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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.4900 TEACHERS OF VISUAL ARTS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of visual arts is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop an understanding of the creative works and processes of producing visual art forms.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach visual arts to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of visual arts in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of visual arts must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to G.

A.

A teacher of visual arts demonstrates an understanding of and how to teach aesthetic principles and habits and knows processes for evaluating them. The teacher must:

(1)

know how to make careful and clear distinctions to support factual claims from value and meaning claims;

(2)

know that learning about art involves questioning, making conclusions, and forming concepts of the nature of art to distinguish works of art from other objects;

(3)

understand that philosophers of art have reached quite different conclusions about what art is; and

(4)

know questioning strategies that lead to understanding the nature, relationship, and value of art.

B.

A teacher of visual arts understands and evaluates art theory and art studio practice. The teacher must:

(1)

understand and apply formal elements and principles of design;

(2)

understand and apply theories of color, spatial relationships, and perception;

(3)

know ways for developing ideas for artistic metaphors derived from exploration of the physical world, the needs of other people, psychological interests, and reflecting on sensory and formal qualities;

(4)

be able to make technical and aesthetic decisions and modify ideas as work proceeds;

(5)

develop skills in manipulating two-dimensional and three-dimensional art materials and explore a variety of methods and effects;

(6)

know the various standards to consider in determining whether a work is finished or successful;

(7)

be able to apply various artistic standards in judging personal works of art;

(8)

know how to alternate between invention, the role of artist, and selection, the role of critic;

(9)

understand the sustained personal effort and the pleasure and satisfaction of producing a work of art; and

(10)

demonstrate competence in a minimum of one medium or process in each of the following six studio art areas, with an emphasis in at least two areas:

(a)

drawing, including experiences in rendering, gesture, and contour;

(b)

painting, for example, experiences with water color, tempera, oil, acrylic, or mixed media;

(c)

sculpture, for example, experiences with wood, metal, fibers, paper mache, molding, casting, or found objects; ceramics, for example, experiences with glazing, hand building, throwing, and firing; or architecture, for example, experiences with model making, rendering, and computer imaging;

(d)

graphic arts; photography, for example, experiences with still, black and white, film processing, and digital imaging; or printmaking, for example, experiences with silk screening, monoprinting, relief printing, stenciling, serigraphy, engraving, or intaglio;

(e)

fiber arts, for example, experiences with weaving, papermaking, quilting, or stitchery; and

(f)

computer graphics, video and animation, performance art, or conceptual art.

C.

A teacher of visual arts understands that works of art are affected by where and when they were produced. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the effect of culture and temporal contexts on the appearance of artworks and the point of view of persons of other cultures or other times in interpreting the art;

(2)

analyze and interpret contextual information about traditional art forms within various cultures;

(3)

understand the chronological development of art from prehistoric to present; and

(4)

use art historical research processes.

D.

A visual arts teacher understands, produces, and evaluates critical interpretations of works of art. The teacher must:

(1)

understand that art critics base their judgment of artworks on specific standards, interpret how artworks function in society, and select appropriate standards for judging artworks;

(2)

know how to apply a variety of critical perspectives in interpreting works by investigating significant meaning and expressive content of the works, to synthesize description and analysis into an interpretive judgment; and

(3)

know how to use criticism models to compare and contrast qualities within artwork using the sensory, formal, technical, and expressive scanning model and the description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment strategies model.

E.

A teacher of visual arts understands central concepts common to the teaching and learning of art education content. The teacher must understand:

(1)

philosophical influences within art education;

(2)

the goals and purposes of art education, making principled decisions about practice;

(3)

the historical foundations of art education and training in visual art;

(4)

art education research to enhance teaching effectiveness;

(5)

the importance of the arts to the individual, school, community, and society to include careers, hobbies, and leisure time activities;

(6)

how to budget an art program and manage art classroom procedures;

(7)

how to conduct meaningful and appropriate assessments and evaluations of programs; and

(8)

safe use of tools, equipment, materials, and processes in visual art education learning environments.

F.

A teacher of visual arts must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of visual arts that integrates understanding of visual art with an understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of visual arts to children, preadolescents, and adolescents must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of visual arts and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

G.

A teacher of visual arts must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(1)

the relationships between and among print and digital content processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(2)

the role and rationale in using literature and other texts including electronic texts and nonprint materials across the curriculum.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach visual arts must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017