts, identify ecological challenges, and take action to complete innovative projects in their communities.

(h) Increasing Diversity in Environmental Careers

$500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources, in cooperation with Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa, to encourage a diversity of students to pursue careers in the environment and natural resources through internships, mentorships, and fellowships with the Department of Natural Resources, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and the Pollution Control Agency.

(i) Diversity and Access to Wildlife-Related Opportunities

$199,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to broaden the state's conservation constituency by researching diverse communities' values about nature and wildlife experiences and identifying barriers to engagement.

Sec. 14.

Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

Subd. 8.

Methods to Protect, Restore, and Enhance Land, Water, and Habitat

-0- 11,294,000
(a) Minnesota's Volunteer Rare Plant Conservation Corps

$859,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum to partner with the Department of Natural Resources and the Minnesota Native Plant Society to establish and train a volunteer corps to survey, monitor, and bank seed from Minnesota's rare plant populations and enhance the effectiveness and efficiencies of conservation efforts.

(b) Conservation Corps Veterans Service Corps Program

$1,339,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Conservation Corps Minnesota to create a Veterans Service Corps program to accelerate natural resource restorations in Minnesota while providing workforce development opportunities for the state's veterans.

(c) Creating Seed Sources of Early-Blooming Plants for Pollinators

$200,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to establish new populations of early-season flowers by hand-harvesting and propagating species that are currently lacking in prairie restorations and that are essential to pollinator health. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

(d) Hastings Lake Rebecca Park Area

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Hastings to develop an ecological-based master plan for Lake Rebecca Park and to enhance habitat quality and construct passive recreational facilities consistent with the master plan. No funds for implementation may be spent until the master plan is complete.

(e) Pollinator Plantings and the Redistribution of Soil Toxins

$610,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to map urban and suburban soil toxins of concern, such as heavy metals and microplastics, and to test whether pollinator plantings can redistribute these toxins in the soil of yards, parks, and community gardens and reduce exposure to humans and wildlife.

(f) PFAS Fungal-Wood Chip Filtering System

$189,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to identify, develop, and field-test various types of waste wood chips and fungi to sequester and degrade PFAS leachate from contaminated waste sites. This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

(g) Phytoremediation for Extracting Deicing Salt

$451,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to protect lands and waters from contamination by collaborating with the Department of Transportation to develop methods for using native plants to remediate roadside deicing salt.

(h) Mustinka River Fish and Wildlife Habitat Corridor Rehabilitation

$2,692,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Bois de Sioux Watershed District to permanently rehabilitate a straightened reach of the Mustinka River to a naturally functioning stream channel and floodplain corridor for water, fish, and wildlife benefits.

(i) Bohemian Flats Savanna Restoration

$286,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to restore an area of compacted urban turf within Bohemian Flats Park and adjacent to the Mississippi River to an oak savanna ecosystem.

(j) Watershed and Forest Restoration: What a Match!

$3,318,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the Board of Water and Soil Resources, in cooperation with soil and water conservation districts, the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe, and the Department of Natural Resources, new text begin to acquire interests in land and new text end to accelerate tree planting on deleted text begin privately owned,deleted text end protected lands for water-quality protection and carbon sequestration.new text begin Notwithstanding subdivision 14, paragraph (e), this appropriation may be spent to reforest lands protected through long-term contracts as provided in the approved work plan.new text end

(k) River Habitat Restoration and Recreation in Melrose

$350,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Melrose to conduct habitat restoration and create fishing, canoeing, and camping opportunities along a segment of the Sauk River within the city of Melrose and to provide public education about stream restoration, fish habitat, and the importance of natural areas.

Sec. 15.

Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

Subd. 9.

Habitat and Recreation

-0- 26,179,000
(a) Mesabi Trail: Wahlsten Road (CR 26) deleted text begin todeleted text end new text begin towardnew text end Tower

$1,307,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the St. Louis and Lake Counties Regional Railroad Authority to acquire easements, engineer, and construct a segment of the Mesabi Trail beginning at the intersection of Wahlsten Road (CR 26) and Benson Road in Embarrass and extending deleted text begin todeleted text end new text begin towardnew text end Tower.

(b) Environmental Learning Classroom with Trails

$82,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Mountain Iron-Buhl Public Schools to build an outdoor classroom pavilion, accessible trails, and a footbridge within the Mountain Iron-Buhl School Forest to conduct environmental education that cultivates a lasting conservation ethic.

(c) Local Parks, Trails, and Natural Areas Grant Programs

$3,560,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to solicit, rank, and fund competitive matching grants for local parks, trail connections, and natural and scenic areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019. This appropriation is for local nature-based recreation, connections to regional and state natural areas, and recreation facilities and may not be used for athletic facilities such as sport fields, courts, and playgrounds.

(d) St. Louis River Re-Connect

$500,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Duluth to expand recreational access along the St. Louis River and estuary by implementing the St. Louis River National Water Trail outreach plan, designing and constructing upgrades and extensions to the Waabizheshikana Trail, and installing interpretive features that describe the cultural and ecological significance of the area.

(e) Native Prairie Stewardship and Prairie Bank Easement Acquisition

$1,353,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to provide technical stewardship assistance to private landowners, restore and enhance native prairie protected by easements in the native prairie bank, and acquire easements for the native prairie bank in accordance with Minnesota Statutes, section 84.96, including preparing initial baseline property assessments. Up to $60,000 of this appropriation may be deposited in the natural resources conservation easement stewardship account created under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.69, proportional to the number of easements acquired.

(f) Minnesota State Parks and State Trails Maintenance and Development

$1,600,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for maintenance and development at state parks, recreation areas, and trails to protect Minnesota's natural heritage, enhance outdoor recreation, and improve the efficiency of public land management.

(g) Minnesota State Trails Development

$7,387,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to expand recreational opportunities on Minnesota state trails by rehabilitating and enhancing existing state trails and replacing or repairing existing state trail bridges.

(h) SNA Habitat Restoration and Public Engagement

$5,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for the scientific and natural areas (SNA) program to restore and enhance exceptional habitat on SNAs and increase public involvement and outreach.

(i) The Missing Link: Gull Lake Trail, Fairview Township

$1,394,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Fairview Township to complete the Gull Lake Trail by engineering and constructing the trail's final segment through Fairview Township in the Brainerd Lakes area.

(j) Silver Bay Multimodal Trailhead Project

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Silver Bay to develop a multimodal trailhead center to provide safe access to the Superior, Gitchi-Gami, and C.J. Ramstad/North Shore trails; Black Beach Park; and other recreational destinations.

(k) Brookston Campground, Boat Launch, and Outdoor Recreational Facility

$453,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Brookston to build a campground, boat launch, and outdoor recreation area on the banks of the St. Louis River in northeastern Minnesota. Before any trust fund dollars are spent, the city must demonstrate that all funds to complete the project are secured and a fiscal agent must be approved in the work plan.

(l) Silver Lake Trail Connection

$727,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Virginia to design, engineer, and construct a multiuse trail that will connect Silver Lake Trail to a new Miners Entertainment and Convention Center and provide lighting on Bailey Lake Trail.

(m) Floodwood Campground Improvement Project

$816,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Floodwood to upgrade the Floodwood Campground and connecting trails to provide high-quality nature and recreation experience for people of all ages.

(n) Ranier Safe Harbor/Transient Dock - Phase 2

$1,000,000 the second year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Ranier to construct a safe harbor and transient dock to accommodate watercraft of many sizes to improve public access for boat recreation on Rainy Lake. Before trust fund dollars are spent, a fiscal agent must be approved in the work plan. Before any trust fund dollars are spent, the city must demonstrate that all funds to complete the project are secured. Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

Sec. 16.

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin Unless otherwise provided, this article is effective the day following final enactment. new text end

ARTICLE 3

POLLUTION CONTROL

Section 1.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 8a. new text end

new text begin Microplastics. new text end

new text begin "Microplastics" means particles of plastic less than 500 micrometers in size. new text end

Sec. 2.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 8b. new text end

new text begin Nanoplastics. new text end

new text begin "Nanoplastics" means plastic particles less than or equal to 100 nanometers in size. new text end

Sec. 3.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 10a. new text end

new text begin Plastic. new text end

new text begin "Plastic" means a synthetic material made from linking monomers through a chemical reaction to create a polymer chain that can be molded or extruded at high heat into various solid forms that retain their defined shapes during their life cycle and after disposal. Plastic does not mean natural polymers that have not been chemically modified. new text end

Sec. 4.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115.03, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Generally.

new text begin (a) new text end The deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end is deleted text begin herebydeleted text end given and charged with the following powers and duties:

deleted text begin (a)deleted text end new text begin (1) new text end to administer and enforce all laws relating to the pollution of any of the waters of the state;

deleted text begin (b)deleted text end new text begin (2) new text end to investigate the extent, character, and effect of the pollution of the waters of this state and to gather data and information necessary or desirable in the administration or enforcement of pollution laws, and to make such classification of the waters of the state as it may deem advisable;

deleted text begin (c)deleted text end new text begin (3)new text end to establish and alter such reasonable pollution standards for any waters of the state in relation to the public use to which they are or may be put as it shall deem necessary for the purposes of this chapter and, with respect to the pollution of waters of the state, chapter 116;

deleted text begin (d)deleted text end new text begin (4)new text end to encourage waste treatment, including advanced waste treatment, instead of stream low-flow augmentation for dilution purposes to control and prevent pollution;

deleted text begin (e)deleted text end new text begin (5)new text end to adopt, issue, reissue, modify, deny, or revoke, enter into or enforce reasonable orders, permits, variances, standards, rules, schedules of compliance, and stipulation agreements, under such conditions as it may prescribe, in order to prevent, control or abate water pollution, or for the installation or operation of disposal systems or parts thereof, or for other equipment and facilities:

deleted text begin (1)deleted text end new text begin (i)new text end requiring the discontinuance of the discharge of sewage, industrial waste or other wastes into any waters of the state resulting in pollution in excess of the applicable pollution standard established under this chapter;

deleted text begin (2)deleted text end new text begin (ii)new text end prohibiting or directing the abatement of any discharge of sewage, industrial waste, or other wastes, into any waters of the state or the deposit thereof or the discharge into any municipal disposal system where the same is likely to get into any waters of the state in violation of this chapter and, with respect to the pollution of waters of the state, chapter 116, or standards or rules promulgated or permits issued pursuant thereto, and specifying the schedule of compliance within which such prohibition or abatement must be accomplished;

deleted text begin (3)deleted text end new text begin (iii)new text end prohibiting the storage of any liquid or solid substance or other pollutant in a manner which does not reasonably assure proper retention against entry into any waters of the state that would be likely to pollute any waters of the state;

deleted text begin (4)deleted text end new text begin (iv)new text end requiring the construction, installation, maintenance, and operation by any person of any disposal system or any part thereof, or other equipment and facilities, or the reconstruction, alteration, or enlargement of its existing disposal system or any part thereof, or the adoption of other remedial measures to prevent, control or abate any discharge or deposit of sewage, industrial waste or other wastes by any person;

deleted text begin (5)deleted text end new text begin (v)new text end establishing, and from time to time revising, standards of performance for new sources taking into consideration, among other things, classes, types, sizes, and categories of sources, processes, pollution control technology, cost of achieving such effluent reduction, and any nonwater quality environmental impact and energy requirements. Said standards of performance for new sources shall encompass those standards for the control of the discharge of pollutants which reflect the greatest degree of effluent reduction which the agency determines to be achievable through application of the best available demonstrated control technology, processes, operating methods, or other alternatives, including, where practicable, a standard permitting no discharge of pollutants. New sources shall encompass buildings, structures, facilities, or installations from which there is or may be the discharge of pollutants, the construction of which is commenced after the publication by the agency of proposed rules prescribing a standard of performance which will be applicable to such source. Notwithstanding any other provision of the law of this state, any point source the construction of which is commenced after May 20, 1973, and which is so constructed as to meet all applicable standards of performance for new sources shall, consistent with and subject to the provisions of section 306(d) of the Amendments of 1972 to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, not be subject to any more stringent standard of performance for new sources during a ten-year period beginning on the date of completion of such construction or during the period of depreciation or amortization of such facility for the purposes of section 167 or 169, or both, of the Federal Internal Revenue Code of 1954, whichever period ends first. Construction shall encompass any placement, assembly, or installation of facilities or equipment, including contractual obligations to purchase such facilities or equipment, at the premises where such equipment will be used, including preparation work at such premises;

deleted text begin (6)deleted text end new text begin (vi)new text end establishing and revising pretreatment standards to prevent or abate the discharge of any pollutant into any publicly owned disposal system, which pollutant interferes with, passes through, or otherwise is incompatible with such disposal system;

deleted text begin (7)deleted text end new text begin (vii)new text end requiring the owner or operator of any disposal system or any point source to establish and maintain such records, make such reports, install, use, and maintain such monitoring equipment or methods, including where appropriate biological monitoring methods, sample such effluents in accordance with such methods, at such locations, at such intervals, and in such a manner as the agency shall prescribe, and providing such other information as the agency may reasonably require;

deleted text begin (8)deleted text end new text begin (viii)new text end notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, and with respect to the pollution of waters of the state, chapter 116, requiring the achievement of more stringent limitations than otherwise imposed by effluent limitations in order to meet any applicable water quality standard by establishing new effluent limitations, based upon section 115.01, subdivision 13, clause (b), including alternative effluent control strategies for any point source or group of point sources to insure the integrity of water quality classifications, whenever the agency determines that discharges of pollutants from such point source or sources, with the application of effluent limitations required to comply with any standard of best available technology, would interfere with the attainment or maintenance of the water quality classification in a specific portion of the waters of the state. Prior to establishment of any such effluent limitation, the agency shall hold a public hearing to determine the relationship of the economic and social costs of achieving such limitation or limitations, including any economic or social dislocation in the affected community or communities, to the social and economic benefits to be obtained and to determine whether or not such effluent limitation can be implemented with available technology or other alternative control strategies. If a person affected by such limitation demonstrates at such hearing that, whether or not such technology or other alternative control strategies are available, there is no reasonable relationship between the economic and social costs and the benefits to be obtained, such limitation shall not become effective and shall be adjusted as it applies to such person;

deleted text begin (9)deleted text end new text begin (ix)new text end modifying, in its discretion, any requirement or limitation based upon best available technology with respect to any point source for which a permit application is filed after July 1, 1977, upon a showing by the owner or operator of such point source satisfactory to the agency that such modified requirements will represent the maximum use of technology within the economic capability of the owner or operator and will result in reasonable further progress toward the elimination of the discharge of pollutants; and

deleted text begin (10)deleted text end new text begin (x)new text end requiring that applicants for wastewater discharge permits evaluate in their applications the potential reuses of the discharged wastewater;

deleted text begin (f)deleted text end new text begin (6)new text end to require to be submitted and to approve plans and specifications for disposal systems or point sources, or any part thereof and to inspect the construction thereof for compliance with the approved plans and specifications thereof;

deleted text begin (g)deleted text end new text begin (7)new text end to prescribe and alter rules, not inconsistent with law, for the conduct of the agency and other matters within the scope of the powers granted to and imposed upon it by this chapter and, with respect to pollution of waters of the state, in chapter 116, provided that every rule affecting any other department or agency of the state or any person other than a member or employee of the agency shall be filed with the secretary of state;

deleted text begin (h)deleted text end new text begin (8)new text end to conduct such investigations, issue such notices, public and otherwise, and hold such hearings as are necessary or which it may deem advisable for the discharge of its duties under this chapter and, with respect to the pollution of waters of the state, under chapter 116, including, but not limited to, the issuance of permits, and to authorize any member, employee, or agent appointed by it to conduct such investigations or, issue such notices and hold such hearings;

deleted text begin (i)deleted text end new text begin (9)new text end for the purpose of water pollution control planning by the state and pursuant to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, to establish and revise planning areas, adopt plans and programs and continuing planning processes, including, but not limited to, basin plans and areawide waste treatment management plans, and to provide for the implementation of any such plans by means of, including, but not limited to, standards, plan elements, procedures for revision, intergovernmental cooperation, residual treatment process waste controls, and needs inventory and ranking for construction of disposal systems;

deleted text begin (j)deleted text end new text begin (10)new text end to train water pollution control personneldeleted text begin ,deleted text end and charge deleted text begin suchdeleted text end new text begin training new text end fees deleted text begin therefordeleted text end as are necessary to cover the agency's costs. All such fees received deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be paid into the state treasury and credited to the Pollution Control Agency training account;

new text begin (11) to provide chloride reduction training and charge training fees as necessary to cover the agency's costs not to exceed $350. All training fees received must be paid into the state treasury and credited to the Pollution Control Agency training account; new text end

deleted text begin (k)deleted text end new text begin (12)new text end to impose as additional conditions in permits to publicly owned disposal systems appropriate measures to insure compliance by industrial and other users with any pretreatment standard, including, but not limited to, those related to toxic pollutants, and any system of user charges ratably as is hereby required under state law or said Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, or any regulations or guidelines promulgated thereunder;

deleted text begin (l)deleted text end new text begin (13)new text end to set a period not to exceed five years for the duration of any national pollutant discharge elimination system permit or not to exceed ten years for any permit issued as a state disposal system permit only;

deleted text begin (m)deleted text end new text begin (14)new text end to require each governmental subdivision identified as a permittee for a wastewater treatment works to evaluate in every odd-numbered year the condition of its existing system and identify future capital improvements that will be needed to attain or maintain compliance with a national pollutant discharge elimination system or state disposal system permit; and

deleted text begin (n)deleted text end new text begin (15)new text end to train subsurface sewage treatment system personnel, including persons who design, construct, install, inspect, service, and operate subsurface sewage treatment systems, and charge fees as necessary to pay the agency's costs. All fees received must be paid into the state treasury and credited to the agency's training account. Money in the account is appropriated to the agency to pay expenses related to training.

new text begin (b) new text end The information required innew text begin paragraph (a),new text end clause deleted text begin (m)deleted text end new text begin (14),new text end must be submitted in every odd-numbered year to the commissioner on a form provided by the commissioner. The commissioner shall provide technical assistance if requested by the governmental subdivision.

new text begin (c) new text end The powers and duties given the agency in this subdivision also apply to permits issued under chapter 114C.

Sec. 5.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115.061, is amended to read:

115.061 DUTY TO NOTIFY; AVOIDING WATER POLLUTION.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), it is the duty of every person to notify the agency immediately of the discharge, accidental or otherwise, of any substance or material under its control which, if not recovered, may cause pollution of waters of the state, and the responsible person shall recover as rapidly and as thoroughly as possible such substance or material and take immediately such other action as may be reasonably possible to minimize or abate pollution of waters of the state caused thereby.

(b) Notification is not required under paragraph (a) for a discharge of five gallons or less of petroleum, as defined in section 115C.02, subdivision 10. This paragraph does not affect the other requirements of paragraph (a).

new text begin (c) Promptly after notifying the agency of a discharge under paragraph (a), a publicly owned treatment works or a publicly or privately owned domestic sewer system owner must provide notice to the potentially impacted public and to any downstream drinking water facility that may be impacted by the discharge. Notice to the public and to any drinking water facility must be made using the most efficient communications system available to the facility owner such as in person, telephone call, radio, social media, web page, or another expedited form. In addition, signage must be posted at all impacted public use areas within the same jurisdiction or notification must be provided to the entity that has jurisdiction over any impacted public use areas. A notice under this paragraph must include the date and time of the discharge, a description of the material released, a warning of the potential public health risk, and the permittee's contact information. new text end

new text begin (d) The agency must provide guidance that includes but is not limited to methods and protocols for providing timely notice under this section. new text end

Sec. 6.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.03, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 10b. new text end

new text begin Environmental justice area. new text end

new text begin "Environmental justice area" means one or more census tracts in Minnesota: new text end

new text begin (1) in which, based on the most recent decennial census data published by the United States Census Bureau: new text end

new text begin (i) 40 percent or more of the population is nonwhite; new text end

new text begin (ii) 35 percent or more of the households have an income at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level; or new text end

new text begin (iii) 40 percent or more of the population over the age of five has limited English proficiency; or new text end

new text begin (2) located within Indian Country, as defined under United States Code, title 18, section 1151. new text end

Sec. 7.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.03, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 37a. new text end

new text begin Waste treated seed. new text end

new text begin "Waste treated seed" means seed that is treated, as defined in section 21.81, subdivision 28, and that is withdrawn from sale or that the end user considers unusable or otherwise a waste. new text end

Sec. 8.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.1415, is amended to read:

115A.1415 ARCHITECTURAL PAINT; PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM; STEWARDSHIP PLAN.

Subdivision 1.

Definitions.

For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given:

new text begin (1) "annual operating expenses" means the total amount of a producer's or stewardship organization's expenses in a calendar year for developing a stewardship plan, operating and administering the program in accordance with the stewardship plan, and meeting the requirements of this section, determined at the time the annual report required under subdivision 12 is submitted; new text end

deleted text begin (1)deleted text end new text begin (2)new text end "architectural paint" means interior and exterior architectural coatings sold in containers of five gallons or less. Architectural paint does not include industrial coatings, original equipment coatings, or specialty coatings;

deleted text begin (2)deleted text end new text begin (3)new text end "brand" means a name, symbol, word, or mark that identifies architectural paint, rather than its components, and attributes the paint to the owner or licensee of the brand as the producer;

deleted text begin (3)deleted text end new text begin (4)new text end "discarded paint" means architectural paint that is no longer used for its manufactured purpose;

deleted text begin (4)deleted text end new text begin (5)new text end "producer" means a person that:

(i) has legal ownership of the brand, brand name, or cobrand of architectural paint sold in the state;

(ii) imports architectural paint branded by a producer that meets item (i) when the producer has no physical presence in the United States;

(iii) if items (i) and (ii) do not apply, makes unbranded architectural paint that is sold in the state; or

(iv) sells architectural paint at wholesale or retail, does not have legal ownership of the brand, and elects to fulfill the responsibilities of the producer for the architectural paint by certifying that election in writing to the commissioner;

deleted text begin (5)deleted text end new text begin (6)new text end "recycling" means the process of collecting and preparing recyclable materials and reusing the materials in their original form or using them in manufacturing processes that do not cause the destruction of recyclable materials in a manner that precludes further use;

deleted text begin (6)deleted text end new text begin (7)new text end "retailer" means any person who offers architectural paint for sale at retail in the state;

deleted text begin (7)deleted text end new text begin (8)new text end "reuse" means donating or selling collected architectural paint back into the market for its original intended use, when the architectural paint retains its original purpose and performance characteristics;

deleted text begin (8)deleted text end new text begin (9)new text end "sale" or "sell" means transfer of title of architectural paint for consideration, including a remote sale conducted through a sales outlet, catalog, website, or similar electronic means. Sale or sell includes a lease through which architectural paint is provided to a consumer by a producer, wholesaler, or retailer;

deleted text begin (9)deleted text end new text begin (10)new text end "stewardship assessment" means the amount added to the purchase price of architectural paint sold in the state deleted text begin that is necessary to cover the cost of collecting, transporting, and processing postconsumer architectural paint by the producer or stewardship organization pursuant to a product stewardship programdeleted text end new text begin to implement a product stewardship program according to an approved stewardship plannew text end ;

deleted text begin (10)deleted text end new text begin (11)new text end "stewardship organization" means an organization appointed by one or more producers to act as an agent on behalf of the producer to design, submit, and administer a product stewardship program under this section; and

deleted text begin (11)deleted text end new text begin (12)new text end "stewardship plan" means a detailed plan describing the manner in which a product stewardship program under subdivision 2 will be implemented.

Subd. 2.

Product stewardship program.

For architectural paint sold in the state, producers must, individually or through a stewardship organization, implement and finance a statewide product stewardship program that manages the architectural paint by reducing the paint's waste generation, promoting its reuse and recycling, and providing for negotiation and execution of agreements to collect, transport, and process the architectural paint for end-of-life recycling and reuse.

Subd. 3.

Participation required to sell.

(a) deleted text begin On and after July 1, 2014, or three months after program plan approval, whichever is sooner,deleted text end No producer, wholesaler, or retailer may sell or offer for sale in the state architectural paint unless the paint's producer participates in an approved stewardship plan, either individually or through a stewardship organization.

(b) Each producer must operate a product stewardship program approved by the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end or enter into an agreement with a stewardship organization to operate, on the producer's behalf, a product stewardship program approved by the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end .

Subd. 4.

Stewardship plan required.

(a) deleted text begin On or before March 1, 2014, anddeleted text end Before offering architectural paint for sale in the state, a producer must submit a stewardship plan to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end and receive approval of the plan or must submit documentation to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end that demonstrates the producer has entered into an agreement with a stewardship organization to be an active participant in an approved product stewardship program as described in subdivision 2. A stewardship plan must include all elements required under subdivision 5.

(b) deleted text begin Andeleted text end new text begin A proposednew text end amendment to the plan, if determined necessary by the commissioner, must be submitted new text begin to the commissioner for review and approval or rejection new text end every five years.

(c) deleted text begin It is the responsibility ofdeleted text end The entities responsible for each stewardship plan deleted text begin todeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end notify the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end within 30 days of any significant new text begin proposed new text end changes deleted text begin or modificationsdeleted text end to the plan or its implementation. Within 30 days of the notification, a written new text begin proposed new text end plan deleted text begin revisiondeleted text end new text begin amendmentnew text end must be submitted to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end for review and approvalnew text begin or rejectionnew text end .

Subd. 5.

Plan content.

A stewardship plan must contain:

(1) certification that the product stewardship program will accept all discarded paint regardless of which producer produced the architectural paint and its individual components;

(2) contact information for the individual and the entity submitting the new text begin stewardship new text end plan, a list of all producers participating in the product stewardship program, and the brands covered by the product stewardship program;

(3) a description of the methods by which the discarded paint will be collected in all areas in the state without relying on end-of-life fees, including an explanation of how the collection system will be convenient and adequate to serve the needs of small businesses and residents in both urban and rural areas on an ongoing basis and a discussion of how the existing household hazardous waste infrastructure will be considered when selecting collection sites;

(4) a description of how the adequacy of the collection program will be monitored and maintained;

(5) the names and locations of collectors, transporters, and recyclers that will manage discarded paint;

(6) a description of how the discarded paint and the paint's components will be safely and securely transported, tracked, and handled from collection through final recycling and processing;

(7) a description of the method that will be used to reuse, deconstruct, or recycle the discarded paint to ensure that the paint's components, to the extent feasible, are transformed or remanufactured into finished products for use;

(8) a description of the promotion and outreach activities that will be used to encourage participation in the collection and recycling programs and how the activities' effectiveness will be evaluated and the program modified, if necessary;

(9) the proposed stewardship assessmentdeleted text begin . The producer or stewardship organization shall propose a uniform stewardship assessment for any architectural paint sold in the state. The proposed stewardship assessment shall be reviewed by an independent auditor to ensure that the assessment does not exceed the costs of the product stewardship program and the independent auditor shall recommend an amount for the stewardship assessment. The agency must approve the stewardship assessmentdeleted text end new text begin established according to subdivision 5anew text end ;

(10) evidence of adequate insurance and financial assurance that may be required for collection, handling, and disposal operations;

(11) five-year performance goals, including an estimate of the percentage of discarded paint that will be collected, reused, and recycled during each of the first five years of the stewardship plan. The performance goals must include a specific goal for the amount of discarded paint that will be collected and recycled and reused during each year of the plan. The performance goals must be based on:

(i) the most recent collection data available for the state;

(ii) the estimated amount of architectural paint disposed of annually;

(iii) the weight of the architectural paint that is expected to be available for collection annually; and

(iv) actual collection data from other existing stewardship programs.

The stewardship plan must state the methodology used to determine these goals; and

(12) a discussion of the status of end markets for collected architectural paint and what, if any, additional end markets are needed to improve the functioning of the program.

new text begin Subd. 5a. new text end

new text begin Stewardship assessment. new text end

new text begin (a) The producer or stewardship organization must propose a uniform stewardship assessment for any architectural paint sold in the state that covers but does not exceed the costs of developing the stewardship plan, operating and administering the program in accordance with the stewardship plan and the requirements of this section, and maintaining a financial reserve. new text end

new text begin (b) The producer or stewardship organization must retain an independent auditor to review the proposed stewardship assessment to ensure that the assessment meets the requirements of this section. The independent auditor must recommend an amount for the stewardship assessment. new text end

new text begin (c) A stewardship organization's or producer's product stewardship program must not maintain a financial reserve in excess of 75 percent of its annual operating expenses. new text end

new text begin (d) If the financial reserve exceeds 75 percent of the producer's or stewardship organization's annual operating expenses, the producer or stewardship organization must submit a proposed plan amendment according to subdivision 4, paragraph (c), to comply with this subdivision. new text end

new text begin (e) A producer or stewardship organization may submit a written request to the commissioner for an extension of the time to comply with paragraphs (c) and (d). The commissioner must review and approve or reject the request. If the commissioner approves a request, the commissioner must determine the length of the extension, which must not exceed two consecutive years. The request must demonstrate that the financial reserve is projected to fall below 75 percent of the producer's or stewardship organization's annual operating expenses without a plan amendment within two years of the request. new text end

new text begin (f) If the financial reserve falls below 60 percent of the producer's or stewardship organization's annual operating expenses, the producer or stewardship organization may submit a proposed plan amendment according to subdivision 4, paragraph (c), to comply with this subdivision. new text end

new text begin (g) The commissioner must review and approve or reject the stewardship assessment according to subdivision 7. new text end

new text begin (h) A producer or stewardship organization may not use any money collected through a stewardship assessment to pay for litigation against the state related to this section or to pay penalties imposed according to section 115.071 or 116.072. new text end

Subd. 6.

Consultation required.

Each stewardship organization or individual producer submitting a stewardship plan new text begin or plan amendment new text end must consult with stakeholders including retailers, contractors, collectors, recyclers, local government, and customers during the development of the plannew text begin or plan amendmentnew text end .

Subd. 7.

deleted text begin Agencydeleted text end new text begin Commissionernew text end review and approval.

(a) Within 90 days after deleted text begin receipt ofdeleted text end new text begin receivingnew text end a proposed stewardship plan, the deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end determine whether the plan complies with deleted text begin subdivision 4deleted text end new text begin this sectionnew text end . If the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end approves a plan, the deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end notify the applicant of the plan approval in writing. If the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end rejects a plan, the deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end notify the applicant in writing of the reasons for rejecting the plan.

new text begin (b)new text end An applicant whose plan is rejected by the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end must submit a revised new text begin stewardship new text end plan to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissioner new text end within 60 days after receiving notice of rejection.

deleted text begin (b)deleted text end new text begin (c)new text end Any proposed deleted text begin changesdeleted text end new text begin amendmentnew text end to a stewardship plan must be new text begin reviewed and new text end approved new text begin or rejected new text end by the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end in writingnew text begin according to this subdivisionnew text end .

Subd. 8.

Plan availability.

All deleted text begin draftdeleted text end new text begin proposed stewardship plans and amendmentsnew text end and approved stewardship plans deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin and amendments mustnew text end be placed on the agency's website for at least 30 days and made available at the agency's headquarters for public review and comment.

Subd. 9.

Conduct authorized.

A producer or stewardship organization that organizes collection, transport, and processing of architectural paint under this section is immune from liability for the conduct under state laws relating to antitrust, restraint of trade, unfair trade practices, and other regulation of trade or commerce only to the extent that the conduct is necessary to plan and implement the producer's or organization's chosen organized collection or recycling system.

Subd. 10.

Producer responsibilities.

(a) On and after the date of implementation of a product stewardship program according to this section, a producer of architectural paint must add the stewardship assessment, as established under subdivision deleted text begin 5, clause (9)deleted text end new text begin 5anew text end , to the cost of architectural paint sold to retailers and distributors in the state by the producer.

(b) Producers of architectural paint or the stewardship organization deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end provide consumers with educational materials regarding the stewardship assessment and product stewardship program. The materials must include, but are not limited to, information regarding available end-of-life management options for architectural paint offered through the product stewardship program and information that notifies consumers that a charge for the operation of the product stewardship program is included in the purchase price of architectural paint sold in the state.

Subd. 11.

Retailer responsibilities.

(a) deleted text begin On and after July 1, 2014, or three months after program plan approval, whichever is sooner,deleted text end No architectural paint may be sold in the state unless the paint's producer is participating in an approved stewardship plan.

(b) On and after the implementation date of a product stewardship program according to this section, each retailer or distributor, as applicable, must ensure that the full amount of the stewardship assessment added to the cost of architectural paint by producers under subdivision 10 is included in the purchase price of all architectural paint sold in the state.

(c) Any retailer may participate, on a voluntary basis, as a designated collection point pursuant to a product stewardship program under this section and in accordance with applicable law.

(d) No retailer or distributor shall be found to be in violation of this subdivision if, on the date the architectural paint was ordered from the producer or its agent, the producer was listed as compliant on the agency's website according to subdivision 14.

Subd. 12.

Stewardship reports.

deleted text begin Beginning October 1, 2015,deleted text end new text begin By April 1 each year,new text end producers of architectural paint sold in the state must individually or through a stewardship organization submit an annual report to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end describing the product stewardship programnew text begin for the preceding calendar yearnew text end . At a minimum, the report must contain:

(1) a description of the methods used to collect, transport, and process architectural paint in all regions of the state;

(2) the weight of all architectural paint collected in all regions of the state and a comparison to the performance goals and recycling rates established in the stewardship plan;

(3) the amount of unwanted architectural paint collected in the state by method of disposition, including reuse, recycling, and other methods of processing;

(4) samples of educational materials provided to consumers and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the materials and the methods used to disseminate the materials; and

(5) an independent financial audit.

Subd. 13.

Data classification.

Trade secret and sales information, as defined under section 13.37, submitted to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end under this section are private or nonpublic data under section 13.37.

Subd. 14.

deleted text begin Agencydeleted text end new text begin Commissionernew text end responsibilities.

The deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end provide, on deleted text begin itsdeleted text end new text begin the agency'snew text end website, a list of all compliant producers and brands participating in stewardship plans that the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end has approved and a list of all producers and brands the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end has identified as noncompliant with this section.

Subd. 15.

Local government responsibilities.

(a) A city, county, or other public agency may choose to participate voluntarily in a product stewardship program.

(b) Cities, counties, and other public agencies are encouraged to work with producers and stewardship organizations to assist in meeting product stewardship program reuse and recycling obligations, by providing education and outreach or using other strategies.

(c) A city, county, or other public agency that participates in a product stewardship program must report for the first year of the program to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end using the reporting form provided by the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end on the cost savings as a result of participation and new text begin must new text end describe how the savings were used.

Subd. 16.

Administrative fee.

(a) The stewardship organization or individual producer submitting a stewardship plan deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end pay an annual administrative fee to the commissioner. The deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end may establish a variable fee based on relevant factors, includingdeleted text begin ,deleted text end but not limited todeleted text begin ,deleted text end the portion of architectural paint sold in the state by members of the organization compared to the total amount of architectural paint sold in the state by all organizations submitting a stewardship plan.

(b) deleted text begin Prior to July 1, 2014, anddeleted text end Before July 1 deleted text begin annually thereafterdeleted text end new text begin each yearnew text end , the deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end identify the costs deleted text begin itdeleted text end new text begin the agencynew text end incurs under this section. The deleted text begin agency shalldeleted text end new text begin commissioner mustnew text end set the fee at an amount that, when paid by every stewardship organization or individual producer that submits a stewardship plan, is adequate to reimburse the agency's full costs of administering this section. The total amount of annual fees collected under this subdivision must not exceed the amount necessary to reimburse costs incurred by the agency to administer this section.

(c) A stewardship organization or individual producer subject to this subdivision must pay the deleted text begin agency'sdeleted text end new text begin commissioner'snew text end administrative fee under paragraph (a) on or before July 1deleted text begin , 2014, and annually thereafterdeleted text end new text begin each yearnew text end . Each year after the initial payment, the annual administrative fee may not exceed five percent of the aggregate stewardship assessment added to the cost of all architectural paint sold by producers in the state for the preceding calendar year.

(d) All fees received under this section deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be deposited in the state treasury and credited to a product stewardship account in the special revenue fund. deleted text begin For fiscal years 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017,deleted text end The amount collected under this section is annually appropriated to the deleted text begin agencydeleted text end new text begin commissionernew text end to implement and enforce this section.

new text begin Subd. 17. new text end

new text begin Duty to provide information. new text end

new text begin Upon request of the commissioner for purposes of determining compliance with this section, a person must furnish to the commissioner any information that the person has or may reasonably obtain. new text end

Sec. 9.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.49, is amended to read:

115A.49 deleted text begin SOLIDdeleted text end WASTE MANAGEMENT deleted text begin PROJECTSdeleted text end new text begin CAPITAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMnew text end .

new text begin (a) new text end There is established a program to encourage and assist cities, counties, solid waste management districts, and sanitary districts in the development and implementation of solid waste management projects and to transfer the knowledge and experience gained from such projects to other communities in the state.

new text begin (b) new text end The program must be administered to encourage local communities to develop feasible and prudent alternatives to disposal, includingnew text begin :new text end

new text begin (1) new text end waste reduction;

new text begin (2) reuse; new text end

new text begin (3) recycling; new text end

new text begin (4) composting source-separated compostable materials or yard waste; new text end

new text begin (5) resource recovery; new text end

new text begin (6) new text end waste separation by generators, collectors, and other persons; and

new text begin (7) new text end waste processing.

new text begin (c) new text end The commissioner shall administer the program deleted text begin in accordance with the requirements ofdeleted text end new text begin according tonew text end sections 115A.49 to 115A.54 and rules deleted text begin promulgateddeleted text end new text begin adoptednew text end under chapter 14. In administering the program, the commissioner shall give priority to projects in the order of preference of the waste management practices listed in section 115A.02. The commissioner shall give special consideration to areas where natural geologic and soil conditions are especially unsuitable for land disposal of solid waste; areas where the capacity of existing solid waste disposal facilities is determined by the commissioner to be less than five years; and projects serving more than one local government unit.

Sec. 10.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.51, is amended to read:

115A.51 APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS.

(a) Applications for assistance under the program must demonstrate:

(1) that the project is conceptually and technically feasible;

(2) that affected political subdivisions are committed to implement the project, to provide necessary local financing, and to accept and exercise the government powers necessary to the project;

(3) that operating revenues from the project, considering the availability and security of sources of solid waste and of markets for recovered resourcesnew text begin or the availability of materials for waste reduction or reusenew text end , together with any proposed federal, state, or local financial assistance, will be sufficient to pay all costs over the projected life of the project;

(4) that the applicant has evaluated the feasible and prudent alternatives to disposal, including using existing solid waste management facilities new text begin and facilities conducting waste reduction or reuse new text end with reasonably available capacity sufficient to accomplish the goals of the proposed project, and has compared and evaluated the costs of the alternatives, including capital and operating costs, and the effects of the alternatives on the cost to generators;

(5) that the applicant has identified:

(i) waste management objectives in applicable county and regional solid waste management plans consistent with section 115A.46, subdivision 2, paragraphs (e) and (f), or 473.149, subdivision 1; and

(ii) other solid waste new text begin management new text end facilities new text begin and facilities conducting waste reduction or reuse new text end identified in the county and regional plans; deleted text begin anddeleted text end

(6) that the applicant has conducted a comparative analysis of the project against existing public and private solid waste new text begin management new text end facilitiesnew text begin and facilities conducting waste reduction or reusenew text end , including an analysis of potential displacement of those facilities, to determine whether the project is the most appropriate alternative to achieve the identified waste management objectives that considers:

(i) conformity with approved county or regional solid waste management plans;

(ii) consistency with the state's solid waste hierarchy and section 115A.46, subdivision 2, paragraphs (e) and (f), or 473.149, subdivision 1; and

(iii) environmental standards related to public health, air, surface water, and groundwaterdeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

new text begin (7) that the applicant has evaluated the project's environmental impact on climate change, including greenhouse gas emissions; and new text end

new text begin (8) that the applicant has reviewed the project's impact on environmental justice areas, conducted stakeholder engagement, and assessed community input. new text end

(b) The commissioner deleted text begin maydeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end require completion of a comprehensive solid waste management plan conforming to the requirements of section 115A.46, before accepting an application. Within five days of filing an application with the agency, the applicant must submit a copy of the application to each solid waste management facilitynew text begin , including each facility used for waste reduction or reuse,new text end mentioned in the portion of the application addressing the requirements of paragraph (a), clauses (5) and (6).

Sec. 11.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.54, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Purposes; public interest; declaration of policy.

The legislature finds that deleted text begin the establishment of waste processingdeleted text end new text begin acquiring, establishing, and improvingnew text end facilities new text begin that conduct waste reduction, reuse, recycling, composting source-separated compostable materials or yard waste, resource recovery, and waste processing new text end and transfer stations serving such facilities is needed to new text begin reduce and new text end manage properly the solid waste generated in the state and to conserve and protect the natural resources in the state and the health, safety, and welfare of its citizens; that opportunities to new text begin acquire, new text end establishnew text begin , and improvenew text end the facilities and transfer stations are not being fully realized by individual political subdivisions or by agreements among subdivisions; and that therefore it is necessary to provide capital assistance to stimulate and encourage the acquisitionnew text begin , establishment,new text end and deleted text begin bettermentdeleted text end new text begin improvementnew text end of the facilities and transfer stations.

Sec. 12.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.54, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Administration; assurance of funds.

The commissioner shall provide technical and financial assistance deleted text begin for the acquisition and betterment ofdeleted text end new text begin to acquire, establish, and improvenew text end the facilities and transfer stations from revenues derived from deleted text begin the issuance ofdeleted text end new text begin issuingnew text end bonds authorized by section 115A.58. Facilities for deleted text begin the incineration ofdeleted text end new text begin incineratingnew text end solid waste without resource recovery are not eligible for assistance. Money appropriated for the purposes of the deleted text begin demonstrationdeleted text end program may be distributed as grants or loans. An individual project may receive assistance totaling up to 100 percent of the capital cost of the project and grants up to deleted text begin 50deleted text end new text begin 75new text end percent of the capital cost of the project. No grant or loan shall be disbursed to any recipient until the commissioner has determined the total estimated capital cost of the project and ascertained that financing of the cost is assured by funds provided by the state, by an agency of the federal government within the amount of funds then appropriated to that agency and allocated by it to projects within the state, by any person, or by the appropriation of proceeds of bonds or other funds of the recipient to a fund for deleted text begin the construction ofdeleted text end new text begin constructingnew text end the project.

Sec. 13.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.54, subdivision 2a, as amended by Laws 2023, chapter 25, section 34, is amended to read:

Subd. 2a.

Solid waste management projects.

(a) The commissioner shall provide technical and financial assistance deleted text begin for the acquisition and betterment ofdeleted text end new text begin to acquire, establish, and improvenew text end solid waste management projects as provided in this subdivision and section 115A.52. Money appropriated for the purposes of this subdivision must be distributed as grants.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) or (d), a project may receive grant assistance up to 25 percent of the capital cost of the project or deleted text begin $2,000,000deleted text end new text begin $5,000,000new text end , whichever is less, except that projects constructed as a result of intercounty cooperative agreements may receive new text begin the lesser of:new text end

(1) grant assistance up to 25 percent of the capital cost of the project; or

(2) deleted text begin $2,000,000deleted text end new text begin $5,000,000new text end times the number of participating countiesdeleted text begin , whichever is lessdeleted text end .

(c) A recycling project deleted text begin ordeleted text end new text begin ,new text end a project to compost deleted text begin or cocompostdeleted text end new text begin source-separated compostable material or yardnew text end wastenew text begin , or a project to manage household hazardous wastenew text end may receive grant assistance up to 50 percent of the capital cost of the project or deleted text begin $2,000,000deleted text end new text begin $5,000,000new text end , whichever is less, except that projects completed as a result of intercounty cooperative agreements may receive new text begin the lesser of: new text end

(1) grant assistance up to 50 percent of the capital cost of the project; or

(2) deleted text begin $2,000,000deleted text end new text begin $5,000,000 new text end times the number of participating countiesdeleted text begin , whichever is lessdeleted text end .

(d) The following projects may also receive grant assistance in the amounts specified in paragraph (c):

(1) a project to improve control of or reduce air emissions at an existing resource recovery facility; and

(2) a project to substantially increase the recovery of materials or energy, substantially reduce the amount or toxicity of waste processing residuals, or expand the capacity of an existing resource recovery facility to meet the resource recovery needs of an expanded region if each county from which waste is or would be received has achieved a recycling rate in excess of the goals in section 115A.551, and is implementing aggressive waste reduction and household hazardous waste management programs.

new text begin (e) A waste reduction project or reuse project may receive grant assistance up to 75 percent of the capital cost of the project or $5,000,000, whichever is less, except that projects completed as a result of intercounty cooperative agreements may receive the lesser of: new text end

new text begin (1) grant assistance up to 75 percent of the capital cost of the project; or new text end

new text begin (2) $5,000,000 times the number of participating counties. new text end

deleted text begin (e)deleted text end new text begin (f)new text end Notwithstanding paragraph deleted text begin (f)deleted text end new text begin (g)new text end , the commissioner may award grants for transfer stations that will initially transfer waste to landfills if the transfer stations are part of a planned resource recovery project, the county where the planned resource recovery facility will be located has a comprehensive solid waste management plan approved by the commissioner, and the solid waste management plan proposes the development of the resource recovery facility. If the proposed resource recovery facility is not in place and operating within 16 years of the date of the grant award, the recipient shall repay the grant amount to the state.

deleted text begin (f)deleted text end new text begin (g)new text end Projects without new text begin waste reduction, reuse, recycling, composting source-separated compostable material or yard waste, or new text end resource recovery are not eligible for assistance.new text begin Solid waste disposal facilities and equipment are not eligible for assistance.new text end

deleted text begin (g)deleted text end new text begin (h)new text end In addition to any assistance received under paragraph (b), (c), deleted text begin ordeleted text end (d), new text begin or (e), new text end a project may receive grant assistance for the cost of tests necessary to determine the appropriate pollution control equipment for the project or the environmental effects of the use of any product or material produced by the project.

deleted text begin (h)deleted text end new text begin (i)new text end In addition to the application requirements of section 115A.51, an application for a project serving eligible jurisdictions in only a single county must demonstrate that cooperation with jurisdictions in other counties to develop the project is not needed or not feasible. Each application must also demonstrate that the project is not financially prudent without the state assistance, because of the applicant's financial capacity and the problems inherent in the waste management situation in the area, particularly transportation distances and limited waste supply and markets for resources recovered.

deleted text begin (i)deleted text end new text begin (j)new text end For the purposes of this subdivision, deleted text begin adeleted text end "project" means new text begin acquisition, establishment, or improvement of new text end a deleted text begin processingdeleted text end facilitydeleted text begin ,deleted text end new text begin that conducts waste reduction, reuse, recycling, composting source-separated compostable materials or yard waste, resource recovery, or waste processing, new text end together with any transfer stations, transmission facilities, and other related and appurtenant facilities primarily serving the deleted text begin processingdeleted text end facility.

new text begin (k) new text end The commissioner shall adopt rules for the program deleted text begin by July 1, 1985deleted text end .

deleted text begin (j)deleted text end new text begin (l)new text end Notwithstanding anything in this subdivision to the contrary, a project to construct a new deleted text begin mixed municipaldeleted text end solid waste transfer station that has an enforceable commitment of at least ten years, or of sufficient length to retire bonds sold for the facility, to serve an existing resource recovery facility may receive grant assistance up to 75 percent of the capital cost of the project if addition of the transfer station will increase substantially the geographical area served by the resource recovery facility and the ability of the resource recovery facility to operate more efficiently on a regional basis and the facility meets the criteria in paragraph (d), clause (2). A transfer station eligible for assistance under this paragraph is not eligible for assistance under any other paragraph of this subdivision.

Sec. 14.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.565, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Grant program established.

The commissioner must make competitive grants to political subdivisions or federally recognized Tribes deleted text begin to establish curbside recycling or composting, increasedeleted text end new text begin for waste reduction, reuse,new text end recycling deleted text begin ordeleted text end new text begin , andnew text end compostingdeleted text begin , reduce the amount of recyclable materials entering disposal facilities, or reduce the costs associated with hauling waste by locating collection sites as close as possible to the site where the waste is generateddeleted text end new text begin of source-separated compostable materials or yard wastenew text end . To be eligible for grants under this section, a political subdivision or federally recognized Tribe must be located outside the seven-county metropolitan area and a city must have a population of less than 45,000.

Sec. 15.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115A.565, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Priorities; eligible projects.

(a) If applications for grants exceed the available appropriations, grants must be made for projects that, in the commissioner's judgment, provide the highest return in public benefits.

(b) To be eligible to receive a grant, a project must:

(1) be locally administered;

(2) have an educational component and measurable outcomes;

(3) request $250,000 or less;

(4) demonstrate local direct and indirect matching support of at least a quarter amount of the grant request; deleted text begin anddeleted text end

(5) include at least one of the following elements:

deleted text begin (i) transition to residential recycling through curbside or centrally located collection sites; deleted text end

deleted text begin (ii) development of local recycling systems to support curbside recycling; or deleted text end

deleted text begin (iii) development or expansion of local recycling systems to support recycling bulk materials, including, but not limited to, electronic waste. deleted text end

new text begin (i) waste reduction; new text end

new text begin (ii) reuse; new text end

new text begin (iii) recycling; or new text end

new text begin (iv) composting of source-separated compostable materials or yard waste; and new text end

new text begin (6) demonstrate that the project will reduce waste generation through waste reduction or reuse or that the project will increase the amount of recyclable materials or source-separated compostable materials diverted from a disposal facility. new text end

Sec. 16.

new text begin [115A.993] PROHIBITED DISPOSAL METHODS. new text end

new text begin A person must not dispose of waste treated seed in a manner inconsistent with the product label, where applicable, or by: new text end

new text begin (1) burial near a drinking water source or any creek, stream, river, lake, or other surface water; new text end

new text begin (2) composting; or new text end

new text begin (3) incinerating within a home or other dwelling. new text end

Sec. 17.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115B.17, subdivision 14, is amended to read:

Subd. 14.

Requests for review, investigation, and oversight.

(a) The commissioner may, upon request, assist a person in determining whether real property has been the site of a release or threatened release of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. The commissioner may also assist in, or supervise, the development and implementation of reasonable and necessary response actions. Assistance may include review of agency records and files, and review and approval of a requester's investigation plans and reports and response action plans and implementation.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph, the person requesting assistance under this subdivision shall pay the agency for the agency's cost, as determined by the commissioner, of providing assistance. A state agency, political subdivision, or other public entity is not required to pay for the agency's cost to review agency records and files. deleted text begin Money received by the agency for assistance under this sectiondeleted text end new text begin The first $350,000 received annually by the agency for assistance under this subdivision from persons who are not otherwise responsible under sections 115B.01 to 115B.18new text end must be deposited in the remediation fund and is exempt from section 16A.1285.new text begin Money received after the first $350,000 must be deposited in the state treasury and credited to an account in the special revenue fund. Money in the account is annually appropriated to the commissioner for the purposes of administering this subdivision.new text end

(c) When a person investigates a release or threatened release in accordance with an investigation plan approved by the commissioner under this subdivision, the investigation does not associate that person with the release or threatened release for the purpose of section 115B.03, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clause (4).

Sec. 18.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115B.171, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Test reporting.

(a) By deleted text begin Januarydeleted text end new text begin Marchnew text end 15 each year, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must report to each community in the east metropolitan area a summary of the results of the testing for private wells in the community. The report must include information on the number of wells tested and trends of PFC contamination in private wells in the community. Reports to communities under this section must also be published on the Pollution Control Agency's website.

(b) By deleted text begin Januarydeleted text end new text begin Marchnew text end 15 each year, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must report to the legislature, as provided in section 3.195, on the testing for private wells conducted in the east metropolitan area, including copies of the community reports required in paragraph (a), the number of requests for well testing in each community, and the total amount spent for testing private wells in each community.

Sec. 19.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 115B.52, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4.

Reporting.

The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency and the commissioner of natural resources must jointly submit:

(1) by April 1, 2019, an implementation plan detailing how the commissioners will:

(i) determine how the priorities in the settlement will be met and how the spending will move from the first priority to the second priority and the second priority to the third priority outlined in the settlement; and

(ii) evaluate and determine what projects receive funding;

(2) by deleted text begin February 1 and August 1deleted text end new text begin October 1 new text end each year, a deleted text begin biannualdeleted text end report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative policy and finance committees with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources on expenditures from the water quality and sustainability account during the previous deleted text begin six monthsdeleted text end new text begin fiscal yearnew text end ; and

(3) by deleted text begin Augustdeleted text end new text begin Octobernew text end 1, deleted text begin 2019deleted text end new text begin 2023new text end , and each year thereafter, a report to the legislature on expenditures from the water quality and sustainability account during the previous fiscal year and a spending plan for anticipated expenditures from the account during the current fiscal year.

Sec. 20.

new text begin [116.064] ODOR MANAGEMENT. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Definitions. new text end

new text begin (a) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given. new text end

new text begin (b) "Objectionable odor" means pollution of the ambient air beyond the property line of a facility consisting of an odor that, considering its characteristics, intensity, frequency, and duration: new text end

new text begin (1) is, or can reasonably be expected to be, injurious to public health or welfare; or new text end

new text begin (2) unreasonably interferes with the enjoyment of life or the use of property of persons exposed to the odor. new text end

new text begin (c) "Odor complaint" means a notification received and recorded by the agency or by a political subdivision from an identifiable person that describes the nature, duration, and location of the odor. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Application. new text end

new text begin This section applies to facilities that are located in the counties of Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott, or Washington. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Prohibition. new text end

new text begin No person may cause or allow emission into the ambient air of any substance or combination of substances in quantities that produce an objectionable odor beyond the property line of the facility that is the source of the odor. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Odor complaints; investigation. new text end

new text begin (a) The agency must conduct a site investigation of any facility against which ten or more verifiable odor complaints have been submitted to the agency or to local government officials within 48 hours. The investigation must include: new text end

new text begin (1) an interview with the owner or operator of the facility against which the complaint was made; new text end

new text begin (2) a physical examination of the facilities, equipment, operations, conditions, methods, storage areas for material inputs, chemicals and waste, and any other factors that may contribute to or are designed to mitigate the emission of odors; and new text end

new text begin (3) testing at locations identified in the odor complaints and at other locations beyond the property line of the facility that is the source of the odor using a precision instrument capable of measuring odors in ambient air. new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner, based upon the agency's site investigation and the results of odor testing and considering the nature, intensity, frequency, and duration of the odor and other relevant factors, shall determine whether the odor emitted from the facility constitutes an objectionable odor. In making the determination, the commissioner may consider the opinions of a random sample of persons exposed to samples of the odor taken from ambient air beyond the property line of the facility that is the source of the odor. new text end

new text begin (c) The agency must notify officials in local jurisdictions: new text end

new text begin (1) of odor complaints filed with the agency regarding properties within the local jurisdiction; new text end

new text begin (2) of any investigation of an odor complaint conducted by the agency at a facility within the local jurisdiction and the results of the investigation; new text end

new text begin (3) that odor complaints filed with respect to properties located within those jurisdictions must be forwarded to the agency within three business days of being filed; and new text end

new text begin (4) of any additional actions taken by the agency with respect to the complaints. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Objectionable odor; management plan. new text end

new text begin (a) If the commissioner determines under subdivision 4 that the odor emitted from a facility is an objectionable odor, the commissioner shall require the owner of the facility to develop and submit to the agency for review within 90 days an odor management plan designed to mitigate odor emissions. The agency must provide technical assistance to the property owner in developing a management plan, including: new text end

new text begin (1) identifying odor control technology and equipment that may reduce odor emissions; and new text end

new text begin (2) identifying alternative methods of operation or alternative materials that may reduce odor emissions. new text end

new text begin The commissioner may grant an extension for submission of the odor management plan for up to an additional 90 days for good cause. new text end

new text begin (b) An odor management plan must contain, at a minimum, for each odor source contributing to odor emissions: new text end

new text begin (1) a description of plant operations and materials that generate odors; new text end

new text begin (2) proposed changes in equipment, operations, or materials that are designed to mitigate odor emissions; new text end

new text begin (3) the estimated effectiveness of the plan in reducing odor emissions; new text end

new text begin (4) the estimated cost of implementing the plan; and new text end

new text begin (5) a schedule of plan implementation activities. new text end

new text begin (c) The commissioner may accept, reject, or modify an odor management plan submitted under this subdivision. new text end

new text begin (d) If the commissioner, based upon the same factors considered under subdivision 4, paragraph (b), determines that implementation of the odor management plan has failed to reduce the facility's odor emissions to a level where they are no longer objectionable odors, the commissioner shall order the facility owner to revise the odor management plan within 90 days of receipt of the commissioner's order. If the revised odor management plan is not acceptable to the commissioner or is implemented but fails to reduce the property's odor emissions to a level where they are no longer objectionable odors, the commissioner may impose penalties under section 115.071 or may modify or revoke the facility's permit under section 116.07, subdivision 4a, paragraph (d). new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Exemptions. new text end

new text begin This section does not apply to: new text end

new text begin (1) on-farm animal and agricultural operations; new text end

new text begin (2) motor vehicles and transportation facilities; new text end

new text begin (3) municipal wastewater treatment plants; new text end

new text begin (4) single-family dwellings not used for commercial purposes; new text end

new text begin (5) materials odorized for safety purposes; new text end

new text begin (6) painting and coating operations that are not required to be licensed; new text end

new text begin (7) restaurants; new text end

new text begin (8) temporary activities and operations; new text end

new text begin (9) refineries; and new text end

new text begin (10) Metropolitan Council wastewater systems. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Rulemaking required. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner must adopt rules to implement this section, and section 14.125 does not apply. new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner must comply with chapter 14 and must complete the statement of need and reasonableness according to chapter 14 and section 116.07, subdivision 2, paragraph (f). new text end

new text begin (c) The rules must include: new text end

new text begin (1) an odor standard or standards for air pollution that may qualify as an objectionable odor under subdivision 1, paragraph (b), clause (2); new text end

new text begin (2) a process for determining if an odor is objectionable; new text end

new text begin (3) a process for investigating and addressing odor complaints; new text end

new text begin (4) guidance for developing odor-management plans; and new text end

new text begin (5) procedures and criteria for determining the success or failure of an odor-management plan. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective the day following final enactment. new text end

Sec. 21.

new text begin [116.943] PRODUCTS CONTAINING PFAS. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Definitions. new text end

new text begin (a) For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given. new text end

new text begin (b) "Adult mattress" means a mattress other than a crib mattress or toddler mattress. new text end

new text begin (c) "Air care product" means a chemically formulated consumer product labeled to indicate that the purpose of the product is to enhance or condition the indoor environment by eliminating odors or freshening the air. new text end

new text begin (d) "Automotive maintenance product" means a chemically formulated consumer product labeled to indicate that the purpose of the product is to maintain the appearance of a motor vehicle, including products for washing, waxing, polishing, cleaning, or treating the exterior or interior surfaces of motor vehicles. Automotive maintenance product does not include automotive paint or paint repair products. new text end

new text begin (e) "Carpet or rug" means a fabric marketed or intended for use as a floor covering. new text end

new text begin (f) "Cleaning product" means a finished product used primarily for domestic, commercial, or institutional cleaning purposes, including but not limited to an air care product, an automotive maintenance product, a general cleaning product, or a polish or floor maintenance product. new text end

new text begin (g) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency. new text end

new text begin (h) "Cookware" means durable houseware items used to prepare, dispense, or store food, foodstuffs, or beverages. Cookware includes but is not limited to pots, pans, skillets, grills, baking sheets, baking molds, trays, bowls, and cooking utensils. new text end

new text begin (i) "Cosmetic" means articles, excluding soap: new text end

new text begin (1) intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body or any part thereof for the purpose of cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance; and new text end

new text begin (2) intended for use as a component of any such article. new text end

new text begin (j) "Currently unavoidable use" means a use of PFAS that the commissioner has determined by rule under this section to be essential for health, safety, or the functioning of society and for which alternatives are not reasonably available. new text end

new text begin (k) "Fabric treatment" means a substance applied to fabric to give the fabric one or more characteristics, including but not limited to stain resistance or water resistance. new text end

new text begin (l) "Intentionally added" means PFAS deliberately added during the manufacture of a product where the continued presence of PFAS is desired in the final product or one of the product's components to perform a specific function. new text end

new text begin (m) "Juvenile product" means a product designed or marketed for use by infants and children under 12 years of age: new text end

new text begin (1) including but not limited to a baby or toddler foam pillow; bassinet; bedside sleeper; booster seat; changing pad; child restraint system for use in motor vehicles and aircraft; co-sleeper; crib mattress; highchair; highchair pad; infant bouncer; infant carrier; infant seat; infant sleep positioner; infant swing; infant travel bed; infant walker; nap cot; nursing pad; nursing pillow; play mat; playpen; play yard; polyurethane foam mat, pad, or pillow; portable foam nap mat; portable infant sleeper; portable hook-on chair; soft-sided portable crib; stroller; and toddler mattress; and new text end

new text begin (2) not including a children's electronic product such as a personal computer, audio and video equipment, calculator, wireless phone, game console, handheld device incorporating a video screen, or any associated peripheral such as a mouse, keyboard, power supply unit, or power cord; or an adult mattress. new text end

new text begin (n) "Manufacturer" means the person that creates or produces a product or whose brand name is affixed to the product. In the case of a product imported into the United States, manufacturer includes the importer or first domestic distributor of the product if the person that manufactured or assembled the product or whose brand name is affixed to the product does not have a presence in the United States. new text end

new text begin (o) "Medical device" has the meaning given "device" under United States Code, title 21, section 321, subsection (h). new text end

new text begin (p) "Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances" or "PFAS" means a class of fluorinated organic chemicals containing at least one fully fluorinated carbon atom. new text end

new text begin (q) "Product" means an item manufactured, assembled, packaged, or otherwise prepared for sale to consumers, including but not limited to its product components, sold or distributed for personal, residential, commercial, or industrial use, including for use in making other products. new text end

new text begin (r) "Product component" means an identifiable component of a product, regardless of whether the manufacturer of the product is the manufacturer of the component. new text end

new text begin (s) "Ski wax" means a lubricant applied to the bottom of snow runners, including but not limited to skis and snowboards, to improve their grip or glide properties. Ski wax includes related tuning products. new text end

new text begin (t) "Textile" means an item made in whole or part from a natural or synthetic fiber, yarn, or fabric. Textile includes but is not limited to leather, cotton, silk, jute, hemp, wool, viscose, nylon, and polyester. new text end

new text begin (u) "Textile furnishings" means textile goods of a type customarily used in households and businesses, including but not limited to draperies, floor coverings, furnishings, bedding, towels, and tablecloths. new text end

new text begin (v) "Upholstered furniture" means an article of furniture that is designed to be used for sitting, resting, or reclining and that is wholly or partly stuffed or filled with any filling material. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Information required. new text end

new text begin (a) On or before January 1, 2026, a manufacturer of a product sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state that contains intentionally added PFAS must submit to the commissioner information that includes: new text end

new text begin (1) a brief description of the product, including a universal product code (UPC), stock keeping unit (SKU), or other numeric code assigned to the product; new text end

new text begin (2) the purpose for which PFAS are used in the product, including in any product components; new text end

new text begin (3) the amount of each PFAS, identified by its chemical abstracts service registry number, in the product, reported as an exact quantity determined using commercially available analytical methods or as falling within a range approved for reporting purposes by the commissioner; new text end

new text begin (4) the name and address of the manufacturer and the name, address, and phone number of a contact person for the manufacturer; and new text end

new text begin (5) any additional information requested by the commissioner as necessary to implement the requirements of this section. new text end

new text begin (b) With the approval of the commissioner, a manufacturer may supply the information required in paragraph (a) for a category or type of product rather than for each individual product. new text end

new text begin (c) A manufacturer must submit the information required under this subdivision whenever a new product that contains intentionally added PFAS is sold, offered for sale, or distributed in the state and update and revise the information whenever there is significant change in the information or when requested to do so by the commissioner. new text end

new text begin (d) A person may not sell, offer for sale, or distribute for sale in the state a product containing intentionally added PFAS if the manufacturer has failed to provide the information required under this subdivision and the person has received notification under subdivision 4. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Information requirement waivers; extensions. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner may waive all or part of the information requirement under subdivision 2 if the commissioner determines that substantially equivalent information is already publicly available. The commissioner may grant a waiver under this paragraph to a manufacturer or a group of manufacturers for multiple products or a product category. new text end

new text begin (b) For a pesticide regulated under chapter 18B, a fertilizer, an agricultural liming material, a plant amendment, or a soil amendment regulated under chapter 18C, a manufacturer may satisfy the requirements of subdivision 2 by submitting the information required by that subdivision as part of its annual registration or approval process under chapter 18B or 18C. For information that is regulated under chapters 18B and 18C, the commissioner and the commissioner of agriculture must jointly determine whether to make the information publicly available based on applicable statutes. new text end

new text begin (c) The commissioner may enter into an agreement with one or more other states or political subdivisions of a state to collect information and may accept information to a shared system as meeting the information requirement under subdivision 2. new text end

new text begin (d) The commissioner may extend the deadline for submission by a manufacturer of the information required under subdivision 2 if the commissioner determines that more time is needed by the manufacturer to comply with the submission requirement. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Testing required and certificate of compliance. new text end

new text begin (a) If the commissioner has reason to believe that a product contains intentionally added PFAS and the product is being offered for sale in the state, the commissioner may direct the manufacturer of the product to, within 30 days, provide the commissioner with testing results that demonstrate the amount of each of the PFAS, identified by its chemical abstracts service registry number, in the product, reported as an exact quantity determined using commercially available analytical methods or as falling within a range approved for reporting purposes by the commissioner. new text end

new text begin (b) If testing demonstrates that the product does not contain intentionally added PFAS, the manufacturer must provide the commissioner a certificate attesting that the product does not contain intentionally added PFAS, including testing results and any other relevant information. new text end

new text begin (c) If testing demonstrates that the product contains intentionally added PFAS, the manufacturer must provide the commissioner with the testing results and the information required under subdivision 2. new text end

new text begin (d) A manufacturer must notify persons who sell or offer for sale a product prohibited under subdivision 2 or 5 that the sale of that product is prohibited in this state and provide the commissioner with a list of the names and addresses of those notified. new text end

new text begin (e) The commissioner may notify persons who sell or offer for sale a product prohibited under subdivision 2 or 5 that the sale of that product is prohibited in this state. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Prohibitions. new text end

new text begin (a) Beginning January 1, 2025, a person may not sell, offer for sale, or distribute for sale in this state the following products if the product contains intentionally added PFAS: new text end

new text begin (1) carpets or rugs; new text end

new text begin (2) cleaning products; new text end

new text begin (3) cookware; new text end

new text begin (4) cosmetics; new text end

new text begin (5) dental floss; new text end

new text begin (6) fabric treatments; new text end

new text begin (7) juvenile products; new text end

new text begin (8) menstruation products; new text end

new text begin (9) textile furnishings; new text end

new text begin (10) ski wax; or new text end

new text begin (11) upholstered furniture. new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner may by rule identify additional products by category or use that may not be sold, offered for sale, or distributed for sale in this state if they contain intentionally added PFAS and designate effective dates. A prohibition adopted under this paragraph must be effective no earlier than January 1, 2025, and no later than January 1, 2032. The commissioner must prioritize the prohibition of the sale of product categories that, in the commissioner's judgment, are most likely to contaminate or harm the state's environment and natural resources if they contain intentionally added PFAS. new text end

new text begin (c) Beginning January 1, 2032, a person may not sell, offer for sale, or distribute for sale in this state any product that contains intentionally added PFAS, unless the commissioner has determined by rule that the use of PFAS in the product is a currently unavoidable use. The commissioner may specify specific products or product categories for which the commissioner has determined the use of PFAS is a currently unavoidable use. The commissioner may not determine that the use of PFAS in a product is a currently unavoidable use if the product is listed in paragraph (a). new text end

new text begin (d) The commissioner may not take action under paragraph (b) or (c) with respect to a pesticide, as defined under chapter 18B, a fertilizer, an agricultural liming material, a plant amendment, or a soil amendment as defined under chapter 18C, unless the commissioner of agriculture approves the action. new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Fees. new text end

new text begin The commissioner may establish by rule a fee payable by a manufacturer to the commissioner upon submission of the information required under subdivision 2 to cover the agency's reasonable costs to implement this section. Fees collected under this subdivision must be deposited in an account in the environmental fund. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Enforcement. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner may enforce this section under sections 115.071 and 116.072. The commissioner may coordinate with the commissioners of agriculture, commerce, and health in enforcing this section. new text end

new text begin (b) When requested by the commissioner, a person must furnish to the commissioner any information that the person may have or may reasonably obtain that is relevant to show compliance with this section. new text end

new text begin Subd. 8. new text end

new text begin Exemptions. new text end

new text begin (a) This section does not apply to: new text end

new text begin (1) a product for which federal law governs the presence of PFAS in the product in a manner that preempts state authority; new text end

new text begin (2) a product regulated under section 325F.072 or 325F.075; or new text end

new text begin (3) the sale or resale of a used product. new text end

new text begin (b) Subdivisions 4 and 5 do not apply to a prosthetic or orthotic device or to any product that is a medical device or drug or that is otherwise used in a medical setting or in medical applications regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration. new text end

new text begin Subd. 9. new text end

new text begin Rules. new text end

new text begin The commissioner may adopt rules necessary to implement this section. Section 14.125 does not apply to the commissioner's rulemaking authority under this section. new text end

new text begin Subd. 10. new text end

new text begin Short title. new text end

new text begin This section is "Amara's Law." new text end

Sec. 22.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116C.03, subdivision 2a, is amended to read:

Subd. 2a.

Public members.

The membership terms, compensation, removal, and filling of vacancies of public members of the board shall be as provided in section 15.0575new text begin , except that a public member may be compensated at the rate of up to $125 a daynew text end .

Sec. 23.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 325E.046, is amended to read:

325E.046 STANDARDS FOR LABELING deleted text begin PLASTICdeleted text end BAGSnew text begin , FOOD OR BEVERAGE PRODUCTS, AND PACKAGINGnew text end .

Subdivision 1.

deleted text begin "deleted text end Biodegradabledeleted text begin "deleted text end label.

A manufacturer, distributor, or wholesaler new text begin may not sell or offer for sale and any other personnew text end may not new text begin knowingly sell or new text end offer for sale in this state a deleted text begin plastic bagdeleted text end new text begin covered productnew text end labeled "biodegradable," "degradable," new text begin "decomposable," new text end or any form of those terms, or in any way imply that the deleted text begin bagdeleted text end new text begin covered productnew text end will deleted text begin chemically decompose into innocuous elements in a reasonably short period of time in a landfill, composting, or other terrestrial environment unless a scientifically based standard for biodegradability is developed and the bags are certified as meeting the standard.deleted text end new text begin break down, fragment, degrade, biodegrade, or decompose in a landfill or other environment, unless an ASTM standard specification is adopted for the term claimed and the product is certified as meeting the specification in compliance with the provisions of subdivision 2a. new text end

Subd. 2.

deleted text begin "deleted text end Compostabledeleted text begin "deleted text end label.

new text begin (a) new text end A manufacturer, distributor, or wholesaler new text begin may not sell or offer for sale and any other personnew text end may not new text begin knowingly sell or new text end offer for sale in this state a deleted text begin plastic bagdeleted text end new text begin covered productnew text end labeled "compostable" unless, at the time of salenew text begin or offer for salenew text end , the deleted text begin bagdeleted text end new text begin covered product:new text end

new text begin (1)new text end meets the ASTM Standard Specification for deleted text begin Compostabledeleted text end new text begin Labeling ofnew text end Plastics new text begin Designed to be Aerobically Composted in Municipal or Industrial Facilities new text end (D6400)deleted text begin . Each bag must be labeled to reflect that it meets the standard. For purposes of this subdivision, "ASTM" has the meaning given in section 296A.01, subdivision 6.deleted text end new text begin or its successor or the ASTM Standard Specification for Labeling of End Items that Incorporate Plastics and Polymers as Coatings or Additives with Paper and Other Substrates Designed to be Aerobically Composted in Municipal or Industrial Facilities (D6868) or its successor, and the covered product is labeled to reflect that it meets the specification;new text end

new text begin (2) is comprised of only wood without any coatings or additives; or new text end

new text begin (3) is comprised of only paper without any coatings or additives. new text end

new text begin (b) A covered product labeled "compostable" and meeting the criteria under paragraph (a) must be clearly and prominently labeled on the product, or on the product's smallest unit of sale, to reflect that it is intended for an industrial or commercial compost facility. The label required under this paragraph must be in a legible text size and font. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2a. new text end

new text begin Certification of products. new text end

new text begin Beginning January 1, 2026, a manufacturer, distributor, or wholesaler may not sell or offer for sale and any other person may not knowingly sell or offer for sale in this state a covered product labeled as "biodegradable" or "compostable" unless the covered product is certified as meeting the requirements of subdivision 1 or 2, as applicable, by an entity that: new text end

new text begin (1) is a nonprofit corporation; new text end

new text begin (2) as its primary focus of operation, promotes the production, use, and appropriate end of life for materials and products that are designed to fully biodegrade in specific biologically active environments such as industrial composting; and new text end

new text begin (3) is technically capable of and willing to perform analysis necessary to determine a product's compliance with subdivision 1 or 2, as applicable. new text end

Subd. 3.

Enforcement; civil penalty; injunctive relief.

(a) A deleted text begin manufacturer, distributor, or wholesalerdeleted text end new text begin personnew text end who violates deleted text begin subdivision 1 or 2deleted text end new text begin this sectionnew text end is subject to a civil new text begin or administrative new text end penalty of $100 for each prepackaged saleable unit new text begin sold or new text end offered for sale up to a maximum of $5,000 and may be enjoined from those violations.

(b) The attorney general may bring an action in the name of the state in a court of competent jurisdiction for recovery of civil penalties or for injunctive relief as provided in this subdivision. The attorney general may accept an assurance of discontinuance of acts in violation of deleted text begin subdivision 1 or 2deleted text end new text begin this sectionnew text end in the manner provided in section 8.31, subdivision 2b.

new text begin (c) The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency may enforce this section under sections 115.071 and 116.072. The commissioner may coordinate with the commissioners of commerce and health in enforcing this section. new text end

new text begin (d) When requested by the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, a person selling or offering for sale a covered product labeled as "compostable" must furnish to the commissioner any information that the person may have or may reasonably obtain that is relevant to show compliance with this section. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Definitions. new text end

new text begin For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given: new text end

new text begin (1) "ASTM" has the meaning given in section 296A.01, subdivision 6; new text end

new text begin (2) "covered product" means a bag, food or beverage product, or packaging; new text end

new text begin (3) "food or beverage product" means a product that is used to wrap, package, contain, serve, store, prepare, or consume a food or beverage, such as plates, bowls, cups, lids, trays, straws, utensils, and hinged or lidded containers; and new text end

new text begin (4) "packaging" has the meaning given in section 115A.03, subdivision 22b. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 24.

new text begin [325E.3892] LEAD AND CADMIUM IN CONSUMER PRODUCTS; PROHIBITION. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Definitions. new text end

new text begin For purposes of this section, "covered product" means any of the following products or product components: new text end

new text begin (1) jewelry; new text end

new text begin (2) toys; new text end

new text begin (3) cosmetics and personal care products; new text end

new text begin (4) puzzles, board games, card games, and similar games; new text end

new text begin (5) play sets and play structures; new text end

new text begin (6) outdoor games; new text end

new text begin (7) school supplies; new text end

new text begin (8) pots and pans; new text end

new text begin (9) cups, bowls, and other food containers; new text end

new text begin (10) craft supplies and jewelry-making supplies; new text end

new text begin (11) chalk, crayons, paints, and other art supplies; new text end

new text begin (12) fidget spinners; new text end

new text begin (13) costumes, costume accessories, and children's and seasonal party supplies; new text end

new text begin (14) keys, key chains, and key rings; and new text end

new text begin (15) clothing, footwear, headwear, and accessories. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Prohibition. new text end

new text begin (a) A person must not import, manufacture, sell, hold for sale, or distribute or offer for use in this state any covered product containing: new text end

new text begin (1) lead at more than 0.009 percent by total weight (90 parts per million); or new text end

new text begin (2) cadmium at more than 0.0075 percent by total weight (75 parts per million). new text end

new text begin (b) This section does not apply to covered products containing lead or cadmium, or both, when regulation is preempted by federal law. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Enforcement. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioners of the Pollution Control Agency, commerce, and health may coordinate to enforce this section. The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency or commerce may, with the attorney general, enforce any federal restrictions on the sale of products containing lead or cadmium, or both, as allowed under federal law. The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency may enforce this section under sections 115.071 and 116.072. The commissioner of commerce may enforce this section under sections 45.027, subdivisions 1 to 6; 325F.10 to 325F.12; and 325F.14 to 325F.16. The attorney general may enforce this section under section 8.31. new text end

new text begin (b) When requested by the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, the commissioner of commerce, or the attorney general, a person must furnish to the commissioner or attorney general any information that the person may have or may reasonably obtain that is relevant to show compliance with this section. new text end

Sec. 25.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 325F.072, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Definitions.

(a) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

(b) "Class B firefighting foam" means foam designed deleted text begin for flammable liquid firesdeleted text end new text begin to prevent or extinguish a fire in flammable liquids, combustible liquids, petroleum greases, tars, oils, oil-based paints, solvents, lacquers, alcohols, and flammable gasesnew text end .

(c) "PFAS chemicals" or "perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances" meansdeleted text begin , for the purposes of firefighting agents,deleted text end a class of fluorinated organic chemicals containing at least one fully fluorinated carbon atom deleted text begin and designed to be fully functional in class B firefighting foam formulationsdeleted text end .

(d) "Political subdivision" means a county, city, town, or a metropolitan airports commission organized and existing under sections 473.601 to 473.679.

(e) "State agency" means an agency as defined in section 16B.01, subdivision 2.

(f) "Testing" means calibration testing, conformance testing, and fixed system testing.

Sec. 26.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 325F.072, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Prohibition deleted text begin of testing and trainingdeleted text end .

(a) deleted text begin Beginning July 1, 2020,deleted text end No person, political subdivision, or state agency shall deleted text begin discharge class B firefighting foam that contains intentionally addeddeleted text end new text begin manufacture or knowingly sell, offer for sale, distribute for sale, or distribute for use in this state, and no person shall use in this state, class B firefighting foam containingnew text end PFAS chemicalsdeleted text begin :deleted text end new text begin .new text end

deleted text begin (1) for testing purposes, unless the testing facility has implemented appropriate containment, treatment, and disposal measures to prevent releases of foam to the environment; or deleted text end

deleted text begin (2) for training purposes, unless otherwise required by law, and with the condition that the training event has implemented appropriate containment, treatment, and disposal measures to prevent releases of foam to the environment. For training purposes, class B foam that contains intentionally added PFAS chemicals shall not be used. deleted text end

deleted text begin (b) This section does not restrict: deleted text end

deleted text begin (1) the manufacture, sale, or distribution of class B firefighting foam that contains intentionally added PFAS chemicals; or deleted text end

deleted text begin (2) the discharge or other use of class B firefighting foams that contain intentionally added PFAS chemicals in emergency firefighting or fire prevention operations. deleted text end

new text begin (b) This subdivision does not apply to the manufacture, sale, distribution, or use of class B firefighting foam for which the inclusion of PFAS chemicals is required by federal law, including but not limited to Code of Federal Regulations, title 14, section 139.317. If a federal requirement to include PFAS chemicals in class B firefighting foam is revoked after January 1, 2024, class B firefighting foam subject to the revoked requirements is no longer exempt under this paragraph effective one year after the day of revocation. new text end

new text begin (c) This subdivision does not apply to the manufacture, sale, distribution, or use of class B firefighting foam for purposes of use at an airport, as defined under section 360.013, subdivision 39, until the state fire marshal makes a determination that: new text end

new text begin (1) the Federal Aviation Administration has provided policy guidance on the transition to fluorine-free firefighting foam; new text end

new text begin (2) a fluorine-free firefighting foam product is included in the Federal Aviation Administration's Qualified Product Database; and new text end

new text begin (3) a firefighting foam product included in the database under clause (2) is commercially available in quantities sufficient to reliably meet the requirements under Code of Federal Regulations, title 14, part 139. new text end

new text begin (d) Until the state fire marshal makes a determination under paragraph (c), the operator of an airport using class B firefighting foam containing PFAS chemicals must, on or before December 31 each calendar year, submit a report to the state fire marshal regarding the status of the airport's conversion to class B firefighting foam products without intentionally added PFAS, the disposal of class B firefighting foam products with intentionally added PFAS, and an assessment of the factors listed in paragraph (c) as applied to the airport. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2024. new text end

Sec. 27.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 325F.072, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 3a. new text end

new text begin Discharge for testing and training. new text end

new text begin A person, political subdivision, or state agency exempted from the prohibitions under subdivision 3 may not discharge class B firefighting foam that contains intentionally added PFAS chemicals for: new text end

new text begin (1) testing purposes, unless the testing facility has implemented appropriate containment, treatment, and disposal measures to prevent releases of foam to the environment; or new text end

new text begin (2) training purposes, unless otherwise required by law, and with the condition that the training event has implemented appropriate containment, treatment, and disposal measures to prevent releases of foam to the environment. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2024. new text end

Sec. 28.

new text begin TREATED SEED WASTE DISPOSAL RULEMAKING. new text end

new text begin The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, in consultation with the commissioner of agriculture and the University of Minnesota, must adopt rules under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14, providing for the safe and lawful disposal of waste treated seed. The rules must clearly identify the regulatory jurisdiction of state agencies and local governments with regard to such seed. Additional Department of Agriculture staff will not be hired until rulemaking is completed. new text end

Sec. 29.

new text begin PETROLEUM TANK RELEASE CLEANUP; REPORT. new text end

new text begin The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must perform the duties under clauses (1) to (5) with respect to the petroleum tank release cleanup program governed by Minnesota Statutes, chapter 115C, and must, no later than January 15, 2025, report the results to the chairs and ranking minority members of the senate and house of representatives committees with primary jurisdiction over environment policy and finance. The report must include any recommendations for legislation. The commissioner must: new text end

new text begin (1) explicitly define the conditions that must be present in order for the commissioner to classify a site as posing a low potential risk to public health and the environment and ensure that all agency staff use the definition in assessing potential risks. In determining the conditions that indicate that a site poses a low risk, the commissioner must consider relevant site conditions, including but not limited to the nature of groundwater flow, soil type, and proximity of features at or near the site that could potentially become contaminated; new text end

new text begin (2) develop guidelines to incorporate consideration of potential future uses of a contaminated property into all agency staff decisions regarding site remediation; new text end

new text begin (3) develop scientifically based and measurable technical standards that allow the quality of the agency's performance in remediating petroleum-contaminated properties to be evaluated and conduct such evaluations periodically; new text end

new text begin (4) in collaboration with the Petroleum Tank Release Compensation Board and the commissioner of commerce, examine whether and how to establish technical qualifications for consultants hired to remediate petroleum-contaminated properties as a strategy to improve the quality of remediation work and how agencies can share information on consultant performance; and new text end

new text begin (5) in collaboration with the commissioner of commerce, make consultants who remediate petroleum-contaminated sites more accountable for the quality of their work by: new text end

new text begin (i) requiring a thorough evaluation of the past performance of a contractor being considered for hire; new text end

new text begin (ii) developing a formal system of measures and procedures by which to evaluate the work; and new text end

new text begin (iii) sharing evaluations with the commissioner of commerce and with responsible parties. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective the day following final enactment. new text end

Sec. 30.

new text begin PFAS MANUFACTURERS FEE WORK GROUP. new text end

new text begin The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, in cooperation with the commissioners of revenue and management and budget, must establish a work group to review options for collecting a fee from manufacturers of PFAS in the state. By February 15, 2024, the commissioner must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources with recommendations. new text end

Sec. 31.

new text begin TEMPORARY EXEMPTION FOR TERMINALS AND OIL REFINERIES. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Temporary exemption. new text end

new text begin Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.072, subdivision 3, does not apply to the manufacture, sale, distribution, or use of class B firefighting foam for the purposes of use at a terminal or oil refinery until January 1, 2026. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Extension; waiver. new text end

new text begin (a) A person who operates a terminal or oil refinery may apply to the state fire marshal for a waiver to extend the exemption under subdivision 1 beyond January 1, 2026, as provided in this subdivision. new text end

new text begin (b) The state fire marshal may grant a waiver to extend the exemption under subdivision 1 for a specific use if the applicant provides all of the following: new text end

new text begin (1) clear and convincing evidence that there is no commercially available replacement that does not contain intentionally added PFAS chemicals and that is capable of suppressing fire for that specific use; new text end

new text begin (2) information on the amount of firefighting foam containing intentionally added PFAS chemicals stored, used, or released on-site on an annual basis; new text end

new text begin (3) a detailed plan, with timelines, for the operator of the terminal or oil refinery to transition to firefighting foam that does not contain intentionally added PFAS chemicals for that specific use; and new text end

new text begin (4) a plan for meeting the requirements under subdivision 3. new text end

new text begin (c) The state fire marshal must ensure there is an opportunity for public comment during the waiver process. The state fire marshal must consider both information provided by the applicant and information provided through public comment when making a decision on whether to grant a waiver. The term of a waiver must not exceed two years. The state fire marshal must not grant a waiver for a specific use if any other terminal or oil refinery is known to have transitioned to commercially available class B firefighting foam that does not contain intentionally added PFAS chemicals for that specific use. All waivers must expire by January 1, 2028. A person that anticipates applying for a waiver for a terminal or oil refinery must submit a notice of intent to the state fire marshal by January 1, 2025, in order to be considered for a waiver beyond January 1, 2026. The state fire marshal must notify the waiver applicant of a decision within six months of the waiver submission date. new text end

new text begin (d) The state fire marshal must provide an applicant for a waiver under this subdivision an opportunity to: new text end

new text begin (1) correct deficiencies when applying for a waiver; and new text end

new text begin (2) provide evidence to dispute a determination that another terminal or oil refinery is known to have transitioned to commercially available class B firefighting foam that does not contain intentionally added PFAS chemicals for that specific use, including evidence that the specific use is different. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Use requirements. new text end

new text begin (a) A person that uses class B firefighting foam containing intentionally added PFAS chemicals under this section must: new text end

new text begin (1) implement tactics that have been demonstrated to prevent release directly to the environment, such as to unsealed ground, soakage pits, waterways, or uncontrolled drains; new text end

new text begin (2) attempt to fully contain all firefighting foams with PFAS on-site using demonstrated practices designed to contain all PFAS releases; new text end

new text begin (3) implement containment measures such as bunds and ponds that are controlled, are impervious to PFAS chemicals, and do not allow fire water, wastewater, runoff, and other wastes to be released to the environment, such as to soils, groundwater, waterways, or stormwater; and new text end

new text begin (4) dispose of all fire water, wastewater, runoff, impacted soils, and other wastes in a way that prevents releases to the environment. new text end

new text begin (b) A terminal or oil refinery that has received a waiver under this section may provide and use class B firefighting foam containing intentionally added PFAS chemicals in the form of mutual aid to another terminal or oil refinery at the request of authorities only if the other terminal or oil refinery also has a waiver. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective January 1, 2024. new text end

Sec. 32.

new text begin FIREFIGHTER TURNOUT GEAR; REPORT. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, in cooperation with the commissioner of health, must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources regarding perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in turnout gear by January 15, 2024. The report must include: new text end

new text begin (1) current turnout gear requirements and options for eliminating or reducing PFAS in turnout gear; new text end

new text begin (2) current turnout gear disposal methods and recommendations for future disposal to prevent PFAS contamination; and new text end

new text begin (3) recommendations and protocols for PFAS biomonitoring in firefighters, including a process for allowing firefighters to voluntarily register for biomonitoring. new text end

new text begin (b) For the purposes of this section, "turnout gear" is the personal protective equipment (PPE) used by firefighters. new text end

Sec. 33.

new text begin PFAS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must adopt rules establishing water quality standards for: new text end

new text begin (1) perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA); new text end

new text begin (2) perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS); new text end

new text begin (3) perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA); new text end

new text begin (4) hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid (HFPO-DA, commonly known as GenX chemicals); new text end

new text begin (5) perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS); and new text end

new text begin (6) perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS). new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner must adopt the rules establishing the water quality standards required under this section by July 1, 2026, and Minnesota Statutes, section 14.125, does not apply. new text end

Sec. 34.

new text begin HEALTH RISK LIMIT; PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE. new text end

new text begin By July 1, 2026, the commissioner of health must amend the health risk limit for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in Minnesota Rules, part 4717.7860, subpart 15, so that the health risk limit does not exceed 0.015 parts per billion. In amending the health risk limit for PFOS, the commissioner must comply with Minnesota Statutes, section 144.0751, requiring a reasonable margin of safety to adequately protect the health of infants, children, and adults. new text end

Sec. 35.

new text begin RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; REPORT. new text end

new text begin (a) By July 15, 2025, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must conduct a study and prepare a report that includes a pathway to implement resource management policies, programs, and infrastructure. The commissioner must submit the report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the senate and house of representatives committees with jurisdiction over environmental policy and finance and energy policy. The report must include: new text end

new text begin (1) an overview of how municipal solid waste is currently managed, including how much material is generated in the state and is reused, recycled, composted, digested, or disposed of; new text end

new text begin (2) a summary of infrastructure, programs, policies, and resources needed to reduce the amount of materials disposed of in landfills or incinerators statewide by more than 90 percent over a 2021 baseline by 2045 or sooner. The summary must include analysis and recommendations of scenarios above Waste-to-Energy on the state's Waste Hierarchy that maximizes the environmental benefits when meeting the 90 percent reduction target; new text end

new text begin (3) an analysis of: new text end

new text begin (i) waste prevention program impacts and opportunities; new text end

new text begin (ii) how much additional capacity is needed after prevention for reuse, recycling, composting, and anaerobic digestion systems to achieve that goal; and new text end

new text begin (iii) what steps can be taken to implement that additional capacity, including working collaboratively with local governments, industry, and community-based organizations to invest in such facilities and to work together to seek additional state and federal funding assistance; new text end

new text begin (4) strategic programmatic, regulatory, and policy initiatives that will be required to produce source reduction, rethink and redesign products and packaging to more efficiently use resources, and maximize diversion from disposal of materials in a way that prevents pollution and does not discharge to land, water, or air or threaten the environment or human health; new text end

new text begin (5) recommendations for reducing the environmental and human health impacts of waste management, especially across environmental justice areas as defined under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.03, and ensuring that the benefits of these resource management investments, including the creation of well-paying green jobs, flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized, underserved, and overburdened by pollution and that land, water, air, and climate impacts are considered; and new text end

new text begin (6) a review of feasibility, assumptions, costs, and milestones necessary to meet study goals. new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner must obtain input from counties and cities inside and outside the seven-county metropolitan area; reuse, recycling, and composting facilities; anaerobic digestion facilities; waste haulers; environmental organizations; community-based organizations; Tribal representatives; and diverse communities located in environmental justice areas that contain a waste facility. The commissioner must provide for an open public comment period of at least 60 days on the draft report. Written public comments and commissioner responses to all those comments must be included in the final report. new text end

Sec. 36.

new text begin REPORT REQUIRED; RECYCLING AND REUSING SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES AND INSTALLATION COMPONENTS. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency, in consultation with the commissioners of commerce and employment and economic development, must coordinate preparation of a report on developing a statewide system to reuse and recycle solar photovoltaic modules and installation components in the state. new text end

new text begin (b) The report must include options for a system to collect, reuse, and recycle solar photovoltaic modules and installation components at end of life. Any system option included in the report must be convenient and accessible throughout the state, recover 100 percent of discarded components, and maximize value and materials recovery. Any system option developed must include analysis of: new text end

new text begin (1) the reuse and recycling values of solar photovoltaic modules, installation components, and recovered materials; new text end

new text begin (2) system infrastructure and technology needs; new text end

new text begin (3) how to maximize in-state employment and economic development; new text end

new text begin (4) net costs for the program; and new text end

new text begin (5) potential benefits and negative impacts of the plan on environmental justice and Tribal communities. new text end

new text begin (c) The report must include a survey of solar photovoltaic modules and installation components that are currently coming out of service and those projected to come out of service in the future in Minnesota. The report must include a description of how solar photovoltaic modules and installation components are currently being managed at end of life and how they would likely be managed in the future without the proposed reuse and recycling system. new text end

new text begin (d) After completing the report, the commissioner must convene a working group to advise on developing policy recommendations for a statewide system to manage solar photovoltaic modules and installation components. The working group must include, but is not limited to: new text end

new text begin (1) the commissioners of commerce and employment and economic development or their designees; new text end

new text begin (2) representatives of the solar industry and electric utilities; new text end

new text begin (3) representatives of state, local, and Tribal governments; and new text end

new text begin (4) other relevant stakeholders. new text end

new text begin (e) By January 15, 2025, the commissioner must submit the report and the policy recommendations developed under this section to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources policy and finance and energy policy and finance. new text end

Sec. 37.

new text begin REVISOR INSTRUCTION. new text end

new text begin The revisor of statutes must change the term "master plan" or similar term to "plan" wherever the term appears in Minnesota Statutes, sections 473.803 to 473.8441. The revisor may make grammatical changes related to the term change. new text end

Sec. 38.

new text begin REPEALER. new text end

new text begin Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 115.44, subdivision 9; 116.011; 325E.389; and 325E.3891, new text end new text begin are repealed. new text end

ARTICLE 4

NATURAL RESOURCES

Section 1.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 6c. new text end

new text begin Restored prairie. new text end

new text begin "Restored prairie" means a restoration that uses at least 25 representative and biologically diverse native prairie plant species and that occurs on land that was previously cropped or used as pasture. new text end

Sec. 2.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.415, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Application, form.

The application for license or permit deleted text begin shall be in quadruplicate, and shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end include deleted text begin with each copydeleted text end a legal description of the lands or waters affected, a metes and bounds description of the required right-of-way, a map showing said features, and a detailed design of any structures necessary, or in lieu thereof shall be in such other form, and include such other descriptions, maps or designs, as the commissioner may require. The commissioner may at any time order such changes or modifications respecting construction or maintenance of structures or other conditions of the license or permit as the commissioner deems necessary to protect the public health and safety.

Sec. 3.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.415, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

Subd. 6.

Supplemental application fee and monitoring fee.

(a) In addition to the application fee and utility crossing fees specified in Minnesota Rules, the commissioner of natural resources shall assess the applicant for a utility license the following fees:

(1) deleted text begin adeleted text end new text begin to cover reasonable costs for reviewing an application and preparing a license, new text end supplemental application deleted text begin fee ofdeleted text end new text begin fees as follows:new text end

new text begin (i) new text end $1,750 for a public water crossing license and deleted text begin a supplemental application fee ofdeleted text end $3,000 for a public lands crossing licensedeleted text begin , to cover reasonable costs for reviewing the application and preparing the licensedeleted text end new text begin for electric power lines, cables, or conduits of 100 kilovolts or more and for main pipelines for gas, liquids, or solids in suspension;new text end

new text begin (ii) $1,000 for a public water crossing license and $1,000 for a public lands crossing license for applications to which item (i) does not apply; and new text end

new text begin (iii) for all applications, an additional $500 for each water crossing or land crossing in excess of two crossingsnew text end ; and

(2) a monitoring fee to cover the projected reasonable costs for monitoring the construction of the utility line and preparing special terms and conditions of the license to ensure proper construction. The commissioner must give the applicant an estimate of the monitoring fee before the applicant submits the fee.

(b) The applicant shall pay fees under this subdivision to the commissioner of natural resources. The commissioner shall not issue the license until the applicant has paid all fees in full.

(c) Upon completion of construction of the improvement for which the license or permit was issued, the commissioner shall refund the unobligated balance from the monitoring fee revenue. The commissioner shall not return the application fees, even if the application is withdrawn or denied.

deleted text begin (d) If the fees collected under paragraph (a), clause (1), are not sufficient to cover the costs of reviewing the applications and preparing the licenses, the commissioner shall improve efficiencies and otherwise reduce department costs and activities to ensure the revenues raised under paragraph (a), clause (1), are sufficient, and that no other funds are necessary to carry out the requirements. deleted text end

new text begin (d) For purposes of this subdivision: new text end

new text begin (1) "water crossing" means each location where the proposed utility will cross a public water between banks or shores; and new text end

new text begin (2) "land crossing" means each quarter-quarter section or government lot where the proposed utility will cross public land. new text end

Sec. 4.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.415, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

Subd. 7.

Application fee exemption.

(a) A utility license for crossing public lands or public waters is exempt from all application fees specified deleted text begin in this section anddeleted text end in rules adopted under this section.

(b) This subdivision does not apply to electric power lines, cables, or conduits 100 kilovolts or greater or to main pipelines for gas, liquids, or solids in suspension.

Sec. 5.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.415, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 9. new text end

new text begin Fees for renewing license. new text end

new text begin At the end of the license period, if both parties wish to renew a license, the commissioner must assess the applicant for all fees in this section as if the renewal is an application for a new license. new text end

Sec. 6.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.788, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Report of ownership transfers; fee.

(a) Application for transfer of ownership of an off-highway motorcycle registered under this section must be made to the commissioner within 15 days of the date of transfer.

(b) An application for transfer must be executed by the deleted text begin registereddeleted text end new text begin currentnew text end owner and the purchaser using a bill of sale that includes the vehicle serial number.

(c) The purchaser is subject to the penalties imposed by section 84.774 if the purchaser fails to apply for transfer of ownership as provided under this subdivision.

Sec. 7.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.82, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Application, issuance, issuing fee.

(a) Application for registration or reregistration shall be made to the commissioner or an authorized deputy registrar of motor vehicles in a format prescribed by the commissioner and shall state the legal name and address of every owner of the snowmobile.

(b) A person who purchases a snowmobile from a retail dealer shall make application for registration to the dealer at the point of sale. The dealer shall issue a dealer temporary 21-day registration permit to each purchaser who applies to the dealer for registration. The temporary permit must contain the dealer's identification number and phone number. Each retail dealer shall submit completed registration and fees to the deputy registrar at least once a week. No fee may be charged by a dealer to a purchaser for providing the temporary permit.

(c) Upon receipt of the application and the appropriate fee, the commissioner or deputy registrar shall issue to the applicant, or provide to the dealer, an assigned registration number or a commissioner or deputy registrar temporary 21-day permit.new text begin The registration number must be printed on a registration decal issued by the commissioner or a deputy registrar.new text end Once issued, the registration deleted text begin numberdeleted text end new text begin decalnew text end must be affixed to the snowmobile in a clearly visible and permanent manner for enforcement purposes deleted text begin as the commissioner of natural resources shall prescribedeleted text end new text begin according to subdivision 3bnew text end . A dealer subject to paragraph (b) shall provide the registration materials or temporary permit to the purchaser within the temporary 21-day permit period. The registration is not valid unless signed by at least one owner.

(d) Each deputy registrar of motor vehicles acting pursuant to section 168.33 shall also be a deputy registrar of snowmobiles. The commissioner of natural resources in agreement with the commissioner of public safety may prescribe the accounting and procedural requirements necessary to ensure efficient handling of registrations and registration fees. Deputy registrars shall strictly comply with these accounting and procedural requirements.

(e) In addition to other fees prescribed by law, an issuing fee of $4.50 is charged for each snowmobile registration renewal, duplicate or replacement registration card, and replacement decal, and an issuing fee of $7 is charged for each snowmobile registration and registration transfer issued by:

(1) a registrar or a deputy registrar and must be deposited in the manner provided in section 168.33, subdivision 2; or

(2) the commissioner and must be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund.

Sec. 8.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.82, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 3b. new text end

new text begin Display of registration decal. new text end

new text begin (a) A person must not operate a snowmobile in the state or allow another to operate the person's snowmobile in the state unless the snowmobile has its unexpired registration decal affixed to each side of the snowmobile and the decals are legible. new text end

new text begin (b) The registration decal must be affixed: new text end

new text begin (1) for snowmobiles made after June 30, 1972, in the areas provided by the manufacturer under section 84.821, subdivision 2; and new text end

new text begin (2) for all other snowmobiles, on each side of the cowling on the upper half of the snowmobile. new text end

new text begin (c) When any previously affixed registration decal is destroyed or lost, a duplicate must be affixed in the same manner as provided in paragraph (b). new text end

Sec. 9.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.821, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Area for registration number.

All snowmobiles made after June 30, 1972, and sold in Minnesota, shall be designed and made to provide an area on which to affix the registration deleted text begin numberdeleted text end new text begin decalnew text end . deleted text begin This area shall be at a location and of dimensions prescribed by rule of the commissioner.deleted text end new text begin A clear area must be provided on each side of the cowling with a minimum size of 3-1/2 square inches and at least 12 inches from the ground when the machine is resting on a hard surface.new text end

Sec. 10.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.84, is amended to read:

84.84 TRANSFER OR TERMINATION OF SNOWMOBILE OWNERSHIP.

(a) Within 15 days after the transfer of ownership, or any part thereof, other than a security interest, or the destruction or abandonment of any snowmobile, written notice of the transfer or destruction or abandonment shall be given to the commissioner in such form as the commissioner shall prescribe.

(b) An application for transfer must be executed by the deleted text begin registereddeleted text end new text begin currentnew text end owner and the purchaser using a bill of sale that includes the vehicle serial number.

(c) The purchaser is subject to the penalties imposed by section 84.88 if the purchaser fails to apply for transfer of ownership as provided under this subdivision. Every owner or part owner of a snowmobile shall, upon failure to give notice of destruction or abandonment, be subject to the penalties imposed by section 84.88.

Sec. 11.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.86, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Required rulesnew text begin , fees, and reportsnew text end .

new text begin (a) new text end With a view of achieving maximum use of snowmobiles consistent with protection of the environment the commissioner of natural resources shall adopt rules in the manner provided by chapter 14, for the following purposes:

(1) registration of snowmobiles deleted text begin and display of registration numbers.deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

(2) use of snowmobiles insofar as game and fish resources are affecteddeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

(3) use of snowmobiles on public lands and waters, or on grant-in-aid trailsdeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

(4) uniform signs to be used by the state, counties, and cities, which are necessary or desirable to control, direct, or regulate the operation and use of snowmobilesdeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

(5) specifications relating to snowmobile mufflersdeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ; andnew text end

(6) a comprehensive snowmobile information and safety education and training programdeleted text begin , includingdeleted text end new text begin that includesnew text end butnew text begin isnew text end not limited to deleted text begin the preparation and dissemination ofdeleted text end new text begin preparing and disseminatingnew text end snowmobile information and safety advice to the public, deleted text begin thedeleted text end training deleted text begin ofdeleted text end snowmobile operators, and deleted text begin the issuance ofdeleted text end new text begin issuingnew text end snowmobile safety certificates to snowmobile operators who successfully complete the snowmobile safety education and training course.

new text begin (b)new text end For the purpose of administering deleted text begin suchdeleted text end new text begin thenew text end programnew text begin under paragraph (a), clause (6),new text end and to defray expenses of training and certifying snowmobile operators, the commissioner shall collect a fee from each person who receives the youth or adult training. The commissioner shall collect a fee, to include a $1 issuing fee for licensing agents, for issuing a duplicate snowmobile safety certificate. The commissioner shall establish both fees in a manner that neither significantly overrecovers nor underrecovers costs, including overhead costs, involved in providing the services. The fees are not subject to the rulemaking provisions of chapter 14, and section 14.386 does not apply. The fees may be established by the commissioner notwithstanding section 16A.1283. The fees, except for the issuing fee for licensing agents under this subdivision, shall be deposited in the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund and the amount thereof, except for the electronic licensing system commission established by the commissioner under section 84.027, subdivision 15, and issuing fees collected by the commissioner, is appropriated annually to the Enforcement Division of the Department of Natural Resources for deleted text begin the administration of suchdeleted text end new text begin administering thenew text end programs. In addition to the fee established by the commissioner, instructors may charge each person any fee paid by the instructor for the person's online training course and up to the established fee amount for class materials and expenses. The commissioner shall cooperate with private organizations and associations, private and public corporations, and local governmental units in furtherance of the program established under deleted text begin thisdeleted text end new text begin paragraph (a),new text end clausenew text begin (6)new text end . School districts may cooperate with the commissioner and volunteer instructors to provide space for the classroom portion of the training. The commissioner shall consult with the commissioner of public safety in regard to training program subject matter and performance testing that leads to the certification of snowmobile operators.

deleted text begin (7)deleted text end new text begin (c)new text end The operator of any snowmobile involved in an accident resulting in injury requiring medical attention or hospitalization to or death of any person or total damage to an extent of $500 or more, shall forward a written report of the accident to the commissioner on deleted text begin suchdeleted text end new text begin anew text end form deleted text begin asdeleted text end new text begin prescribed bynew text end the commissioner deleted text begin shall prescribedeleted text end . If the operator is killed or is unable to file a report due to incapacitation, any peace officer investigating the accident shall file the accident report within ten business days.

Sec. 12.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.87, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Operation on streets and highways.

(a) No person shall operate a snowmobile upon the roadway, shoulder, or inside bank or slope of any trunk, county state-aid, or county highway in this state and, in the case of a divided trunk or county highway, on the right-of-way between the opposing lanes of traffic, except as provided in sections 84.81 to 84.90. No person shall operate a snowmobile within the right-of-way of any trunk, county state-aid, or county highway between the hours of one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise, except on the right-hand side of such right-of-way and in the same direction as the highway traffic on the nearest lane of the roadway adjacent thereto. No snowmobile shall be operated at any time within the right-of-way of any interstate highway or freeway within this state.

(b) Notwithstanding any provision of paragraph (a) to the contrary:

(1) under conditions prescribed by the commissioner of transportation, the commissioner of transportation may allow two-way operation of snowmobiles on either side of the trunk highway right-of-way where the commissioner of transportation determines that two-way operation will not endanger users of the trunk highway or riders of the snowmobiles using the trail;

(2) under conditions prescribed by a local road authority as defined in section 160.02, subdivision 25, the road authority may allow two-way operation of snowmobiles on either side of the right-of-way of a street or highway under the road authority's jurisdiction, where the road authority determines that two-way operation will not endanger users of the street or highway or riders of the snowmobiles using the trail;

(3) the commissioner of transportation under clause (1) and the local road authority under clause (2) shall notify the commissioner of natural resources and the local law enforcement agencies responsible for the streets or highways of the locations of two-way snowmobile trails authorized under this paragraph; and

(4) two-way snowmobile trails authorized under this paragraph shall be posted for two-way operation at the authorized locations.

(c) A snowmobile may make a direct crossing of a street or highway at any hour of the day provided:

(1) the crossing is made at an angle of approximately 90 degrees to the direction of the highway and at a place where no obstruction prevents a quick and safe crossing;

(2) the snowmobile is brought to a complete stop before crossing the shoulder or main traveled way of the highway;

(3) the driver yields the right-of-way to all oncoming traffic which constitutes an immediate hazard;

(4) in crossing a divided highway, the crossing is made only at an intersection of such highway with another public street or highwaynew text begin or at a safe location approved by the road authoritynew text end ;

(5) if the crossing is made between the hours of one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise or in conditions of reduced visibility, only if both front and rear lights are on; and

(6) a snowmobile may be operated upon a bridge, other than a bridge that is part of the main traveled lanes of an interstate highway, when required for the purpose of avoiding obstructions to travel when no other method of avoidance is possible; provided the snowmobile is operated in the extreme right-hand lane, the entrance to the roadway is made within 100 feet of the bridge and the crossing is made without undue delay.

(d) No snowmobile shall be operated upon a public street or highway unless it is equipped with at least one headlamp, one tail lamp, each of minimum candlepower as prescribed by rules of the commissioner, reflector material of a minimum area of 16 square inches mounted on each side forward of the handle bars, and with brakes each of which shall conform to standards prescribed by rule of the commissioner pursuant to the authority vested in the commissioner by section 84.86, and each of which shall be subject to approval of the commissioner of public safety.

(e) A snowmobile may be operated upon a public street or highway other than as provided by paragraph (c) in an emergency during the period of time when and at locations where snow upon the roadway renders travel by automobile impractical.

(f) All provisions of chapters 169 and 169A shall apply to the operation of snowmobiles upon streets and highways, except for those relating to required equipment, and except those which by their nature have no application. Section 169.09 applies to the operation of snowmobiles anywhere in the state or on the ice of any boundary water of the state.

(g) Any sled, trailer, or other device being towed by a snowmobile must be equipped with reflective materials as required by rule of the commissioner.

Sec. 13.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.90, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

Subd. 7.

Penalty.

new text begin (a) new text end A person violating the provisions of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.

new text begin (b) Notwithstanding section 609.101, subdivision 4, clause (2), the minimum fine for a person who operates an off-highway motorcycle, off-road vehicle, all-terrain vehicle, or snowmobile in violation of this section must not be less than the amount set forth in section 84.775. new text end

Sec. 14.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.922, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4.

Report of transfers.

(a) Application for transfer of ownership must be made to the commissioner within 15 days of the date of transfer.

(b) An application for transfer must be executed by the deleted text begin registereddeleted text end new text begin currentnew text end owner and the purchaser using a bill of sale that includes the vehicle serial number.

(c) The purchaser is subject to the penalties imposed by section 84.774 if the purchaser fails to apply for transfer of ownership as provided under this subdivision.

Sec. 15.

new text begin [84.9735] INSECTICIDES ON STATE LANDS. new text end

new text begin A person may not use a pesticide containing an insecticide in a wildlife management area, state park, state forest, aquatic management area, or scientific and natural area if the insecticide is from the neonicotinoid class of insecticides or contains chlorpyrifos. new text end

Sec. 16.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.992, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Program.

The commissioner of natural resources shall developnew text begin and implementnew text end a program for the Minnesota Naturalist Corps that supports state parksnew text begin and trailsnew text end in providing interpretation of the natural and cultural features of state parksnew text begin and trailsnew text end in order to enhance visitors' awareness, understanding, and appreciation of those features and encourages the wise and sustainable use of the environment.

Sec. 17.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.992, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Eligibility.

A person is eligible to enroll in the Minnesota Naturalist Corps if the persondeleted text begin :deleted text end

deleted text begin (1) is a permanent resident of the state; deleted text end

deleted text begin (2)deleted text end is a participant in an approved college internship program deleted text begin in a field related to natural resources, cultural history, interpretation, or conservation; anddeleted text end

deleted text begin (3) has completed at least one year of postsecondary educationdeleted text end .

Sec. 18.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84D.02, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Management plan.

new text begin By December 31, 2023, and every five years thereafter, new text end the commissioner shall prepare deleted text begin and maintaindeleted text end a long-term plan, which may include specific plans for individual species and actions, for the statewide management of invasive species of aquatic plants and wild animals. The plan must address:

(1) coordinated detection and prevention of accidental introductions;

(2) coordinated dissemination of information about invasive species of aquatic plants and wild animals among resource management agencies and organizations;

(3) a coordinated public education and awareness campaign;

(4) coordinated control of selected invasive species of aquatic plants and wild animals on lands and public waters;

(5) participation by lake associations, local citizen groups, and local units of government in the development and implementation of local management efforts;

(6) a reasonable and workable inspection requirement for watercraft and equipment including those participating in organized events on the waters of the state;

(7) the closing of points of access to infested waters, if the commissioner determines it is necessary, for a total of not more than seven days during the open water season for control or eradication purposes;

(8) maintaining public accesses on infested waters to be reasonably free of aquatic macrophytes; deleted text begin anddeleted text end

(9) notice to travelers of the penalties for violation of laws relating to invasive species of aquatic plants and wild animalsnew text begin ; andnew text end

new text begin (10) the impacts of climate change on invasive species managementnew text end .

Sec. 19.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84D.10, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Removal and confinement.

(a) A conservation officer or other licensed peace officer may order:

(1) the removal of aquatic macrophytes or prohibited invasive species from water-related equipment, including decontamination using hot water or high pressure equipment deleted text begin when available on sitedeleted text end , before the water-related equipment is transported or before it is placed into waters of the state;

(2) confinement of the water-related equipment at a mooring, dock, or other location until the water-related equipment is removed from the water;

(3) removal of water-related equipment from waters of the state to remove prohibited invasive species if the water has not been listed by the commissioner as being infested with that species;

(4) a prohibition on placing water-related equipment into waters of the state when the water-related equipment has aquatic macrophytes or prohibited invasive species attached in violation of subdivision 1 or when water has not been drained or the drain plug has not been removed in violation of subdivision 4; and

(5) decontamination of water-related equipment deleted text begin when available on sitedeleted text end .

(b) An order for removal of prohibited invasive species under paragraph (a), clause (1), or decontamination of water-related equipment under paragraph (a), clause (5), may include tagging the water-related equipment and issuing a notice that specifies a time frame for completing the removal or decontamination and reinspection of the water-related equipment.

(c) An inspector who is not a licensed peace officer may issue orders under paragraph (a), clauses (1), (3), (4), and (5).

Sec. 20.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 85.015, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

Subd. 10.

Luce Line Trail, Hennepin, McLeod, and Meeker Counties.

(a) The trail shall originate at Gleason Lake in Plymouth Village, Hennepin County, deleted text begin and shalldeleted text end follow the route of the Chicago Northwestern Railroadnew text begin , and include a connection to Greenleaf Lake State Recreation Areanew text end .

(b) The trail shall be developed for multiuse wherever feasible. The department shall cooperate in maintaining its integrity for modes of use consistent with local ordinances.

(c) In establishing, developing, maintaining, and operating the trail, the commissioner shall cooperate with local units of government and private individuals and groups. Before acquiring any parcel of land for the trail, the commissioner of natural resources shall develop a management program for the parcel and conduct a public hearing on the proposed management program in the vicinity of the parcel to be acquired. The management program of the commissioner shall include but not be limited to the following:

(1) fencing deleted text begin ofdeleted text end portions of the trail where necessary to protect adjoining landowners; and

(2) deleted text begin the maintenance ofdeleted text end new text begin maintainingnew text end the trail in a deleted text begin litter freedeleted text end new text begin litter-freenew text end condition to the extent practicable.

(d) The commissioner shall not acquire any of the right-of-way of the Chicago Northwestern Railway Company until the abandonment of the line described in this subdivision has been approved by the Surface Transportation Board or the former Interstate Commerce Commission. Compensation, in addition to the value of the land, shall include improvements made by the railroad, including but not limited to, bridges, trestles, public road crossings, or any portion thereof, it being the desire of the railroad that such improvements be included in the conveyance. The fair market value of the land and improvements shall be recommended by two independent appraisers mutually agreed upon by the parties. The fair market value thus recommended shall be reviewed by a review appraiser agreed to by the parties, and the fair market value thus determined, and supported by appraisals, may be the purchase price. The commissioner may exchange lands with landowners abutting the right-of-way described in this section to eliminate diagonally shaped separate fields.

Sec. 21.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 85.052, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

Subd. 6.

State park reservation system.

(a) The commissioner may, by written order, develop reasonable reservation policies for deleted text begin campsites and otherdeleted text end new text begin using camping,new text end lodgingnew text begin , and day-use facilities and for tours, educational programs, seminars, events, and rentalsnew text end . The policies are exempt from the rulemaking provisions under chapter 14, and section 14.386 does not apply.

(b) The revenue collected from the state park reservation fee established under subdivision 5, including interest earned, deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be deposited in the state park account in the natural resources fund and is annually appropriated to the commissioner for the cost of operating the state park reservation and point-of-sale system.

Sec. 22.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.005, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 11a. new text end

new text begin Other commercial operation. new text end

new text begin "Other commercial operation" means use of a watercraft for work, rather than recreation, to transport equipment, goods, and materials on public waters. new text end

Sec. 23.

new text begin [86B.30] DEFINITIONS. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Applicability. new text end

new text begin The definitions in this section apply to sections 86B.30 to 86B.341. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Accompanying operator. new text end

new text begin "Accompanying operator" means a person 21 years of age or older who: new text end

new text begin (1) is in a personal watercraft or other type of motorboat; new text end

new text begin (2) is within immediate reach of the controls of the motor; and new text end

new text begin (3) possesses a valid operator's permit or is an exempt operator. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Adult operator. new text end

new text begin "Adult operator" means a motorboat operator, including a personal watercraft operator, who is 12 years of age or older and who was: new text end

new text begin (1) effective July 1, 2025, born on or after July 1, 2004; new text end

new text begin (2) effective July 1, 2026, born on or after July 1, 2000; new text end

new text begin (3) effective July 1, 2027, born on or after July 1, 1996; and new text end

new text begin (4) effective July 1, 2028, born on or after July 1, 1987. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Exempt operator. new text end

new text begin "Exempt operator" means a motorboat operator, including a personal watercraft operator, who is 12 years of age or older and who: new text end

new text begin (1) possesses a valid license to operate a motorboat issued for maritime personnel by the United States Coast Guard under Code of Federal Regulations, title 46, part 10, or a marine certificate issued by the Canadian government; new text end

new text begin (2) is not a resident of the state, is temporarily using the waters of the state for a period not to exceed 60 days, and: new text end

new text begin (i) meets any applicable requirements of the state or country of residency; or new text end

new text begin (ii) possesses a Canadian pleasure craft operator's card; new text end

new text begin (3) is operating a motorboat under a dealer's license according to section 86B.405; or new text end

new text begin (4) is operating a motorboat during an emergency. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Motorboat rental business. new text end

new text begin "Motorboat rental business" means a person engaged in the business of renting or leasing motorboats, including personal watercraft, for a period not exceeding 30 days. Motorboat rental business includes a person's agents and employees but does not include a resort business. new text end

new text begin Subd. 6. new text end

new text begin Resort business. new text end

new text begin "Resort business" means a person that is engaged in the business of providing lodging and recreational services to transient guests and that is classified as a resort under section 273.13, subdivision 22 or 25. A resort business includes a person's agents and employees. new text end

new text begin Subd. 7. new text end

new text begin Young operator. new text end

new text begin "Young operator" means a motorboat operator, including a personal watercraft operator, younger than 12 years of age. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 24.

new text begin [86B.302] WATERCRAFT OPERATOR'S PERMIT. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Generally. new text end

new text begin The commissioner must issue a watercraft operator's permit to a person 12 years of age or older who successfully completes a water safety course and written test according to section 86B.304, paragraph (a), or who provides proof of completing a program subject to a reciprocity agreement or certified by the commissioner as substantially similar. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Issuing permit to certain young operators. new text end

new text begin The commissioner may issue a permit under this section to a person who is at least 11 years of age, but the permit is not valid until the person becomes an adult operator. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Personal possession required. new text end

new text begin (a) A person who is required to have a watercraft operator's permit must have in personal possession: new text end

new text begin (1) a valid watercraft operator's permit; new text end

new text begin (2) a driver's license that has a valid watercraft operator's permit indicator issued under section 171.07, subdivision 20; or new text end

new text begin (3) an identification card that has a valid watercraft operator's permit indicator issued under section 171.07, subdivision 20. new text end

new text begin (b) A person who is required to have a watercraft operator's permit must display one of the documents described in paragraph (a) to a conservation officer or peace officer upon request. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Using electronic device to display proof of permit. new text end

new text begin If a person uses an electronic device to display a document described in subdivision 3 to a conservation officer or peace officer: new text end

new text begin (1) the officer is immune from liability for any damage to the device, unless the officer does not exercise due care in handling the device; and new text end

new text begin (2) this does not constitute consent for the officer to access other contents on the device. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 25.

new text begin [86B.303] OPERATING PERSONAL WATERCRAFT AND OTHER MOTORBOATS. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Adult operators. new text end

new text begin An adult operator may not operate a motorboat, including a personal watercraft, unless: new text end

new text begin (1) the adult operator possesses a valid watercraft operator's permit; new text end

new text begin (2) the adult operator is an exempt operator; or new text end

new text begin (3) an accompanying operator is in the motorboat. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Young operators. new text end

new text begin (a) A young operator may not operate a personal watercraft or any motorboat powered by a motor with a factory rating of more than 75 horsepower. new text end

new text begin (b) A young operator may operate a motorboat that is not a personal watercraft and that is powered by a motor with a factory rating of less than 75 horsepower if an accompanying operator is in the motorboat. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Accompanying operators. new text end

new text begin For purposes of this section and section 169A.20, an accompanying operator, as well as the actual operator, is operating and is in physical control of a motorboat. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Owners may not allow unlawful use. new text end

new text begin An owner or other person in lawful control of a motorboat may not allow the motorboat to be operated contrary to this section. new text end

new text begin Subd. 5. new text end

new text begin Exception for low-powered motorboats. new text end

new text begin Notwithstanding the other provisions of this section, a person of any age may operate a motorboat that is not a personal watercraft that is powered by a motor with a factory rating of 25 horsepower or less without possessing a valid watercraft operator's permit and without an accompanying operator in the motorboat. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 26.

new text begin [86B.304] WATERCRAFT SAFETY PROGRAM. new text end

new text begin (a) The commissioner must establish a water safety course and testing program for personal watercraft and watercraft operators and must prescribe a written test as part of the course. The course must be approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and must be available online. The commissioner may allow designated water safety courses administered by third parties to meet the requirements of this paragraph and may enter into reciprocity agreements or otherwise certify boat safety education programs from other states that are substantially similar to in-state programs. The commissioner must establish a working group of interested parties to develop course content and implementation. The course must include content on best management practices for mitigating aquatic invasive species, reducing conflicts among user groups, and limiting the ecological impacts of watercraft. new text end

new text begin (b) The commissioner must create or designate a short boater safety examination to be administered by motorboat rental businesses, as required by section 86B.306, subdivision 3. The examination developed under this paragraph must be one that can be administered electronically or on paper, at the option of the motorboat rental business administering the examination. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 27.

new text begin [86B.306] MOTORBOAT RENTAL BUSINESSES. new text end

new text begin Subdivision 1. new text end

new text begin Requirements. new text end

new text begin A motorboat rental business must not rent or lease a motorboat, including a personal watercraft, to any person for operation on waters of this state unless the renter or lessee: new text end

new text begin (1) has a valid watercraft operator's permit or is an exempt operator; and new text end

new text begin (2) is 18 years of age or older. new text end

new text begin Subd. 2. new text end

new text begin Authorized operators. new text end

new text begin A motorboat rental business must list on each motorboat rental or lease agreement the name and age of each operator who is authorized to operate the motorboat or personal watercraft. The renter or lessee of the motorboat must ensure that only listed authorized operators operate the motorboat or personal watercraft. new text end

new text begin Subd. 3. new text end

new text begin Summary of boating regulations; examination. new text end

new text begin (a) A motorboat rental business must provide each authorized operator a summary of the statutes and rules governing operation of motorboats and personal watercraft in the state and instructions for safe operation. new text end

new text begin (b) Each authorized operator, other than those holding a valid watercraft operator's permit or an exempt operator, must review the summary provided under this subdivision and must take a short boater safety examination in a form approved by the commissioner before the motorboat or personal watercraft leaves the motorboat rental business premises, unless the authorized operator has taken the examination during the previous 180 days. new text end

new text begin Subd. 4. new text end

new text begin Safety equipment for personal watercraft. new text end

new text begin A motorboat rental business must provide to all persons who rent a personal watercraft, at no additional cost, a United States Coast Guard (USCG) approved wearable personal flotation device with a USCG label indicating it either is approved for or does not prohibit use with personal watercraft or water-skiing and any other required safety equipment. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 28.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.313, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4.

Dealers deleted text begin and rental operationsdeleted text end .

(a) A dealer of personal watercraft shall distribute a summary of the laws and rules governing the operation of personal watercraft and, upon request, shall provide instruction to a purchaser regarding:

(1) the laws and rules governing personal watercraft; and

(2) the safe operation of personal watercraft.

(b) deleted text begin A person who offers personal watercraft for rent:deleted text end

deleted text begin (1) shall provide a summary of the laws and rules governing the operation of personal watercraft and provide instruction regarding the laws and rules and the safe operation of personal watercraft to each person renting a personal watercraft; deleted text end

deleted text begin (2) shall provide a United States Coast Guard (USCG) approved wearable personal flotation device with a USCG label indicating it either is approved for or does not prohibit use with personal watercraft or water-skiing and any other required safety equipment to all persons who rent a personal watercraft at no additional cost; and deleted text end

deleted text begin (3) shall require that a watercraft operator's permit from this state or from the operator's state of residence be shown each time a personal watercraft is rented to any person younger than age 18 and shall record the permit on the form provided by the commissioner. deleted text end

deleted text begin (c)deleted text end Each dealer of personal watercraft deleted text begin or person offering personal watercraft for rentdeleted text end shall have the person who purchases deleted text begin or rentsdeleted text end a personal watercraft sign a form provided by the commissioner acknowledging that the purchaser deleted text begin or renterdeleted text end has been provided a copy of the laws and rules regarding personal watercraft operation and has read them. The form must be retained by the dealer deleted text begin or person offering personal watercraft for rentdeleted text end for deleted text begin a period deleted text end deleted text begin ofdeleted text end six months following the date of signature and must be made available for inspection by sheriff's deputies or conservation officers during normal business hours.

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective July 1, 2025. new text end

Sec. 29.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1.

Watercraft 19 feet or less.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) and subdivision 1a, the fee for a watercraft license for watercraft 19 feet or less in length is deleted text begin $27deleted text end new text begin $59new text end .

(b) The watercraft license feenew text begin isnew text end :

(1) for watercraft, other than personal watercraft, 19 feet in length or less that is offered for rent or lease, deleted text begin the fee is $9deleted text end new text begin $14new text end ;

(2) for a sailboat, 19 feet in length or less, deleted text begin the fee is $10.50deleted text end new text begin $23new text end ;

(3) for a watercraft 19 feet in length or less used by a nonprofit corporation for teaching boat and water safety, deleted text begin the fee isdeleted text end as provided in subdivision 4;

(4) for a watercraft owned by a dealer under a dealer's license, deleted text begin the fee isdeleted text end as provided in subdivision 5;

(5) for a personal watercraft, deleted text begin the fee is $37.50deleted text end new text begin including one offered for rent or lease, $85new text end ; and

(6) for a watercraft less than 17 feet in length, other than a watercraft listed in clauses (1) to (5), deleted text begin the fee is $18deleted text end new text begin $36new text end .

Sec. 30.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

Subd. 1a.

Canoes, kayaks, sailboards, paddleboards, paddleboats, or rowing shells.

The fee for a watercraft license for a canoe, kayak, sailboard, paddleboard, paddleboat, or rowing shell over ten feet in length is deleted text begin $10.50deleted text end new text begin $23new text end .

Sec. 31.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Watercraft over 19 feet.

Except as provided in subdivisions 1a, 3, 4, and 5, the watercraft license fee:

(1) for a watercraft more than 19 feet but less than 26 feet in length is deleted text begin $45deleted text end new text begin $113new text end ;

(2) for a watercraft 26 feet but less than 40 feet in length is deleted text begin $67.50deleted text end new text begin $164new text end ; and

(3) for a watercraft 40 feet in length or longer is deleted text begin $90deleted text end new text begin $209new text end .

Sec. 32.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Watercraft deleted text begin over 19 feetdeleted text end for deleted text begin hiredeleted text end new text begin commercial usenew text end .

The license fee for deleted text begin adeleted text end watercraft deleted text begin more than 19 feet in length for hire with an operatordeleted text end new text begin used primarily for charter fishing, commercial fishing, commercial passenger carrying, or other commercial operationnew text end is deleted text begin $75deleted text end new text begin $164new text end each.

Sec. 33.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4.

Watercraft used by nonprofit corporation for teaching.

The watercraft license fee for a watercraft used by a nonprofit organization for teaching boat and water safety is deleted text begin $4.50deleted text end new text begin $8new text end each.

Sec. 34.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 86B.415, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Dealer's license.

There is no separate fee for watercraft owned by a dealer under a dealer's license. The fee for a dealer's license is deleted text begin $67.50deleted text end new text begin $142new text end .

Sec. 35.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 89A.03, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Membership regulation.

Terms, compensation, nomination, appointment, and removal of council members are governed by section 15.059new text begin , except that a council member may be compensated at the rate of up to $125 a daynew text end .

Sec. 36.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 89A.11, is amended to read:

89A.11 SUNSET.

Sections 89A.01; 89A.02; 89A.03; 89A.04; 89A.05; 89A.06; 89A.07; 89A.08; 89A.09; 89A.10; 89A.105; and 89A.11 expire June 30, deleted text begin 2028deleted text end new text begin 2033new text end .

Sec. 37.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 90.181, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Deferred payments.

(a) If the amount of the statement is not paidnew text begin or the payment is not postmarkednew text end within 30 days of thenew text begin statementnew text end date deleted text begin thereof, it shall beardeleted text end new text begin , the amount bearsnew text end interest at the rate determined pursuant to section 16A.124, except that the purchaser deleted text begin shall not bedeleted text end new text begin is notnew text end required to pay interest that totals $1 or less. If the amount is not paid within 60 days, the commissioner shall place the account in the hands of the commissioner of revenue according to chapter 16D, who shall proceed to collect the deleted text begin samedeleted text end new text begin amount duenew text end . When deemed in the best interests of the state, the commissioner shall take possession of the timber for which an amount is due wherever it may be found and sell the deleted text begin samedeleted text end new text begin timbernew text end informally or at public auction after giving reasonable notice.

(b) The proceeds of the sale deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be applied, first, to the payment of the expenses of seizure and saledeleted text begin ;deleted text end and, second, to the payment of the amount due for the timber, with interestdeleted text begin ; anddeleted text end new text begin .new text end The surplus, if any, deleted text begin shall belongdeleted text end new text begin belongsnew text end to the statedeleted text begin ; and,deleted text end new text begin .new text end In case a sufficient amount is not realized to pay these amounts in full, the balance deleted text begin shalldeleted text end new text begin mustnew text end be collected by the attorney general. deleted text begin Neitherdeleted text end Payment of the amount, deleted text begin nor thedeleted text end recovery of judgment deleted text begin therefordeleted text end new text begin for the amountnew text end , deleted text begin nordeleted text end satisfaction of the judgment, deleted text begin nor thedeleted text end new text begin ornew text end seizure and sale of timberdeleted text begin , shalldeleted text end new text begin does not:new text end

new text begin (1)new text end release the sureties on any security deposit given pursuant to this chapterdeleted text begin , ordeleted text end new text begin ;new text end

new text begin (2)new text end preclude the state from afterwards claiming that the timber was cut or removed contrary to law and recovering damages for the trespass thereby committeddeleted text begin ,deleted text end new text begin ;new text end or

new text begin (3) preclude the statenew text end from prosecuting the offender criminally.

Sec. 38.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.015, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

new text begin Subd. 32b. new text end

new text begin Native swan. new text end

new text begin "Native swan" means a trumpeter swan or a tundra swan but does not include a mute swan. new text end

Sec. 39.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.015, subdivision 51, is amended to read:

Subd. 51.

Unloaded.

"Unloaded" means, with reference to a firearm, without ammunition in the barrels and magazine, if the magazine is in the firearm. A muzzle-loading firearm deleted text begin withdeleted text end new text begin is unloaded if:new text end

new text begin (1) fornew text end a flintlock ignition deleted text begin is unloaded ifdeleted text end new text begin ,new text end it does not have priming powder in a pandeleted text begin . A muzzle-loading firearm withdeleted text end new text begin ;new text end

new text begin (2) for anew text end percussion ignition deleted text begin is unloaded ifdeleted text end new text begin ,new text end it does not have a percussion cap on a nippledeleted text begin .deleted text end new text begin ;new text end

new text begin (3) for an electronic ignition system, the battery is removed and is disconnected from the firearm; and new text end

new text begin (4) for an encapsulated powder charge ignition system, the primer and powder charge are removed from the firearm. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective the day following final enactment. new text end

Sec. 40.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.031, is amended to read:

97A.031 WANTON WASTE.

new text begin (a) new text end Unless expressly allowed, a person may not wantonly waste or destroy a usable part of a protected wild animal.

new text begin (b) This section does not apply to common carp. new text end

Sec. 41.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.045, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Power to prescribe form of permits and licenses.

new text begin (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), new text end the commissioner may prescribe the form of permits, licenses, and tags issued under the game and fish laws.

new text begin (b) The commissioner must offer an applicant for an angling, trapping, or hunting license, including a special permit issued under section 97A.401, the option of receiving the license in either a paper or paperless format and must provide an applicant with a paperless license unless the applicant requests a paper license. This paragraph applies to both annual and lifetime licenses. The commissioner must ensure that a person authorized to issue an annual license described in this paragraph has the ability to issue paperless licenses. new text end

new text begin EFFECTIVE DATE. new text end

new text begin This section is effective March 1, 2026. new text end

Sec. 42.

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.126, is amended to read:

97A.126 WALK-IN ACCESS PROGRAM.

Subdivision 1.

Establishment.

A walk-in access program is established to provide public access to wildlife habitat on private land for hunting, new text begin bird-watching, nature photography, and similar compatible uses, new text end excluding trapping, as provided under this section. The commissioner may enter into agreements with other units of government and landowners to provide private land hunting access.

Subd. 2.

Use of enrolled lands.

(a) From September 1 to May 31, a person must have a walk-in access deleted text begin hunterdeleted text end validation in possession to huntnew text begin , photograph, and watch wildlifenew text end on private lands, including agricultural lands, that are posted as being enrolled in the walk-in access program.

(b) Huntingnew text begin , bird-watching, nature photography, and similar compatible usesnew text end on private lands that are posted as enrolled in the walk-in access program is allowed from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset.

(c) deleted text begin Hunterdeleted text end Access on private lands that are posted as enrolled in the walk-in access program is restricted to nonmotorized use, except by deleted text begin huntersdeleted text end new text begin