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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

CHAPTER 8710, TEACHER AND OTHER SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL LICENSING

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR LICENSING AND STANDARDS BOARD

Table of Parts
Part Title
8710.0100 SCOPE.
REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES
8710.0200 FEES.
8710.0300 Repealed by subpart
8710.0310 DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL RULES FOR TEACHING LICENSES.
8710.0311 TIER 1 LICENSE.
8710.0312 TIER 2 LICENSE.
8710.0313 TIER 3 LICENSE.
8710.0314 TIER 4 LICENSE.
8710.0320 OUT-OF-FIELD PERMISSION.
8710.0321 INNOVATIVE PROGRAM PERMISSION.
8710.0325 SHORT-CALL SUBSTITUTE LICENSE.
8710.0326 LIFETIME SUBSTITUTE LICENSE.
8710.0330 TEACHER LICENSURE VIA PORTFOLIO APPLICATION.
8710.0350 [Repealed, 25 SR 805]
8710.0400 APPLICANTS PREPARED OUTSIDE MINNESOTA.
8710.0500 EXAMINATIONS FOR TEACHER LICENSES.
8710.0550 ADDITIONAL FIELDS OF LICENSURE.
8710.0600 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
8710.0700 PROCEDURES FOR VOLUNTARY SURRENDER OF LICENSES.
8710.0800 PROCEDURES FOR REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION OF ALL LICENSES.
8710.0850 ISSUANCE OR REINSTATEMENT OF LICENSE AFTER REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION.
8710.0900 APPEAL TO PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR LICENSING AND STANDARDS BOARD.
8710.1000 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
8710.1050 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
8710.1100 [Repealed, 25 SR 805]
8710.1200 [Repealed, 25 SR 805]
8710.1250 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
8710.1300 [Repealed, 25 SR 805]
8710.1400 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
8710.1410 [Repealed, 43 SR 463]
TEACHER STANDARDS
8710.2000 STANDARDS OF EFFECTIVE PRACTICE FOR TEACHERS.
8710.2100 CODE OF ETHICS FOR MINNESOTA TEACHERS.
8710.3000 TEACHERS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.
8710.3100 TEACHERS OF PARENT AND FAMILY EDUCATION.
8710.3200 TEACHERS OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.
8710.3300 [Repealed, 34 SR 595]
8710.3310 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF COMMUNICATION ARTS AND LITERATURE.
8710.3320 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS.
8710.3330 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF SOCIAL STUDIES.
8710.3340 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF GENERAL SCIENCE.
8710.3350 PREPRIMARY ENDORSEMENT LICENSE.
8710.3360 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 8 WORLD LANGUAGE AND CULTURE ENDORSEMENT LICENSE.
8710.4000 TEACHERS OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION.
8710.4050 TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
8710.4100 TEACHERS OF AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGE, HISTORY, AND CULTURE.
8710.4150 TEACHERS OF BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION.
8710.4200 TEACHERS OF BUSINESS.
8710.4250 TEACHERS OF COMMUNICATION ARTS AND LITERATURE.
8710.4300 TEACHERS OF DANCE AND THEATRE ARTS.
8710.4310 TEACHERS OF DANCE.
8710.4320 TEACHERS OF THEATRE ARTS.
8710.4350 TEACHERS OF DRIVER AND TRAFFIC SAFETY.
8710.4400 TEACHERS OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE.
8710.4450 TEACHERS OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES.
8710.4500 TEACHERS OF HEALTH.
8710.4525 TEACHERS OF COMPUTER, KEYBOARDING, AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS.
8710.4550 LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALISTS.
8710.4600 TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS.
8710.4650 TEACHERS OF VOCAL MUSIC AND OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC.
8710.4700 TEACHERS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
8710.4725 TEACHERS OF READING.
8710.4750 TEACHERS OF SCIENCE.
8710.4770 TEACHERS OF SCIENCE ENDORSEMENT LICENSURE BY EXAMINATION.
8710.4800 TEACHERS OF SOCIAL STUDIES.
8710.4825 TEACHER COORDINATORS OF WORK-BASED LEARNING.
8710.4850 TEACHERS OF TECHNOLOGY.
8710.4900 TEACHERS OF VISUAL ARTS.
8710.4925 READING LEADER.
8710.4950 TEACHERS OF WORLD LANGUAGES AND CULTURES.
8710.5000 CORE SKILLS FOR TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION.
8710.5050 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: ACADEMIC AND BEHAVIORAL STRATEGIST.
8710.5100 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: BLIND OR VISUALLY IMPAIRED.
8710.5200 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING.
8710.5250 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: ORAL/AURAL DEAF EDUCATION.
8710.5300 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: DEVELOPMENTAL ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
8710.5400 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.
8710.5500 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD.
8710.5600 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: EMOTIONAL OR BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS.
8710.5700 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: LEARNING DISABILITIES.
8710.5800 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: PHYSICAL AND HEALTH DISABILITIES.
8710.5850 TEACHERS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION: AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS.
OTHER SCHOOL PROFESSIONALS
8710.5900 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ACCOMMODATION SPECIALIST FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES.
8710.6000 SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST.
8710.6100 SCHOOL NURSE.
8710.6200 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST.
8710.6300 SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER.
8710.6400 SCHOOL COUNSELOR.
CONTINUING EDUCATION AND LICENSE RENEWAL
8710.7000 DUTY OF LICENSEE TO RENEW.
8710.7100 RENEWAL OF TIER 3 OR 4 TEACHING LICENSES.
8710.7200 CLOCK HOURS; REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWAL OF PROFESSIONAL LICENSES.
8710.7300 LOCAL COMMITTEES FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND RELICENSURE.
8710.7400 LOCAL COMMITTEES IN NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS.
8710.7500 LOCAL COMMITTEE OF COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY.
8710.7600 RIGHT OF APPEAL.
8710.7700 REVIEW OF LOCAL COMMITTEE FUNCTIONS.
TEACHERS OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
8710.8000 CORE SKILLS FOR TEACHERS OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
8710.8010 TEACHERS OF COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY CAREERS.
8710.8020 TEACHERS OF CONSTRUCTION CAREERS.
8710.8030 TEACHERS OF MANUFACTURING CAREERS.
8710.8040 TEACHERS OF MEDICAL CAREERS.
8710.8050 TEACHER OF CREATIVE DESIGN CAREERS.
8710.8060 TEACHER OF EARLY CHILDHOOD CAREERS.
8710.8070 TEACHER OF HOSPITALITY SERVICE CAREERS.
8710.8080 TEACHERS OF TRANSPORTATION CAREERS.
8710.9000 VOLUNTARY CREDENTIAL FOR EDUCATION PARAPROFESSIONALS.
8710.9010 CAREER PATHWAYS TEACHER.

8710.0100 SCOPE.

This chapter governs the procedures for licensure and the educational requirements for instructional and support personnel who are required to be licensed by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. A person required to hold a license shall meet the requirements in this chapter for each licensure field in which the person practices.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.185

History:

15 SR 2267; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES

8710.0200 FEES.

Each application for the issuance or renewal of a license to teach shall be accompanied by a processing fee in compliance with the fee authorized by the legislature. The fees shall be paid to the commissioner of education who shall deposit them with the commissioner of management and budget, as provided by law, and report each month to the commissioner of management and budget the amount of fees collected.

The fee shall be nonrefundable for applicants not qualifying for a license, except the fee is refundable when the applicant for a license already holds the license for which application is made and that license does not expire in the year the application is submitted.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.08; 125.185; 214.06

History:

L 1995 1Sp3 art 16 s 13; 20 SR 2702; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; L 2003 c 112 art 2 s 50; L 2003 c 130 s 12; L 2009 c 101 art 2 s 109; 34 SR 595

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.0300

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 1a.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 2.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 2a.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 2b.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, 25 SR 805]

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 6.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 7.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 8.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 9.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 10.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Subp. 11.

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0310 DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL RULES FOR TEACHING LICENSES.

Subpart 1.

Definitions.

A.

For the purposes of parts 8710.0310 to 8710.0330, the terms in this subpart have the meanings given them.

B.

"Assignment" means the course or courses taught in a school for which students are granted credit.

C.

"Board" means the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board.

D.

"Cultural competency training" means a training program that promotes self-reflection and discussion including but not limited to all of the following topics: racial, cultural, and socioeconomic groups; American Indian and Alaskan native students; religion; systemic racism; gender identity, including transgender students; sexual orientation; language diversity; and individuals with disabilities and mental health concerns. Training programs must be designed to deepen teachers' understanding of their own frames of reference, the potential bias in these frames, and their impact on expectations for and relationships with students, students' families, and the school communities, consistent with part 8710.2000, subpart 4, and Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.30, subdivision 1, paragraph (q).

E.

"District" means a school district or a charter school.

F.

"Field-specific methods" means differentiated instructional strategies targeting content and pedagogy for a singular licensure area to enable student learning.

G.

"Good cause" means:

(1)

the applicant is unable to meet the requirements of a higher licensure tier due to a lack of a board-approved teacher preparation program in the licensure area;

(2)

the position is a full-time equivalency of 0.1 or less; or

(3)

the applicant demonstrates to the board barriers to reaching a higher licensure tier. Barriers may include but are not limited to financial burdens to obtaining a higher tiered license, inability to pass licensure exams, or lack of geographic proximity to teacher preparation.

H.

"Innovative program" means a school within a district that is either a state-approved area learning center or an alternative learning program or provides a school board resolution designating the school as an innovative program, including the reason for the designation.

I.

"Licensure area" or "licensure field" means the content taught for which standards have been adopted in Minnesota Rules.

J.

"Mentorship program" means a program that meets the following criteria:

(1)

a yearlong collaborative relationship with an experienced Tier 3 or 4 mentor teacher who is not currently on an improvement plan and voluntarily agrees to mentor the mentee teacher;

(2)

the mentor has access to resources or training, develops common expectations for the mentorship experience, and encourages the mentee to select areas for growth over the course of the year;

(3)

consists of sessions no less than once per month that focus on building a collaborative relationship with a focus on the exchange of knowledge, skills, and experiences, including the needs and questions of the mentee; and

(4)

the sessions include discussion of:

(a)

effective strategies to engage students;

(b)

classroom management strategies that reflect an understanding of the stages of child development;

(c)

the educational rights of students and their diverse needs and experiences;

(d)

school policies and practices, including appropriate boundaries and data privacy; and

(e)

how student learning data can be used to improve classroom planning and instruction.

K.

"Professional license from another state" means a professional teaching license issued by the responsible state agency of another state and required by the law of that state for an individual to teach in a public school, but does not include an emergency, temporary, or substitute teaching license.

L.

"Related services professional" means a teacher who holds a license issued by the board consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.06, subdivision 2, and who meets the requirements for a license issued pursuant to parts 8710.6000 to 8710.6400.

M.

"Student teaching" means a minimum of 12 weeks full time, or the equivalent, when an individual enrolled in a teacher preparation program assumes teacher responsibilities while working with a cooperating teacher who holds a Tier 3 or 4 license or a professional license from another state in the subject area and a provider supervisor to practice and demonstrate the necessary development of the individual's knowledge, skills, and dispositions to become a teacher. A student teaching experience includes observation, feedback, and evaluation from the cooperating teacher and provider supervisor.

N.

"Teacher of record" means an individual who is responsible for the planning, instruction, and assessment of students in a classroom and authorized to grant students credit for meeting standards attributed to the content taught, or is part of a co-teaching assignment and has shared responsibility for planning, instruction, and assessment of students in a classroom.

O.

"Teacher preparation program" means a program approved by the board or the state where the program resides that trains candidates in educational pedagogy and content-specific pedagogy for any subset of the scope of licensure for students from birth to 21 years of age.

P.

"Teaching license" or "teacher license" means a license that permits an individual to be a teacher of record. This includes Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3, and Tier 4 licenses issued under parts 8710.0311 to 8710.0314.

Subp. 2.

Teaching licenses, in general.

A.

Teaching licenses must be granted by the board to applicants who meet all requirements of applicable statutes and rules.

B.

An applicant must qualify separately for each licensure area for which an application is made.

C.

A license becomes valid on the date issued by the board and expires on June 30 of the expiration year. A Tier 1 or Tier 2 license, out-of-field permission, or innovative program permission can be used until September 1 after the date of expiration if the placement is in a summer school program at the district aligned to the license or is part of a year-round school at the district aligned to the licensure area.

D.

The board must request a criminal history background check be performed by the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.18, subdivision 8, upon an individual applying for a teaching license or substitute license for the first time. Upon renewal of a teaching license or substitute license, the board must perform a new background check on the license holder that includes a review for national arrests, charges, and convictions if a background check has not been completed on the license holder within the last five years.

E.

All applicants for licensure and license renewals are subject to a conduct review performed by the board. The board may refuse to issue a license or deny a license renewal based on the results of the conduct review. An applicant who is denied a license or license renewal as a result of the conduct review may appeal the board's decision pursuant to subpart 6.

Subp. 3.

Addition to a Tier 3 or 4 license.

When a licensure area is added to a Tier 3 or 4 license issued under parts 8710.0313 and 8710.0314, the expiration date is the date previously established for the Tier 3 or 4 license in effect.

Subp. 4.

Movement between tiers.

Teachers may apply to obtain a license in a higher licensure tier at any time after the requirements for the higher tier have been met. The teacher must be granted the license under a higher tier upon review and approval by the board pursuant to the rules established for the license sought.

Subp. 5.

Multiple expiration dates.

If a license holder has completed and verified the renewal requirements for a currently held Tier 3 or 4 license issued under parts 8710.0313 and 8710.0314, the license holder may renew a currently held Tier 3 or 4 license up to one year before the expiration date for the purpose of consolidating multiple expiration dates of any Tier 3 or 4 licenses held into one expiration date. The consolidation of multiple expiration dates must be consolidated within a single tier.

Subp. 6.

Appeal.

An applicant who is denied a teaching license by the board or who is issued a license under a different licensure tier than what was sought may appeal the board's decision under part 8710.0900 and Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14, and section 122A.188.

Subp. 7.

Licenses issued in error.

A license issued in error to a person who does not qualify for the license must be corrected without charge to the license holder, and the corrections must be made without a hearing under part 8710.0900 and Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14. A license issued in error is not valid.

Subp. 8.

Report.

The board must issue an annual report by September 1 that summarizes the previous fiscal year's Tier 1, 2, 3, and 4 licenses and out-of-field and innovative program permissions, organized by licensure field, race and ethnicity, and district.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0311 TIER 1 LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

If a district is unable to fill an open position with a teacher holding a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license, a Tier 1 license must be issued, consistent with this part, to an applicant who does not hold a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license on behalf of a district request except as provided in part 8710.0310, subpart 4. A Tier 1 license authorizes the license holder to teach within the requesting district and the specific licensure field in the application.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a Tier 1 license to an applicant upon request by the designated administrator of the hiring district. The applicant must initiate the application process and meet the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The applicant must:

(1)

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

(2)

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service; or

(3)

for applicants in career and technical education fields and career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(a)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the assignment;

(b)

an associate's degree aligned to the assignment; or

(c)

a professional certification aligned to the assignment from an approved certifying organization.

B.

The hiring district must show:

(1)

the position was posted for at least 15 days on the board-approved statewide job board; and

(2)

a Tier 1 license for this applicant is warranted for this assignment because one of the following:

(a)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment applied for the position;

(b)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment accepted the position; or

(c)

for each individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license that may have accepted the assignment, the individual was unacceptable for the assignment because one or more of the following:

i.

the individual was not fluent in the language required for the assignment;

ii.

the individual was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

iii.

the individual had disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

iv.

the individual was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

v.

the individual had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the individual, including in the applying district.

C.

The hiring district must affirm the applicant:

(1)

will participate in a mentorship program;

(2)

will participate in an evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation; and

(3)

has the necessary skills and knowledge to teach in the content field aligned to the assignment.

D.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

A Tier 1 license is valid for up to one year and expires on June 30 of the expiration year. A Tier 1 license may be used until September 1 after the date of expiration if the placement is in a summer school program at the district aligned to the license or is part of a year-round school at the district aligned to the licensure area.

Subp. 4.

First renewal.

To renew a Tier 1 license for the first time, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the hiring district must meet the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The hiring district must show that the position was posted for at least 60 days on the board-approved statewide job board. If an applicant accepts the position but later turns it down, the hiring district must repost the position for 15 days.

B.

The hiring district must show one of the following:

(1)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment applied for the position;

(2)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment accepted the position; or

(3)

for each individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license that may have accepted the assignment, the individual was unacceptable for the assignment because one or more of the following:

(a)

the individual was not fluent in the language required for the assignment;

(b)

the individual was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

(c)

the individual had disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

(d)

the individual was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

(e)

the individual had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the individual, including in the applying district.

C.

The applicant must show the applicant attempted the board-approved content examination aligned to the assignment, if applicable, during the academic year in which the applicant held a Tier 1 license. Any licensure area that does not have a board-approved content examination is exempt from this requirement.

D.

The hiring district must show the applicant participated in:

(1)

cultural competency training;

(2)

a mentorship program; and

(3)

an evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

E.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 5.

Second and third renewals.

To renew a Tier 1 license for the second or third time, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the hiring district must meet the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The hiring district must show that the position was posted for at least 60 days on the board-approved statewide job board. If an applicant accepts the position but later turns it down, the hiring district must repost the position for 15 days.

B.

The hiring district must show one of the following:

(1)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment applied for the position;

(2)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment accepted the position; or

(3)

for each individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license that may have accepted the assignment, the individual was unacceptable for the assignment because one or more of the following:

(a)

the individual was not fluent in the language required for the assignment;

(b)

the individual was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

(c)

the individual had disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

(d)

the individual was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

(e)

the individual had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the individual, including in the applying district.

C.

The hiring district must show the applicant participated in:

(1)

a mentorship program; and

(2)

an evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

D.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 6.

Additional renewals.

To renew a Tier 1 license more than three times, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the hiring district must meet the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The hiring district must show that the position was posted for at least 60 days on the board-approved statewide job board. If an applicant accepts the position but later turns it down, the hiring district must repost the position for 15 days.

B.

The hiring district must show one of the following:

(1)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment applied for the position;

(2)

no individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the assignment accepted the position; or

(3)

for each individual who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license that may have accepted the assignment, the individual was unacceptable for the assignment because one or more of the following:

(a)

the individual was not fluent in the language required for the assignment;

(b)

the individual was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

(c)

the individual had disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

(d)

the individual was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

(e)

the individual had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the individual, including in the applying district.

C.

The hiring district must show one of the following:

(1)

the Tier 1 teacher is teaching in a career and technical education field or career pathway course of study; or

(2)

the Tier 1 teacher is teaching in a licensure area, including licensure field shortages, economic development region shortages, and regions where there is a shortage of licensed teachers who reflect the racial or ethnic diversity of students in the region as identified in the biennial supply and demand report under Minnesota Statutes, section 127A.05, subdivision 6.

If the hiring district cannot meet the requirements of item C, the district must provide within the renewal application good cause justification for why the applicant should receive additional Tier 1 renewals pursuant to part 8710.0310, subpart 1, item G. The renewal application is reviewed pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 3. The board must issue or deny the renewal no later than 60 days after receiving the renewal application.

D.

The hiring district must show the applicant participated in:

(1)

a mentorship program; and

(2)

an evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

E.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet the board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 7.

Position change.

If a Tier 1 license holder moves to another licensure area within a district or to another district, prior to the expiration of the Tier 1 license, the license holder must initiate a new application, including paying the application fee, and the hiring district must meet the requirements under subpart 2 for the new position. The applicant is not required to complete a new background check by the board. The Tier 1 license issued by the board under this subpart is considered a new license, not a renewal under subparts 4 to 6.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0312 TIER 2 LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

A Tier 2 license must be issued, consistent with this part, to an applicant on behalf of a district request. A Tier 2 license authorizes the license holder to teach within the requesting district and the specific licensure field in the application.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a Tier 2 license to an applicant upon request by the designated administrator of the hiring district. The applicant must initiate the application process and must meet the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The applicant must:

(1)

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

(2)

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service; or

(3)

for applicants in career and technical education fields and career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(a)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the assignment;

(b)

an associate's degree aligned to the assignment; or

(c)

a professional certification aligned to the assignment from an approved certifying organization.

B.

The applicant must:

(1)

be enrolled in a board-approved teacher preparation program aligned to the licensure field;

(2)

hold a master's degree, or equivalent, aligned to the assignment from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript; or

(3)

show completion of two of the following:

(a)

at least eight upper division or graduate-level credits aligned to the assignment;

(b)

field-specific methods in a state-approved teacher preparation program aligned to the assignment;

(c)

at least two years of experience teaching as the teacher of record aligned to the assignment;

(d)

board-adopted pedagogy and content examinations with passing scores aligned to the licensure area. Any licensure area that does not have a board-approved content examination is exempt from the content examination requirement; or

(e)

a state-approved teacher preparation program aligned to the licensure area.

C.

The hiring district must affirm the applicant will participate in mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

A Tier 2 license is valid for up to two years and expires on June 30 of the expiration year. A Tier 2 license may be used until September 1 after the date of expiration if the placement is in a summer school program at the district aligned to the license or is part of a year-round school at the district aligned to the licensure area.

Subp. 4.

First renewal.

To renew a Tier 2 license for the first time, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the requirements of this subpart must be met.

A.

The hiring district must show the applicant participated in:

(1)

cultural competency training; and

(2)

mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

B.

If the applicant holds a Tier 2 license while enrolled in a board-approved teacher preparation program, the provider must certify that meaningful progress, as defined by the provider, has been made toward completion of the program. If no meaningful progress has been made, the board must deem the applicant not to be enrolled in a teacher preparation program unless the applicant provides justification to the board for failing to make meaningful progress.

Subp. 5.

Second and third renewals.

To renew a Tier 2 license for the second or third time, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the requirements of this subpart must be met.

A.

If the applicant holds a Tier 2 license while enrolled in a board-approved teacher preparation program, the provider must certify that meaningful progress, as defined by the provider, has been made toward completion of the program. If no meaningful progress has been made, the board must deem the applicant not to be enrolled in a teacher preparation program unless the applicant provides justification to the board for failing to make meaningful progress.

B.

The hiring district must show the applicant participated in mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

Subp. 6.

Additional renewals.

To renew a Tier 2 license more than three times, the applicant must initiate the renewal application process, and the requirements of this subpart must be met. The hiring district must show:

A.

the applicant participated in mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation; and

B.

within the renewal application good cause justification for why the applicant should receive additional Tier 2 renewals pursuant to part 8710.0310, subpart 1, item G. The renewal application is reviewed pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.182, subdivision 3. The board must issue or deny the renewal no later than 60 days after receiving the renewal application.

Subp. 7.

Position change.

If a Tier 2 license holder moves to another licensure area within a district or to another district, prior to the expiration of the Tier 2 license, the license holder must initiate a new application, including paying the application fee, and the hiring district must meet the requirements under subpart 2 for the new position. The applicant is not required to complete a new background check by the board. The Tier 2 license issued by the board under this subpart is considered a new license, not a renewal under subparts 4 to 6.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0313 TIER 3 LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

A Tier 3 license must be issued to an applicant, consistent with this part, aligned to the scope and field of the applicant's training and experience. A Tier 3 license authorizes the license holder to teach within the specific licensure field for which board rules exist.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a Tier 3 license if the applicant meets all of the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The applicant must:

(1)

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

(2)

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service; or

(3)

for applicants in career and technical education fields and career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(a)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the licensure area sought;

(b)

an associate's degree aligned to the licensure area sought; or

(c)

a professional certification aligned to the licensure area sought from an approved certifying organization.

B.

The applicant must obtain passing scores on the board-approved pedagogy and content examinations aligned to the licensure area sought. Any licensure area that does not have a board-approved content examination is exempt from the content examination requirement.

C.

The applicant must show one of the following:

(1)

completion of a board-approved teacher preparation program aligned to the licensure area sought. The board must accept certifications for related services professionals under parts 8710.6000 to 8710.6400 in lieu of completion of a board-approved teacher preparation program;

(2)

completion of a preparation program approved in another state aligned to the licensure area sought that included field-specific student teaching equivalent to field-specific student teaching in Minnesota-approved teacher preparation programs. The applicant is exempt from field-specific student teaching if the applicant has at least two years of field-specific experience teaching as the teacher of record in the licensure area sought;

(3)

recommendation for licensure via portfolio application aligned to the licensure area sought;

(4)

holds or held a professional license from another state in good standing aligned to the licensure area sought with at least two years of experience teaching as the teacher of record aligned to the licensure area sought; or

(5)

has at least three years of experience teaching as the teacher of record aligned to the licensure area sought under a Tier 2 license and presents evidence of summative teacher evaluations that did not result in placing or otherwise keeping the teacher on an improvement process aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation plan.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

A Tier 3 license is valid for up to three years and expires on June 30 of the expiration year.

Subp. 4.

Renewal.

A Tier 3 license may be renewed an unlimited number of times. To renew a Tier 3 license, the applicant must complete:

A.

mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5; and

B.

board-approved licensure renewal requirements, including obtaining approval from the applicant's local continuing education/relicensure committee, under parts 8710.7100 and 8710.7200 and Minnesota Statutes, section, 122A.187, subdivision 3.

Subp. 5.

Restrictions.

A.

An applicant whose content training or experience does not align to a currently approved Minnesota license, but for which past rules have been adopted, and who meets all other requirements of subpart 2, must be issued a Tier 3 license restricted to the scope and licensure area of the applicant's content training or experience.

B.

Applicants with content training and experience within two grade levels of a currently approved Minnesota licensure scope must be granted the full scope of the Minnesota license.

C.

Applicants who meet the requirements of subpart 2, items A and B, from a Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education accredited training center must be issued a Tier 3 license restricted to a Montessori setting and aligned to the scope of training.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0314 TIER 4 LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

A Tier 4 license authorizes the license holder, consistent with this part, to teach in the field and scope aligned to the license holder's preparation. A Tier 4 license indicates the license holder has had at least three years of experience in Minnesota within the field and scope of licensure and completed the professional development requirements mandated by statute.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a Tier 4 license if the applicant meets all of the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The applicant must:

(1)

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

(2)

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service; or

(3)

for applicants in career and technical education fields and career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(a)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the licensure area sought;

(b)

an associate's degree aligned to the licensure area sought; or

(c)

a professional certification aligned to the licensure area sought from an approved certifying organization.

B.

The applicant must have completed one of the following:

(1)

a board-approved teacher preparation program aligned to the licensure area sought. The board must accept certifications for related services professionals under parts 8710.6000 to 8710.6400 in lieu of completion of a board-approved teacher preparation program; or

(2)

a preparation program approved in another state aligned to the licensure area sought that included field-specific student teaching equivalent to field-specific student teaching in Minnesota-approved teacher preparation programs. The applicant is exempt from field-specific student teaching if the applicant has at least two years of field-specific experience teaching as the teacher of record.

C.

The applicant must obtain passing scores on the board-approved skills, pedagogy, and content examinations aligned to the licensure area sought. Any licensure area that does not have a board-approved content examination is exempt from the content examination requirement.

D.

The applicant must have at least three years of experience teaching in Minnesota as the teacher of record.

E.

The applicant's most recent summative evaluation must not have resulted in placing or otherwise keeping the teacher in an improvement process aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation plan.

F.

The applicant must have participated in mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, or if the statutory models are not practicable, to another identified district-aligned evaluation.

Subp. 3.

Adding a Tier 4 license.

To add an additional Tier 4 license, the applicant must show evidence of meeting the requirements of subpart 2, item C, and part 8710.0313, subpart 2, item C, subitem (1), (2), or (3), in the licensure area sought. An applicant may add a teachers of science endorsement by meeting the requirements of part 8710.4770.

Subp. 4.

Duration.

A Tier 4 license is valid for up to five years and expires on June 30 of the expiration year.

Subp. 5.

Renewal.

A Tier 4 license may be renewed an unlimited number of times. To renew a Tier 4 license, the applicant must complete:

A.

mentorship and evaluation aligned to the district's teacher development and evaluation model under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5; and

B.

board-approved licensure renewal requirements, including obtaining approval from the applicant's local continuing education/relicensure committee, under parts 8710.7100 and 8710.7200 and Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.187, subdivision 3.

Subp. 6.

Restrictions.

A.

An applicant whose content training or experience does not align to a currently approved Minnesota license, but for which past rules have been adopted, and who meets all other requirements of this part must be issued a Tier 4 license restricted to the scope and licensure area of the applicant's content training or experience.

B.

Applicants with content training and experience within two grade levels of a currently approved Minnesota licensure scope must be granted the full scope of the Minnesota license.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0320 OUT-OF-FIELD PERMISSION.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

An out-of-field permission authorizes a teacher holding a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license, consistent with this part, to teach in a field not aligned with the license held.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

A.

The board must issue an out-of-field permission upon request by the designated administrator of the hiring district. The applicant must initiate the application process, and the hiring district must show:

(1)

the applicant holds a valid Tier 2, 3, or 4 license;

(2)

the applicant holds a license other than for a related services professional under parts 8710.6000 to 8710.6400;

(3)

the applicant holds a bachelor's degree to receive an out-of-field permission for any license under parts 8710.3000 to 8710.5850;

(4)

the applicant approves the request; and

(5)

the position was posted for at least 15 days on the board-approved statewide job board.

B.

The district must show one of the following:

(1)

the licensed applicant is an internal hire with one or more years of employment within the district;

(2)

the applicant has additional qualifications that align with the requirements of the position; or

(3)

one of the following:

(a)

no teachers who hold a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment applied for the position;

(b)

no teachers who hold a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment accepted the position; or

(c)

for each teacher who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment that may have accepted the position, one of the following:

i.

the applicant is not fluent in the language required for the position;

ii.

the applicant was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

iii.

the applicant had a disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

iv.

the applicant was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

v.

the applicant had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the applicant, including in the applying district.

C.

An applicant who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in career and technical education or career pathways fields without a baccalaureate degree may obtain an out-of-field permission for another career and technical education or career pathways field.

D.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

An out-of-field permission is valid for up to one year and expires on June 30 of the expiration year.

Subp. 4.

Renewal.

An out-of-field permission may be renewed four times. To renew an out-of-field permission, the applicant must initiate the application process, and the hiring district must show:

A.

the applicant approves the request;

B.

the position was posted for at least 60 days on the board-approved statewide job board. If an applicant accepts the position but later turns it down, the hiring district must repost the position for 15 days; and

C.

one of the following:

(1)

the licensed applicant is an internal hire with one or more years of employment within the district;

(2)

the applicant has additional qualifications that align with the requirements of the position; or

(3)

one of the following:

(a)

no teachers who hold a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment applied for the position;

(b)

no teachers who hold a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment accepted the position; or

(c)

for each teacher who holds a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license in the assignment that may have accepted the position, one of the following:

i.

the applicant is not fluent in the language required for the position;

ii.

the applicant was unwilling to abide by or unable to apply the pedagogical model of the district or school;

iii.

the applicant had a disciplinary action with the board or final disciplinary action in a district;

iv.

the applicant was unwilling to abide by culturally responsive teaching principles; or

v.

the applicant had references that indicated an unwillingness or ineligibility to rehire the applicant, including in the applying district.

D.

A committee of board staff designated by the board must review applications that meet board criteria to fill an emergency position under this subpart. An emergency position is any position opened due to exigent circumstances, including but not limited to an unexpected resignation, leave of absence, or death of a position holder, in which the position starts within five days of the emergency request; the district has no reasonable alternative to fill the position; the applicant meets the professional qualifications for a Tier 1 license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 2; and the district has completed a background check pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.03, subdivision 1. If all criteria for an emergency position are met, the committee must issue an interim permission within three business days of receipt of the request that expires upon any of the following, whichever occurs first:

(1)

the district hires a Tier 2, 3, or 4 licensed teacher;

(2)

the applicant is issued a short-call substitute license;

(3)

the district submits a completed Tier 1 application that is denied or accepted by the board; or

(4)

30 days after issuance.

Subp. 5.

Additional renewals.

To renew an out-of-field permission more than four times, the hiring district must provide within the renewal application good cause justification for why the applicant should receive additional out-of-field permission renewals pursuant to part 8710.0310, subpart 1, item G. The renewal application is reviewed pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.181, subdivision 3. The board must issue or deny the renewal no later than 60 days after receiving the renewal application.

Subp. 6.

Limitations and exceptions.

A.

An individual cannot hold an out-of-field permission to work in a related services position.

B.

An out-of-field permission is limited to the licensure area and the district for which it was granted.

C.

An out-of-field permission granted for a summer school only position may be renewed an unlimited number of times.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0321 INNOVATIVE PROGRAM PERMISSION.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

An innovative program permission authorizes a licensed teacher, consistent with this part, to teach multiple fields within an established innovative program.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue an innovative program permission upon request by the designated administrator of the hiring district. The applicant must initiate the application process, and the hiring district must show:

A.

the applicant holds a bachelor's degree and a Tier 3 or 4 license other than for a related services professional; and

B.

the teaching assignment is within an innovative program.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

An innovative program permission is valid for up to one year and expires on June 30 of the expiration year.

Subp. 4.

Renewal.

An innovative program permission may be renewed an unlimited number of times.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0325 SHORT-CALL SUBSTITUTE LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

A short-call substitute license authorizes the license holder to replace the same teacher of record for no more than 15 consecutive school days.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a short-call substitute license to an applicant who meets the requirements of this subpart. The applicant must:

A.

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

B.

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service;

C.

for applicants in career and technical education fields and career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(1)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the assignment;

(2)

an associate's degree aligned to the assignment; or

(3)

a professional certification aligned to the assignment from an approved certifying organization; or

D.

be enrolled in and making meaningful progress, as defined by the provider, in a board-approved teacher preparation program and have successfully completed student teaching to be employed as a short-call substitute teacher.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

A short-call substitute license is valid for up to three years and expires on June 30 of the expiration year.

Subp. 4.

Renewal.

An applicant must reapply for a short-call substitute license upon its expiration.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0326 LIFETIME SUBSTITUTE LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

A lifetime substitute license is issued, consistent with this part, to a retired teacher and authorizes the license holder to replace a teacher of record who is on an approved leave of absence.

Subp. 2.

Requirements.

The board must issue a lifetime substitute license to an applicant who meets one of the following:

A.

holds or held a Tier 3 or 4 license, a Minnesota five-year standard license or its equivalent, or a professional license from another state and receives a retirement annuity as a result of the person's teaching experience; or

B.

holds or held a Tier 3 or 4 license or a Minnesota five-year standard license or its equivalent, taught for at least three years in an accredited nonpublic school in Minnesota, and receives a retirement annuity as a result of the person's teaching experience.

Subp. 3.

Duration.

A lifetime substitute license does not expire.

Subp. 4.

Limitations.

A teacher holding a lifetime substitute license may replace the same teacher of record on an approved leave of absence for more than 15 consecutive school days if the substitute teacher's previous Tier 3 or 4 license, Minnesota five-year standard license or its equivalent, or professional license from another state is aligned to the assignment.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0330 TEACHER LICENSURE VIA PORTFOLIO APPLICATION.

Subpart 1.

Purpose.

An applicant who has not completed teacher preparation or is unable to obtain a Tier 3 license through other requirements may apply for an initial Tier 3 license by submitting a pedagogy portfolio, content portfolio, and, if applicable, a core skills portfolio to the board to demonstrate the applicant has met the standards aligned to the licensure area sought. An applicant who has completed teacher preparation in one or more additional licensure areas may apply to add licensure areas to a current Tier 3 or 4 license by submitting a content portfolio and, if applicable, a core skills portfolio to the board to demonstrate the applicant has met the standards aligned to the additional licensure areas sought.

Subp. 2.

Portfolio review process.

A.

The applicant must initiate the application process by submitting a portfolio aligned to board-adopted submission guidelines.

B.

Applications for an initial Tier 3 license must include content, pedagogy, and core skills portfolios as follows:

(1)

a content portfolio that shows the content standards aligned to the licensure area sought is required for licenses sought under parts 8710.3000 to 8710.4950, 8710.5050 to 8710.5850, and 8710.8010 to 8710.8080;

(2)

a core skills in special education portfolio that shows the standards aligned to part 8710.5000 is required for licenses sought under parts 8710.5050 to 8710.5850;

(3)

a core skills in career and technical education portfolio that shows the standards aligned to part 8710.8000 is required for licenses sought under parts 8710.8010 to 8710.8080; and

(4)

a pedagogy portfolio that shows the applicant meets the standards of effective practice under part 8710.2000 is required for all licenses sought. A board-adopted passing score on a board-adopted teacher performance assessment aligned to the standards of effective practice under part 8710.2000 may be submitted in lieu of a pedagogy portfolio.

Evidence that provides the necessary information required under this item includes:

(a)

a transcript, syllabi of college coursework, or both;

(b)

subject-specific, high-quality professional development, as defined under the Every Student Succeeds Act;

(c)

professional contributions to the field, including presentations given to local and national education organizations, minutes of attendance in education-related task forces or state or national committees, articles published by local or national education publications, or other activities that demonstrate the applicant has met the standards of effective practice and content requirements;

(d)

a resume and letters of recommendation illustrating relevant work experience aligned to the licensure area sought;

(e)

classroom performance as determined by student growth on criterion-referenced assessments;

(f)

a rating of effective or higher on a teacher performance evaluation;

(g)

teacher performance assessment scores;

(h)

unedited video recordings of classroom instruction; or

(i)

observation and evaluation feedback through mentorship, teacher evaluation, student teaching, or other supervised classroom teaching experiences.

C.

Applications to add a licensure area to a current Tier 3 or 4 license must include a content portfolio that shows the applicant meets the content standards aligned to the licensure area sought under parts 8710.3000 to 8710.5850 and 8710.8000.

D.

A pedagogy portfolio must be reviewed by a panel of educators within 90 days of receiving a complete pedagogy portfolio and required fees. An applicant may present the contents of a submitted pedagogy portfolio in person to the panel on the set review date. An applicant may choose not to present the contents of the submitted pedagogy portfolio to the panel on the review date and thereby waives the right to defend the pedagogy portfolio material in person. To indicate knowledge of effective teaching dispositions under the Minnesota Code of Ethics for Teachers, the applicant must submit a completed evaluation by the individual responsible for the mentorship or supervision of the applicant for review by the panel of educators after completing one of the following:

(1)

a yearlong mentorship program aligned to board-adopted criteria; or

(2)

two years of experience teaching as the teacher of record in the licensure area sought.

E.

If the panel of educators under item D does not recommend an applicant for licensure via the pedagogy portfolio, the panel must provide specific information to the applicant on how to successfully demonstrate meeting any standard the panel determined was not met. The applicant may submit one revised pedagogy portfolio, which must be recommended for approval or disapproval by one member of the panel of educators within 60 days of receiving the revised submission.

F.

Each content portfolio must be reviewed by two reviewers who meet board-adopted qualifications within 90 days of receiving the completed portfolio and required fees.

G.

If the content reviewers under item F do not recommend the applicant for licensure via the content portfolio, the reviewers must provide specific information to the applicant on how to successfully demonstrate meeting any standard the reviewers determined was not met. The applicant may submit one revised content portfolio, which must be recommended for approval or disapproval by one of the content reviewers within 60 days of receiving the revised submission.

H.

An applicant who is recommended for licensure via portfolio review under this subpart must submit an application for licensure to the board that meets the requirements under subpart 3. The applicant must also pay an application fee.

Subp. 3.

Application requirements.

An applicant who is recommended for licensure via portfolio review under subpart 2 must submit an application for licensure to the board that meets the requirements of this subpart.

A.

The applicant must:

(1)

hold the minimum of a bachelor's degree from a college or university located in the United States that is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, as verified by a college transcript;

(2)

hold a credential from outside the United States that is equivalent to a bachelor's degree, as verified by a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services or other board-approved credential evaluation service; or

(3)

for applicants in career and technical education fields or career pathway courses of study, have one of the following:

(a)

five years of relevant work experience aligned to the licensure area sought;

(b)

an associate's degree aligned to the licensure area sought; or

(c)

a professional certification aligned to the licensure area sought from an approved certifying organization.

B.

The applicant must submit board-adopted passing scores on board-adopted content and pedagogy exams. Any licensure area that does not have a board-approved content examination is exempt from the content examination requirement.

C.

An applicant recommended for an initial Tier 3 license by the panel of educators under subpart 2, item D, and content reviewers under subpart 2, item F, must pass a criminal background check.

D.

An applicant recommended for the addition of a licensure area to a current Tier 3 or 4 license by the content reviewers under subpart 2, item F, must pass a criminal background check, if applicable.

Subp. 4.

CTE exceptions.

An applicant for any career and technical education field under parts 8710.8010 to 8710.8080 is exempt from the criteria in subpart 3 and may apply for an initial Tier 3 license under part 8710.0313 through portfolio review under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.18, subdivision 10, if the applicant completed parts 8710.2000 and 8710.8000, and meets one of the following requirements:

A.

has five years of relevant work experience aligned to the licensure area sought;

B.

holds an associate's degree aligned to the licensure area sought; or

C.

holds a professional certification aligned to the licensure area sought from an approved certifying organization.

Subp. 5.

Submission timelines.

A.

An applicant must submit a letter of intent to the board at least 30 days prior to submission of a portfolio application.

B.

A portfolio application prepared according to published guidelines must be submitted between 30 days and one year after the letter of intent is received by the board.

Subp. 6.

Appeal.

An applicant who is denied an initial Tier 3 license or an addition to a current Tier 3 or 4 license by the board under this part may appeal the board's decision under part 8710.0900 and Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0350

[Repealed, 25 SR 805]

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.0400 APPLICANTS PREPARED OUTSIDE MINNESOTA.

Subpart 1.

In general.

A license to teach in Minnesota shall be granted to an applicant who otherwise meets applicable statutory requirements and who completes programs leading to licensure in a teacher preparation institution located outside Minnesota. A license shall be granted only in licensure fields for which the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board has rules governing programs leading to licensure. A license shall be issued according to either subpart 2 or 3.

Subp. 2.

Applicants prepared in states with contracts with Minnesota.

An applicant who completes approved programs leading to licensure in teacher preparation institutions within states which have signed contracts with Minnesota according to the interstate agreement on qualification of educational personnel shall be granted a first Minnesota professional license. No license shall be issued on the basis of teaching experience only.

Subp. 3.

Applicants prepared in states without contracts with Minnesota.

An applicant who completes programs leading to licensure in teacher preparation institutions within states which have not signed contracts with Minnesota according to the interstate agreement on qualification of educational personnel shall be granted a first Minnesota professional license when the following criteria are met:

A.

the teacher preparation institution is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

the program leading to licensure has been recognized by the other state as qualifying the applicant completing the program for current licensure within that state;

C.

the program leading to licensure completed by the applicant is essentially equivalent in content to approved programs offered by Minnesota teacher preparation institutions according to Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board rules governing the licensure field and the grade level range of preparation is the same as, greater than, or not more than one year less than the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made;

D.

the teacher preparation institution which offers the program leading to licensure verifies that the applicant has completed an approved licensure program at that institution and recommends the applicant for a license in the licensure field and at the licensure level;

E.

the applicant has completed a program leading to licensure as verified by an official transcript issued by the institution recommending the applicant for licensure;

F.

the applicant has completed instruction in methods of teaching in the licensure field and at the licensure level of the program; and

G.

the applicant has completed student teaching or essentially equivalent experience.

Subp. 3a.

Applicants prepared outside United States.

An applicant who completes a licensure program from a college or university outside the United States shall be granted a first Minnesota professional license when the following criteria are met:

A.

the application packet includes a credential evaluation completed by a credential evaluator approved by the executive director of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board;

B.

the licensure program completed by the applicant is essentially equivalent in content to approved programs offered by Minnesota teacher preparation institutions according to Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board rules governing the licensure field and the grade level range of preparation is the same as, greater than, or not more than one year less than the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made;

C.

the applicant has completed instruction in methods of teaching in the licensure field and at the licensure level of the program; and

D.

the applicant has completed student teaching or essentially equivalent experience.

Subp. 4.

Exception for applicants who have not met part 8700.2700 or 8710.0500.

An applicant who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota, has met the criteria of subpart 3 or 3a, but has not completed the requirements of part 8700.2700 or 8710.0500, or both, shall be granted a Minnesota temporary limited license based upon the provisions of this part.

An applicant who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota, has met the criteria of subpart 3 or 3a with the exception of the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made, but has not completed the requirements of part 8700.2700 or 8710.0500, or both, shall be granted a Minnesota temporary limited license based upon the provisions of this part. The license shall be issued for the grade level range of preparation, not to exceed the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made.

If part 8710.0500 has not been met upon expiration of the temporary limited license, a person may renew the temporary limited license twice. Each renewal of the temporary limited license requires the applicant to submit an official score report verifying having taken the skills area examination during the period of each temporary limited license and evidence of participating in an approved remedial assistance program provided by a school district or postsecondary institution that includes a formal diagnostic component in the specific areas in which the licensee did not obtain qualifying scores during the period of each temporary limited license.

Upon meeting this part and parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, including preparation for the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field, a first professional license shall be granted.

Subp. 5.

Exception for elementary education applicants who have not met specialty requirements.

An applicant who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota that meets this part, but has not met the specialty requirements of part 8710.3200, subpart 4, for the license, shall be granted one of the following:

A.

a nonrenewable license, valid for teaching elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6, if the applicant has met the requirements of parts 8700.2700, 8710.0500, and 8710.3200 for teaching elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6, but has not met the requirements of part 8710.3200, subpart 4; or

B.

a temporary limited license, valid for teaching elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6, if the applicant has met the requirements of part 8710.3200 for teaching elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6, but has not met the requirements of part 8700.2700; 8710.0500; or 8710.3200, subpart 4.

A teacher issued a kindergarten through grade 6 nonrenewable license shall have two years from the expiration date of the first Minnesota license to complete the requirements for a specialty license required by part 8710.3200, subpart 4. A teacher issued a kindergarten through grade 6 temporary limited license may renew the license under subpart 4 if part 8710.0500 has not been met. No person may hold a nonrenewable license, a temporary limited license, or any combination of these licenses for more than three years. Upon meeting the requirements of this part and parts 8700.2700, 8710.0500, and 8710.3200, a first professional license shall be granted.

Subp. 6.

Exception for applicants who have not met licensure level requirements.

An applicant who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota that meets the requirements of this part, with the exception of the licensure level requirements of subpart 3, item C, or 3a, item B, shall be granted one of the following:

A.

a nonrenewable license, in the licensure field at the grade level range of preparation, not to exceed the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made, if the applicant has met parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500; or

B.

a temporary limited license, in the licensure field at the grade level range of preparation, not to exceed the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field for which application is made, if the applicant has met the requirements of this part, but has not met part 8700.2700 or 8710.0500.

A teacher issued a nonrenewable license shall have two years from the expiration date of the first Minnesota license to complete the requirements for teaching at the grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field. A teacher issued a temporary limited license may renew the license under subpart 4 if part 8710.0500 has not been met. No person may hold a nonrenewable license, a temporary limited license, or any combination of these licenses for more than three years. Upon meeting the requirements of this part and parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, and the licensure grade level range of the Minnesota licensure field, a first professional license shall be granted.

Subp. 7.

Exception for applicants who have not met licensure requirements in part 8710.4250, 8710.4300, 8710.4750, or 8710.4800.

An applicant for licensure as a teacher of communication arts and literature, a teacher of dance and theatre arts, a teacher of science, or a teacher of social studies who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota, who meets the requirements of this part with the exception of licensure level requirements of subpart 3, item C, or 3a, item B, shall be granted one of the following:

A.

a nonrenewable license, in the licensure field, which shall be restricted for teaching only in the field of major preparation, if the applicant has met the requirements of parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, but has not met the requirements of part 8710.4250, 8710.4300, 8710.4750, or 8710.4800; or

B.

a temporary limited license, in the licensure field, which shall be restricted for teaching only in the field of major preparation, if the applicant has not met the requirements of parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, and part 8710.4250, 8710.4300, 8710.4750, or 8710.4800.

A teacher issued a nonrenewable license shall have two years from the expiration date of the first Minnesota teaching license to complete the licensure requirements of part 8710.4250, 8710.4300, 8710.4750, or 8710.4800. A teacher issued a temporary limited license may renew the limited temporary license under subpart 4 if part 8710.0500 has not been met. No person may hold a nonrenewable license, a temporary limited license, or any combination of these licenses for more than three years. Upon meeting the requirements of this part, parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, and part 8710.4250, 8710.4300, 8710.4750, or 8710.4800, a first professional license in the licensure field shall be granted.

Subp. 8.

Exception for applicants who have completed alternative preparation programs.

An applicant who has completed a teacher licensure program outside Minnesota that meets the requirements of this part, with the exception of having completed the preparation program in a teacher preparation institution accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools, shall be granted a first professional license. To meet the requirements of subpart 3, item D, if the applicant is unable to secure a teacher preparation institution recommendation for licensure, the preparation program that offers the program leading to licensure must verify that the applicant has completed the approved licensure program and must recommend the applicant for a license in the licensure field and at the licensure level. To meet the requirements of subpart 3, item E, if an official transcript verifying completion of the licensure program is not available, the preparation program must provide official documentation of the program leading to licensure and must verify that the applicant has completed the approved licensure program.

If the applicant has not completed the requirements for a first professional license, a temporary limited license or a nonrenewable license may be issued upon meeting the requirements of subpart 4, 5, 6, or 7.

Subp. 9.

Exception for national board certified teachers.

An applicant who provides evidence of current national board certification, but has not completed the requirements of part 8700.2700 or 8710.0500, shall be granted a temporary limited license. If the requirements of part 8710.0500 have not been met upon expiration, the temporary limited license may be renewed under subpart 4. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall accept current national board certification in a licensure field for which the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board has established rules governing programs leading to licensure as evidence of having met the criteria of subpart 3, item C, or 3a, item B. If the applicant also provides evidence of current licensure from another state in the same field as national board certification is held, but at a different grade level designation, the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall accept evidence of licensure and certification together as having met the requirements of subpart 3, item C, or 3a, item B, provided this evidence includes all grade level designations of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board licensure rule. Upon meeting the requirements of parts 8700.2700 and 8710.0500, a first professional license based on this subpart shall be granted.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.06; 125.185

History:

11 SR 1793; 15 SR 2267; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0500 EXAMINATIONS FOR TEACHER LICENSES.

Subpart 1.

Examination requirements.

A.

An applicant for a first professional teaching license shall provide official evidence of having successfully completed examinations of skills in reading, writing, and mathematics before being issued an initial Minnesota professional teaching license. The examinations must have been adopted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. An applicant who is deaf must fulfill the mathematics requirement of this part by successfully completing the mathematics examination, and must fulfill the reading and writing requirements of this part either by successfully completing the reading and writing examinations or by evaluation by board approved colleges and universities of demonstrated proficiency (Intermediate Plus) in the expressive and receptive use of alternative communication systems including sign language and finger spelling as measured by the Sign Communication Proficiency Inventory (SCPI). This inventory is published by the National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester, New York, and is administered through the College of Education at the University of Minnesota on at least an annual basis. A description of this inventory is available through the Minitex interlibrary loan system in the Journal of Sign Language Studies and American Annals for the Deaf. The inventory is incorporated by reference. It may be periodically changed. An applicant who is blind shall be required to fulfill requirements of this part by successfully completing the examinations with an opportunity to select a reader, to use adaptive visual aids or technology aids, and to complete the testing under adaptive conditions.

B.

On or after September 1, 2001, an applicant for a first professional teaching license in any field shall provide evidence of having successfully completed an examination of general teaching knowledge and the examination required for the teaching field for which licensure is applied under this chapter. The examinations must have been adopted by the board. Teachers applying to add teaching fields to existing licenses must successfully complete the examination required for each teaching field to be added, but are not required to complete an examination of general teaching knowledge.

Subp. 2.

Selection and adoption.

The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall solicit proposals for the development, validation, and implementation of teacher examinations under subpart 1. The board shall select the proposal of a party whose understanding of the project, statement of work to be performed, management plan, staffing, and related experience demonstrate the ability to develop, validate, and implement a statewide examination system and to conduct subsequent administrations of the adopted examinations. The board shall adopt examinations that have been validated by another state or reputable national testing organization and field tested in Minnesota.

Subp. 3.

Requirement.

A.

An applicant must achieve a minimum passing score on each examination required under subpart 1. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall establish a minimum passing score for each examination based on validation for use in Minnesota.

B.

Notwithstanding item A, for applications submitted on or before August 31, 2002, examinations required under subpart 1, item B, shall have no minimum passing score. The board shall use test scores achieved by applicants on or before August 31, 2002, to establish minimum passing scores.

Subp. 4.

Notification.

Minimum passing scores applicants must achieve on the examinations and the identification of the examinations adopted shall be published in the State Register within 60 days of adoption by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. Before July 2 of each calendar year, the board shall notify the colleges and universities approved by the board to prepare candidates for teacher licensure of the minimum passing score applicants must achieve on the examinations and which examinations are adopted under subpart 2.

Subp. 5.

Licensure recommendation.

In recommending candidates for licensure, Minnesota colleges and universities shall attest that license requirements have been met, including successful completion of all examinations required under this part.

Subp. 6.

Administration, scoring, and reporting.

Administration, scoring, and reporting of examinations shall be conducted by the party whose examinations have been adopted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. Applicants may take the examinations on any of the dates that are established by the party for national administration or on dates established by the board for special administration. Examinations shall be administered at least four times a year in Minnesota. It is the responsibility of the applicant to be informed about the dates and locations of the examinations and to apply for the appropriate examinations. Registration procedures are governed by the party whose examinations have been adopted. Examinees shall authorize the forwarding of their scores to the institutions they attend and to the board. The scores as forwarded are the official evidence required in this part.

Subp. 7.

Fees.

Candidates for licenses shall pay the examination fee approved by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board for the examinations they take.

Subp. 8.

Admission to upper division or graduate coursework.

Candidates for an initial license shall provide official evidence to the institutions they attend of having taken the examinations adopted under subpart 1, item A, before enrolling in upper division coursework in the professional education sequence. Candidates for an initial license who have a baccalaureate degree shall provide official evidence to the institutions they attend of having taken the examinations adopted under subpart 1, item A, before enrolling in coursework in the professional education sequence. Candidates who fail to achieve the minimum passing score on one or more of the examinations may enroll in upper division or graduate coursework in the professional education sequence; however, candidates must achieve the passing scores established under subpart 3 before recommendation for a first professional teaching license. Colleges and universities must provide candidates who fail the examinations access to opportunities to enhance their skills.

Subp. 9.

[Repealed, 25 SR 877]

Subp. 10.

Retesting procedures.

Examinees who fail to achieve at least the minimum score on one or more of the examinations are permitted to retake the examination or examinations for which the minimum score was not achieved under this part. No minimum waiting time is required.

Subp. 11.

Applicants prepared outside Minnesota.

Applicants for Minnesota licensure who complete teacher preparation outside Minnesota but who have not met the requirements under subpart 1 and who otherwise meet the applicable statutes and rules shall be granted no more than three one-year temporary licenses. An applicant who has not achieved a minimum passing score on the examinations required under subpart 1, may renew a temporary license under this subpart if the applicant provides evidence of having taken all required examinations under subpart 1 and having enrolled in programs designed to assist the applicant to achieve the minimum passing scores. Applicants prepared outside Minnesota who provide evidence of meeting all examination requirements for professional Minnesota licensure shall be granted the professional teaching licenses for which they qualify.

Subp. 12.

Review and modification.

The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall periodically review the examination system to determine whether the system meets the requirements of this part. Modifications by the board in the adoption of examinations or the minimum passing scores shall be published in the State Register. The modifications are effective for administration of the examinations 30 days after publication.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.185

History:

11 SR 1793; 15 SR 2267; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; 25 SR 877; 26 SR 700; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0550 ADDITIONAL FIELDS OF LICENSURE.

Subpart 1.

In general.

A person who holds a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, professional, or nonrenewable license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may apply for an additional field of licensure upon meeting the rule requirements for the licensure field and level. A person who holds only a board license as an educational speech-language pathologist, school nurse, school psychologist, school social worker, or school counselor, or a secondary vocational license other than one based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education must meet the rule requirements for the licensure field and level and part 8710.2000.

Subp. 2.

Middle level academic specialty.

A person may apply for licensure in a middle level academic specialty upon meeting the requirements of part 8710.3300 provided that the applicant holds one or more of the following classroom teaching licenses issued by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board: a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, professional, or nonrenewable license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education.

Subp. 3.

Kindergarten.

Until June 30, 2005, an applicant holding a current entrance or professional elementary teaching license first granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board prior to September 1, 2001, shall be granted kindergarten licensure upon submitting evidence of having completed requirements for methods of kindergarten education in a state-approved teacher preparation program at a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools and a recommendation for kindergarten licensure from that college or university.

Subp. 4.

Exemption from teaching experience.

On or before August 31, 2001, the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall waive the teaching experience requirement for all applicants for licensure as teachers of reading.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0600

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.0700 PROCEDURES FOR VOLUNTARY SURRENDER OF LICENSES.

Subpart 1.

Materials required to surrender license.

A person holding a license granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may voluntarily surrender the license by submitting to the executive director of the board the following:

A.

a written request to surrender which specifies the license or licenses to be surrendered;

B.

the applicant copy of the license;

C.

the school district copy of the license, together with a written statement that the designated administrator of the employing school district or charter school has been notified that the employer's copy of the license has been removed from the school district or charter school files; and

D.

the required processing fee in part 8710.0200.

Subp. 2.

Surrender date.

When the executive director receives the materials listed in subpart 1 by January 1, the date of surrender is July 1 of that year. When the materials are received after January 1, the date of surrender is July 1 of the following calendar year. An applicant may revoke the request. The revocation must be made in writing to the executive director no later than December 31 of the year in which the request for voluntary surrender is received by the executive director.

Subp. 3.

When surrender is prohibited.

A person may not voluntarily surrender a license if any of the following exists:

A.

the school board has commenced proceedings to terminate the continuing contract, pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.40, subdivision 9 or 13, or 122A.41, subdivision 6;

B.

the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board has commenced proceedings to suspend or revoke the license pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, sections 122A.20 and 214.10 or part 8710.2100; or

C.

any educational agency or board has commenced proceedings which could result in alteration of the status of the license due to the person's conduct.

Subp. 4.

First professional license after surrender.

A person whose Minnesota license has been voluntarily surrendered may apply for first professional licensure in the subject or field for which licensure was previously surrendered. A first professional license shall be granted to the applicant if the following criteria are met:

A.

a licensure rule exists in the subject or field for which licensure was previously surrendered;

B.

the applicant meets the first professional licensure standards which are in effect in the subject or field at the time of application and meets procedures set forth in Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board rules applicable to a first professional license; and

C.

the required processing fee set forth in part 8710.0200 accompanies the application for first professional licensure.

Subp. 5.

Construction of rule.

Nothing in subparts 1 to 4 shall prohibit a person from holding or applying for a license in any subject or field upon surrender of a license in another subject or field.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.185

History:

8 SR 244; 15 SR 2267; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0800 PROCEDURES FOR REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION OF ALL LICENSES.

Subpart 1.

Statutory requirements.

Licenses shall be revoked or suspended pursuant to the provisions of Minnesota Statutes, sections 122A.09 and 122A.20, or part 8710.2100.

Subp. 2.

Revocation.

Revocation shall include the cancellation or repeal of a license or renewal privilege. Revocation shall disqualify a person from teaching, or performing any other function, which is permitted on the basis of holding a license issued pursuant to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. Revocation shall be final, except that a person whose license has been revoked may petition the board for a license pursuant to part 8710.0850, subpart 1.

Subp. 3.

Suspension.

Suspension shall include the temporary withdrawal of a license or renewal privilege. Suspension shall disqualify a person from teaching or performing any other function which is permitted on the basis of holding a license issued pursuant to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. The length of each suspension and any terms and conditions attached thereto shall be determined by the board upon the consideration of the following factors:

A.

the activity of the individual which led to the license suspension;

B.

any relevant mitigating factors which the individual may interpose on the individual's behalf;

C.

the prior teaching record of the individual; and

D.

other similar factors.

Unless otherwise provided by the board, a revocation or suspension applies to each license or renewal privilege held by the individual at the time final action is taken by the board. A person whose license or renewal privilege has been suspended or revoked shall be ineligible to be issued any other license by the board during the pendency of the suspension or revocation.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.09; 125.185

History:

17 SR 1279; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0850 ISSUANCE OR REINSTATEMENT OF LICENSE AFTER REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION.

Subpart 1.

After revocation.

A person whose license or renewal privilege has been revoked by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may apply for and shall be granted a first professional license upon presentation of competent evidence that all terms and conditions which the board may have imposed have been fulfilled, and upon meeting current licensure standards.

Subp. 2.

After suspension.

A person whose license or renewal privilege has been suspended by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may apply for reinstatement of that license in one of the following manners:

A.

If the suspended license was a license which expired during the suspension, that license shall be renewed upon proper application after the period of suspension has expired provided that this chapter permits renewal of the license and that all renewal requirements have been met and upon presentation of competent evidence that all terms and conditions which the board may have imposed have been fulfilled.

B.

If the suspended license was a license which has not expired during the suspension, the person may resume teaching or performing any other function which is permitted on the basis of holding a license granted by the board for whatever period of time remains on that license after the period of the suspension has expired and upon presentation of competent evidence that all terms and conditions which the board may have imposed have been fulfilled.

C.

If the suspended license was a life license, the person may resume teaching or performing any other function which is permitted on the basis of holding a license granted by the board after the period of the suspension has expired and upon presentation of competent evidence that all terms and conditions which the board may have imposed have been fulfilled.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.09; 125.185

History:

L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.0900 APPEAL TO PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR LICENSING AND STANDARDS BOARD.

All persons denied issuance or renewal of licenses granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board, and all Minnesota teacher-preparing institutions denied program or institutional approval, and all persons licensed by the board whose appeals are denied by the local committee for continuing education/relicensures, are hereby entitled to a hearing pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14, on such denial and to a final decision by the board.

A person or an institution entitled to a hearing under the provisions of this part shall file a written request for such hearing with the executive secretary of the board within 30 days from the date of the denial. Failure to file a written request for a hearing within 30 days constitutes a waiver of the individual's right to a hearing.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18; 125.05; 125.185

History:

15 SR 2267; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 23 SR 1928; 25 SR 805; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.1000

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.1050

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.1100

[Repealed, 25 SR 805]

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.1200

[Repealed, 25 SR 805]

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.1250

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.1300

[Repealed, 25 SR 805]

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.1400

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.1410

[Repealed, 43 SR 463]

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

TEACHER STANDARDS

8710.2000 STANDARDS OF EFFECTIVE PRACTICE FOR TEACHERS.

Subpart 1.

Standards.

A candidate for teacher licensure shall show verification of completing the standards in subparts 2 to 11 in a teacher preparation program approved under chapter 8705.

Subp. 2.

Standard 1, subject matter.

A teacher must understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines taught and be able to create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. The teacher must:

A.

understand major concepts, assumptions, debates, processes of inquiry, and ways of knowing that are central to the disciplines taught;

B.

understand how students' conceptual frameworks and misconceptions for an area of knowledge can influence the students' learning;

C.

connect disciplinary knowledge to other subject areas and to everyday life;

D.

understand that subject matter knowledge is not a fixed body of facts but is complex and ever developing;

E.

use multiple representations and explanations of subject matter concepts to capture key ideas and link them to students' prior understandings;

F.

use varied viewpoints, theories, ways of knowing, and methods of inquiry in teaching subject matter concepts;

G.

evaluate teaching resources and curriculum materials for comprehensiveness, accuracy, and usefulness for presenting particular ideas and concepts;

H.

engage students in generating knowledge and testing hypotheses according to the methods of inquiry and standards of evidence used in the discipline;

I.

develop and use curricula that encourage students to understand, analyze, interpret, and apply ideas from varied perspectives; and

J.

design interdisciplinary learning experiences that allow students to integrate knowledge, skills, and methods of inquiry across several subject areas.

Subp. 3.

Standard 2, student learning.

A teacher must understand how students learn and develop and must provide learning opportunities that support a student's intellectual, social, and personal development. The teacher must:

A.

understand how students internalize knowledge, acquire skills, and develop thinking behaviors, and know how to use instructional strategies that promote student learning;

B.

understand that a student's physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development influence learning and know how to address these factors when making instructional decisions;

C.

understand developmental progressions of learners and ranges of individual variation within the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive domains, be able to identify levels of readiness in learning, and understand how development in any one domain may affect performance in others;

D.

use a student's strengths as a basis for growth, and a student's errors as opportunities for learning;

E.

assess both individual and group performance and design developmentally appropriate instruction that meets the student's current needs in the cognitive, social, emotional, moral, and physical domains;

F.

link new ideas to familiar ideas; make connections to a student's experiences; provide opportunities for active engagement, manipulation, and testing of ideas and materials; and encourage students to assume responsibility for shaping their learning tasks;

G.

use a student's thinking and experiences as a resource in planning instructional activities by encouraging discussion, listening and responding to group interaction, and eliciting oral, written, and other samples of student thinking; and

H.

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts related to technology and student learning.

Subp. 4.

Standard 3, diverse learners.

A teacher must understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to students with diverse backgrounds and exceptionalities. The teacher must:

A.

understand and identify differences in approaches to learning and performance, including varied learning styles and performance modes and multiple intelligences; and know how to design instruction that uses a student's strengths as the basis for continued learning;

B.

know about areas of exceptionality in learning, including learning disabilities, perceptual difficulties, and special physical or mental challenges, gifts, and talents;

C.

know about the process of second language acquisition and about strategies to support the learning of students whose first language is not English;

D.

understand how to recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases, discrimination, prejudices, and institutional and personal racism and sexism;

E.

understand how a student's learning is influenced by individual experiences, talents, and prior learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values;

F.

understand the contributions and lifestyles of the various racial, cultural, and economic groups in our society;

G.

understand the cultural content, world view, and concepts that comprise Minnesota-based American Indian tribal government, history, language, and culture;

H.

understand cultural and community diversity; and know how to learn about and incorporate a student's experiences, cultures, and community resources into instruction;

I.

understand that all students can and should learn at the highest possible levels and persist in helping all students achieve success;

J.

know about community and cultural norms;

K.

identify and design instruction appropriate to a student's stages of development, learning styles, strengths, and needs;

L.

use teaching approaches that are sensitive to the varied experiences of students and that address different learning and performance modes;

M.

accommodate a student's learning differences or needs regarding time and circumstances for work, tasks assigned, communication, and response modes;

N.

identify when and how to access appropriate services or resources to meet exceptional learning needs;

O.

use information about students' families, cultures, and communities as the basis for connecting instruction to students' experiences;

P.

bring multiple perspectives to the discussion of subject matter, including attention to a student's personal, family, and community experiences and cultural norms;

Q.

develop a learning community in which individual differences are respected; and

R.

identify and apply technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities.

Subp. 5.

Standard 4, instructional strategies.

A teacher must understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. The teacher must:

A.

understand Minnesota's graduation standards and how to implement them;

B.

understand the cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning and how these processes can be stimulated;

C.

understand principles and techniques, along with advantages and limitations, associated with various instructional strategies;

D.

nurture the development of student critical thinking, independent problem solving, and performance capabilities;

E.

demonstrate flexibility and reciprocity in the teaching process as necessary for adapting instruction to student responses, ideas, and needs;

F.

design teaching strategies and materials to achieve different instructional purposes and to meet student needs including developmental stages, prior knowledge, learning styles, and interests;

G.

use multiple teaching and learning strategies to engage students in active learning opportunities that promote the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance capabilities and that help students assume responsibility for identifying and using learning resources;

H.

monitor and adjust strategies in response to learner feedback;

I.

vary the instructional process to address the content and purposes of instruction and the needs of students;

J.

develop a variety of clear, accurate presentations and representations of concepts, using alternative explanations to assist students' understanding and present varied perspectives to encourage critical thinking;

K.

use educational technology to broaden student knowledge about technology, to deliver instruction to students at different levels and paces, and to stimulate advanced levels of learning; and

L.

develop, implement, and evaluate lesson plans that include methods and strategies to maximize learning that incorporate a wide variety of materials and technology resources.

Subp. 6.

Standard 5, learning environment.

A teacher must be able to use an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create learning environments that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. The teacher must:

A.

understand human motivation and behavior and draw from the foundational sciences of psychology, anthropology, and sociology to develop strategies for organizing and supporting individual and group work;

B.

understand how social groups function and influence people, and how people influence groups;

C.

know how to create learning environments that contribute to the self-esteem of all persons and to positive interpersonal relations;

D.

know how to help people work productively and cooperatively with each other in complex social settings;

E.

understand the principles of effective classroom management and use a range of strategies to promote positive relationships, cooperation, and purposeful learning in the classroom;

F.

know factors and situations that are likely to promote or diminish intrinsic motivation and how to help students become self-motivated;

G.

understand how participation supports commitment;

H.

establish a positive climate in the classroom and participate in maintaining a positive climate in the school as a whole;

I.

establish peer relationships to promote learning;

J.

recognize the relationship of intrinsic motivation to student lifelong growth and learning;

K.

use different motivational strategies that are likely to encourage continuous development of individual learner abilities;

L.

design and manage learning communities in which students assume responsibility for themselves and one another, participate in decision making, work both collaboratively and independently, and engage in purposeful learning activities;

M.

engage students in individual and group learning activities that help them develop the motivation to achieve, by relating lessons to students' personal interests, allowing students to have choices in their learning, and leading students to ask questions and pursue problems that are meaningful to them and the learning;

N.

organize, allocate, and manage the resources of time, space, activities, and attention to provide active engagement of all students in productive tasks;

O.

maximize the amount of class time spent in learning by creating expectations and processes for communication and behavior along with a physical setting conducive to classroom goals;

P.

develop expectations for student interactions, academic discussions, and individual and group responsibility that create a positive classroom climate of openness, mutual respect, support, inquiry, and learning;

Q.

analyze the classroom environment and make decisions and adjustments to enhance social relationships, student motivation and engagement, and productive work; and

R.

organize, prepare students for, and monitor independent and group work that allows for full, varied, and effective participation of all individuals.

Subp. 7.

Standard 6, communication.

A teacher must be able to use knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. The teacher must:

A.

understand communication theory, language development, and the role of language in learning;

B.

understand how cultural and gender differences can affect communication in the classroom;

C.

understand the importance of nonverbal as well as verbal communication;

D.

know effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques;

E.

understand the power of language for fostering self-expression, identity development, and learning;

F.

use effective listening techniques;

G.

foster sensitive communication by and among all students in the class;

H.

use effective communication strategies in conveying ideas and information and in asking questions;

I.

support and expand learner expression in speaking, writing, and other media;

J.

know how to ask questions and stimulate discussion in different ways for particular purposes, including probing for learner understanding, helping students articulate their ideas and thinking processes, promoting productive risk-taking and problem-solving, facilitating factual recall, encouraging convergent and divergent thinking, stimulating curiosity, and helping students to question; and

K.

use a variety of media and educational technology to enrich learning opportunities.

Subp. 8.

Standard 7, planning instruction.

A teacher must be able to plan and manage instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals. The teacher must:

A.

understand learning theory, subject matter, curriculum development, and student development and know how to use this knowledge in planning instruction to meet curriculum goals;

B.

plan instruction using contextual considerations that bridge curriculum and student experiences;

C.

plan instructional programs that accommodate individual student learning styles and performance modes;

D.

create short-range and long-range plans that are linked to student needs and performance;

E.

design lessons and activities that operate at multiple levels to meet the developmental and individual needs of students and to help all progress;

F.

implement learning experiences that are appropriate for curriculum goals, relevant to learners, and based on principles of effective instruction including activating student prior knowledge, anticipating preconceptions, encouraging exploration and problem solving, and building new skills on those previously acquired;

G.

evaluate plans in relation to short-range and long-range goals, and systematically adjust plans to meet student needs and enhance learning; and

H.

plan for the management of technology resources within the context of learning activities and develop strategies to manage student learning in a technology-integrated environment.

Subp. 9.

Standard 8, assessment.

A teacher must understand and be able to use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the student. The teacher must:

A.

be able to assess student performance toward achievement of the Minnesota graduation standards under chapter 3501;

B.

understand the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of different types of assessments including criterion-referenced and norm-referenced instruments, traditional standardized and performance-based tests, observation systems, and assessments of student work;

C.

understand the purpose of and differences between assessment and evaluation;

D.

understand measurement theory and assessment-related issues, including validity, reliability, bias, and scoring concerns;

E.

select, construct, and use assessment strategies, instruments, and technologies appropriate to the learning outcomes being evaluated and to other diagnostic purposes;

F.

use assessment to identify student strengths and promote student growth and to maximize student access to learning opportunities;

G.

use varied and appropriate formal and informal assessment techniques including observation, portfolios of student work, teacher-made tests, performance tasks, projects, student self-assessments, peer assessment, and standardized tests;

H.

use assessment data and other information about student experiences, learning behaviors, needs, and progress to increase knowledge of students, evaluate student progress and performance, and modify teaching and learning strategies;

I.

implement students' self-assessment activities to help them identify their own strengths and needs and to encourage them to set personal goals for learning;

J.

evaluate the effect of class activities on both individuals and the class as a whole using information gained through observation of classroom interactions, questioning, and analysis of student work;

K.

monitor teaching strategies and behaviors in relation to student success to modify plans and instructional approaches to achieve student goals;

L.

establish and maintain student records of work and performance;

M.

responsibly communicate student progress based on appropriate indicators to students, parents or guardians, and other colleagues; and

N.

use technology resources to collect and analyze data, interpret results, and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning.

Subp. 10.

Standard 9, reflection and professional development.

A teacher must be a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of choices and actions on others, including students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and who actively seeks out opportunities for professional growth. The teacher must:

A.

understand the historical and philosophical foundations of education;

B.

understand methods of inquiry, self-assessment, and problem-solving strategies for use in professional self-assessment;

C.

understand the influences of the teacher's behavior on student growth and learning;

D.

know major areas of research on teaching and of resources available for professional development;

E.

understand the role of reflection and self-assessment on continual learning;

F.

understand the value of critical thinking and self-directed learning;

G.

understand professional responsibility and the need to engage in and support appropriate professional practices for self and colleagues;

H.

use classroom observation, information about students, and research as sources for evaluating the outcomes of teaching and learning and as a basis for reflecting on and revising practice;

I.

use professional literature, colleagues, and other resources to support development as both a student and a teacher;

J.

collaboratively use professional colleagues within the school and other professional arenas as supports for reflection, problem-solving, and new ideas, actively sharing experiences, and seeking and giving feedback;

K.

understand standards of professional conduct in the Code of Ethics for Minnesota Teachers in part 8710.2100;

L.

understand the responsibility for obtaining and maintaining licensure, the role of the teacher as a public employee, and the purpose and contributions of educational organizations; and

M.

understand the role of continuous development in technology knowledge and skills representative of technology applications for education.

Subp. 11.

Standard 10, collaboration, ethics, and relationships.

A teacher must be able to communicate and interact with parents or guardians, families, school colleagues, and the community to support student learning and well-being. The teacher must:

A.

understand schools as organizations within the larger community context and understand the operations of the relevant aspects of the systems within which the teacher works;

B.

understand how factors in a student's environment outside of school, including family circumstances, community environments, health and economic conditions, may influence student life and learning;

C.

understand student rights and teacher responsibilities to equal education, appropriate education for students with disabilities, confidentiality, privacy, appropriate treatment of students, and reporting in situations of known or suspected abuse or neglect;

D.

understand the concept of addressing the needs of the whole learner;

E.

understand the influence of use and misuse of tobacco, alcohol, drugs, and other chemicals on student life and learning;

F.

understand data practices;

G.

collaborate with other professionals to improve the overall learning environment for students;

H.

collaborate in activities designed to make the entire school a productive learning environment;

I.

consult with parents, counselors, teachers of other classes and activities within the school, and professionals in other community agencies to link student environments;

J.

identify and use community resources to foster student learning;

K.

establish productive relationships with parents and guardians in support of student learning and well-being;

L.

understand mandatory reporting laws and rules; and

M.

understand the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the use of information and technology in prekindergarten through grade 12 schools and apply that understanding in practice.

Subp. 12.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595

Published Electronically:

January 14, 2016

8710.2100 CODE OF ETHICS FOR MINNESOTA TEACHERS.

Subpart 1.

Scope.

Each teacher, upon entering the teaching profession, assumes a number of obligations, one of which is to adhere to a set of principles which defines professional conduct. These principles are reflected in the following code of ethics, which sets forth to the education profession and the public it serves standards of professional conduct and procedures for implementation.

This code shall apply to all persons licensed according to rules established by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board.

Subp. 2.

Standards of professional conduct.

The standards of professional conduct are as follows:

A.

A teacher shall provide professional education services in a nondiscriminatory manner.

B.

A teacher shall make reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions harmful to health and safety.

C.

In accordance with state and federal laws, a teacher shall disclose confidential information about individuals only when a compelling professional purpose is served or when required by law.

D.

A teacher shall take reasonable disciplinary action in exercising the authority to provide an atmosphere conducive to learning.

E.

A teacher shall not use professional relationships with students, parents, and colleagues to private advantage.

F.

A teacher shall delegate authority for teaching responsibilities only to licensed personnel.

G.

A teacher shall not deliberately suppress or distort subject matter.

H.

A teacher shall not knowingly falsify or misrepresent records or facts relating to that teacher's own qualifications or to other teachers' qualifications.

I.

A teacher shall not knowingly make false or malicious statements about students or colleagues.

J.

A teacher shall accept a contract for a teaching position that requires licensing only if properly or provisionally licensed for that position.

Subp. 3.

Statutory enforcement of code: complaints, investigation, and hearing.

A.

The enforcement of the provisions of the code of ethics for Minnesota teachers shall be in accord with Minnesota Statutes, section 214.10:

"Minnesota Statutes, section 214.10, complaints; investigation and hearing.

Subd. 1. Receipt of complaint. The executive secretary of a board, a board member or any other person who performs services for the board who receives a complaint or other communication, whether oral or written, which complaint or communication alleges or implies a violation of a statute or rule which the board is empowered to enforce, shall promptly forward the substance of the communication on a form prepared by the attorney general to the designee of the attorney general responsible for providing legal services to the board. Before proceeding further with the communication, the designee of the attorney general may require the complaining party to state the complaint in writing on a form prepared by the attorney general. Complaints which relate to matters within the jurisdiction of another governmental agency shall be forwarded to that agency by the executive secretary. An officer of that agency shall advise the executive secretary of the disposition of that complaint. A complaint received by another agency which relates to a statute or rule which a licensing board is empowered to enforce shall be forwarded to the executive secretary of the board to be processed in accordance with this section.

Subd. 2. Investigation and hearing. The designee of the attorney general providing legal services to a board shall evaluate the communications forwarded by the board or its members or staff. If the communication alleges a violation of statute or rule which the board is to enforce, the designee is empowered to investigate the facts alleged in the communication. In the process of evaluation and investigation, the designee shall consult with or seek the assistance of the executive secretary or, if the board determines, a member of the board who has been designated by the board to assist the designee. The designee may also consult with or seek the assistance of any other qualified persons who are not members of the board who the designee believes will materially aid in the process of evaluation or investigation. The executive secretary or the consulted board member may attempt to correct improper activities and redress grievances through education, conference, conciliation, and persuasion, and in these attempts may be assisted by the designee of the attorney general. If the attempts at correction or redress do not produce satisfactory results in the opinion of the executive secretary or the consulted board member, or if after investigation the designee providing legal services to the board, the executive secretary or the consulted board member believes that the communication and the investigation suggest illegal or unauthorized activities warranting board action, the designee shall inform the executive secretary of the board who shall schedule a disciplinary hearing in accordance with Minnesota Statutes, chapter 14. Before the holding of a disciplinary hearing may be directed, the designee or executive secretary shall have considered the recommendations of the consulted board member. Before scheduling a disciplinary hearing, the executive secretary must have received a verified written complaint from the complaining party. A board member who was consulted during the course of an investigation may participate at the hearing but may not vote on any matter pertaining to the case. The executive secretary of the board shall promptly inform the complaining party of the final disposition of the complaint. Nothing in this section shall preclude the board from scheduling, on its own motion, a disciplinary hearing based upon the findings or report of the board's executive secretary, a board member or the designee of the attorney general assigned to the board. Nothing in this section shall preclude a member of the board or its executive secretary from initiating a complaint.

Subd. 3. Discovery; subpoenas. In all matters pending before it relating to its lawful regulation activities, a board may issue subpoenas and compel the attendance of witnesses and the production of all necessary papers, books, records, documents, and other evidentiary material. Any person failing or refusing to appear or testify regarding any matter about which the person may be lawfully questioned or produce any papers, books, records, documents, or other evidentiary materials in the matter to be heard, after having been required by order to the board or by a subpoena of the board to do so may, upon application to the district court in any district, be ordered to comply therewith. The chair of the board acting on behalf of the board may issue subpoenas and any board member may administer oaths to witnesses, or take their affirmation. Depositions may be taken within or without the state in the manner provided by law for the taking of depositions in civil actions. A subpoena or other process or paper may be served upon any person named therein, anywhere within the state by any officer authorized to serve subpoenas or other process or paper in civil actions, with the same fees and mileage and in the same manner as prescribed by law for service of process issued out of the district court of this state. Fees and mileage and other costs shall be paid as the board directs."

Subp. 4.

Complaints handled by board.

When oral complaints alleging violations of the code of ethics are received, the executive secretary of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall request the complaining party to submit the complaint in writing within ten days.

Upon the receipt of a complaint in writing alleging violations of the code of ethics, the teacher named in the complaint shall be notified in writing within ten days of the receipt of the complaint.

The teacher shall be entitled to be represented by the teacher's own counsel or representative at each stage of the investigation and hearing.

Subp. 5.

Enforcement procedures.

The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may impose one or more of the following penalties when it has found a violation of the code of ethics. These actions shall be taken only after all previous efforts at remediation have been exhausted.

A.

The board may enter into agreements with teachers accused of violating the code of ethics which would suspend or terminate proceedings against the teacher on conditions agreeable to both parties.

B.

A letter of censure from the board may be sent to the person determined to be in violation of the standards of the code of ethics. A copy of the letter shall be filed with the board. Such letters shall be kept on file for a period of time not to exceed one calendar year.

C.

A teacher who has been found to have violated the code of ethics may be placed on probationary licensure status for a period of time to be determined by the board. The board may impose conditions on the teacher during the probationary period which are to be directed toward improving the teacher's performance in the area of the violation. During this period, the teacher's performance or conduct will be subject to review by the board or its designee. Such review will be directed toward monitoring the teacher's activities or performance with regard to whatever conditions may be placed on the teacher during the probationary period. Before the end of the probationary period the board shall decide to extend or terminate the probationary licensure status or to take further disciplinary actions as are consistent with this rule.

D.

The license to teach of the person determined to be in violation of the standards of the code of ethics may be suspended for a period of time determined by the board.

E.

The license to teach of the person determined to be in violation of the standards of the code of ethics may be revoked by the board.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 125.185

History:

17 SR 1279; L 1998 c 397 art 11 s 3; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3000 TEACHERS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of early childhood education is authorized to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate learning experiences for young children from birth through grade 3 in a variety of early childhood settings and to collaborate with families, colleagues, and related service personnel to enhance the learning of all young children.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure in early childhood education for teaching young children from birth through age eight shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of early childhood education in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of early childhood education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to L.

A.

A teacher of infant or toddler-aged, preprimary-aged, and primary-aged children must understand child development and learning, including:

(1)

the research base for and the best practices of early childhood education;

(2)

the physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, and creative development of young children from birth through age eight;

(3)

how young children differ in their development and approaches to learning to support the development and learning of individual children;

(4)

the major theories of early childhood development and learning and their implications for practice with young children and families from birth through age eight;

(5)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young children;

(6)

that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture, and society; and

(7)

the interrelationships among culture, language, and thought and the function of the home language in the development of young children.

B.

A teacher of infants and toddlers plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the unique developmental milestones associated with young infants 0 to 9 months, mobile infants 8 to 18 months, and toddlers 16 to 36 months;

(2)

the need to build and maintain a primary care relationship with each infant and toddler;

(3)

how to build and maintain positive care giving relationships with infants and toddlers in groups;

(4)

how to use observation skills to determine infants' and toddlers' needs, interests, preferences, and particular ways of responding to people and things;

(5)

strategies for developing an appropriate learning environment that:

(a)

meet the physical needs of infants and toddlers through small and large group muscle play, feeding, diapering and toileting, and rest, including:

i.

health and safety procedures and universal precautions to limit the spread of infectious diseases;

ii.

symptoms of common illness and environmental hazards;

iii.

how to evaluate infant and toddler environments to ensure the physical and emotional safety of children in care; and

iv.

how to use environmental factors and conditions to promote the health, safety, and physical development of infants and toddlers;

(b)

use scheduling and daily routines to meet infants' and toddlers' needs for balance in predictable active and quiet activities, social and solitary experiences, reliable transitions, and rest;

(c)

use educational materials for infants and toddlers that balance needs for growing independence and active exploration with the need for safety and health;

(d)

create learning experiences that incorporate the infants' and toddlers' cultural and home experiences; and

(e)

use guidance and management techniques to accommodate the developmental characteristics of infants and toddlers and to support their need for a sense of security and self-esteem;

(6)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of cognitive development and how to use this information to establish individual cognitive development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

facilitate the acquisition of skills to acquire, organize, and use information in increasingly complex ways;

(b)

create experiences that enable infants and toddlers to use play as an organizer between the acquisition and use of information;

(c)

encourage curiosity and exploration;

(d)

support development of language and communication skills;

(e)

provide opportunities for infants and toddlers to use self-initiated repetition to practice newly acquired skills and to experience feelings of autonomy and success;

(f)

enhance infants' and toddlers' emerging knowledge of cause and effect and spatial relations;

(g)

encourage self-expression through developmentally appropriate music, movement, dramatic, and creative art experiences; and

(h)

provide a foundation for literacy and numeracy development through daily exposure to books, stories, language experiences, and activities that involve object relationships;

(7)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of social and emotional development and how to use this information to establish individual social and emotional development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

establish environments in which responsive and predictable interaction sequences occur;

(b)

structure the classroom to promote positive, constructive interactions between and among children;

(c)

promote healthy peer relationships;

(d)

adapt a pattern of care to meet infants' and toddlers' rapidly changing needs;

(e)

emphasize caregiving routines that allow for interaction and visual and tactile learning;

(f)

facilitate the development of infants' and toddlers' self-esteem; and

(g)

provide continuity and consistency of affectionate care for infants and toddlers;

(8)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of physical development and how to use this information to establish individual physical development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

foster a positive attitude toward activity;

(b)

enhance infants' and toddlers' perceptual skills, balance and coordination, and flexibility, strength, and endurance; and

(c)

create environments that provide opportunities for active physical exploration and the development of emerging fine and gross motor skills;

(9)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of creative development and how to use this information to establish individual creative development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

enhance infants' and toddlers' abilities to create their own ideas and solve problems through art, music, movement, dramatic play, and other creative activities;

(b)

develop experiences that encourage initiative, creativity, autonomy, and self-esteem, integrating adult support, comfort, and affection to facilitate these aspects of development; and

(c)

create an environment where infants and toddlers are able to explore and expand their creative abilities.

C.

A teacher of young children in preprimary classrooms plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the cognitive, social and emotional, physical, and creative development of preprimary-aged children and how children's development and learning are integrated;

(2)

the development of infants and toddlers and its effects on the learning and development of preprimary-aged children;

(3)

how to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for preprimary-aged children that:

(a)

acknowledge the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children's development and learning;

(b)

acknowledge the developmental consequences of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, and the development of mental health, and the importance of supportive relationships;

(c)

acknowledge basic health, nutrition, and safety management practices for young children, including procedures regarding childhood illness and communicable disease;

(d)

use appropriate health appraisal procedures and how to recommend referrals to appropriate community health and social services when necessary; and

(e)

recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and know responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities;

(4)

how to plan and implement appropriate curriculum and instructional practices based on developmental knowledge of individual preprimary-aged children, the community, and the curriculum goals and content, including how to use:

(a)

developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, and inquiry experiences to help children develop curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions; and

(b)

knowledge of the sequence of development to create and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences using children's ideas, needs, interests, culture, and home experiences;

(5)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of cognitive development and how to use this information to establish individual cognitive development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

facilitate the acquisition of skills to acquire, organize, and use information in increasingly complex ways;

(b)

create experiences that enable preprimary-aged children to use play as an organizer between the acquisition and use of information;

(c)

extend children's thinking and learning and move them to higher levels of functioning;

(d)

assist children to plan, evaluate, reflect on, revisit, and build on their own experiences;

(e)

allow children to construct understanding or relationships among objects, people, and events;

(f)

encourage the use and construction of numeracy skills;

(g)

encourage the development of language and communication skills;

(h)

encourage the use and construction of literacy skills; and

(i)

allow children to construct knowledge of the physical world, manipulate objects for desired effects, and understand cause-and-effect relationships;

(6)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of social and emotional development and how to use this information to establish individual social and emotional development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

establish environments in which responsive and predictable interaction sequences occur;

(b)

structure the classroom to promote positive and constructive interactions among children;

(c)

promote healthy peer relationships;

(d)

build in each child a sense of belonging, security, personal worth, and self-confidence toward learning;

(e)

allow for the construction of social knowledge, such as cooperating, helping, negotiating, and talking with others to solve problems;

(f)

facilitate the development of self-acceptance, self-control, and social responsiveness in children through the use of positive guidance techniques; and

(g)

promote children's understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of human differences due to social, cultural, physical, or developmental factors;

(7)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of physical development and how to use this information to establish individual physical development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

foster a positive attitude toward physical activity;

(b)

enhance preprimary-aged children's perceptual skills; balance and coordination; and flexibility, strength, and endurance;

(c)

support age-appropriate risk-taking within safe boundaries;

(d)

assist children in becoming competent in acquiring basic gross and fine motor skills;

(e)

facilitate children's understanding of maintaining a desirable level of nutrition, health, fitness, and physical safety; and

(f)

meet children's physiological needs for activity, sensory stimulation, fresh air, rest, hygiene, and nourishment and elimination; and

(8)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of creative development and how to use this information to establish individual creative development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

help children develop and sustain curiosity about the world including past, present, and future events, trends, relationships, and understandings;

(b)

build children's confidence, creativity, imagination, personal expression of thoughts and feelings, initiative, and persistence in task completion;

(c)

encourage children to express ideas and feelings;

(d)

provide children with opportunities to use materials in self-selected and self-directed ways;

(e)

use open-ended activities to reinforce positive self-esteem and individuality among children; and

(f)

promote shared problem solving, creativity, and conceptual integration among children.

D.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the cognitive, social and emotional, physical, and creative development of primary-aged children and how children's development and learning are integrated;

(2)

how to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for primary-aged children that:

(a)

acknowledge the influence of the physical setting, scheduling, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote young children's development and learning;

(b)

acknowledge developmental consequences of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, and the development of mental health and the acceptance of supportive relationships;

(c)

acknowledge basic health, nutrition, and safety management practices for primary-aged children, including procedures regarding childhood illness and communicable diseases; and

(d)

recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and know responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities;

(3)

how to create learning environments that emphasize play, active manipulation of concrete materials, child choice and decision making, exploration of the environment, and interactions with others;

(4)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching language and literacy, including how to:

(a)

use teaching practices that support and enhance literacy development at all developmental levels;

(b)

use appropriate techniques for broadening the listening, speaking, reading, and writing vocabularies of primary-aged children;

(c)

develop primary-aged children's ability to use spoken, visual, and written language to communicate with a variety of audiences for different purposes; and

(d)

communicate with adult caregivers of primary-aged children about concepts of language and literacy development and age-appropriate learning materials;

(5)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching mathematics, including:

(a)

the use and understanding of mathematics and of how primary-aged children learn mathematics to guide instruction that develops children's understanding of number sense and number systems, geometry, and measurement;

(b)

planning activities that develop primary-aged children's understanding of mathematics and increases their ability to apply mathematics to everyday problems;

(c)

helping primary-aged children experience mathematics as a way to explore and solve problems in their environment at home and in school through open-ended work that includes child-invented strategies with different problems, games, and authentic situations;

(d)

selecting and creating a variety of resources, materials, and activities for counting and studying patterns and mathematical relationships;

(e)

building learning environments where children can construct their own knowledge for learning mathematics;

(f)

providing objects, counters, charts, graphs, and other materials to help primary-aged children express ideas, and represent and record problem solving through numbers and symbols;

(g)

using field trips, science experiments, cooking and snack times, sports, and games to use mathematics to solve problems, to symbolize phenomena and relationships, and to communicate quantitative information; and

(h)

asking questions to clarify how primary-aged children perceive a problem, develop a strategy, and understand different approaches to reasoning and thinking in mathematics;

(6)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching science, including:

(a)

supporting primary-aged children's enthusiasm, wonder, and curiosity about the world and increase their understanding of the world;

(b)

building on primary-aged children's capabilities for using their senses to acquire information by examining, exploring, comparing, classifying, describing, and asking questions about materials and events in their environment;

(c)

creating engaging and useful interdisciplinary projects that introduce primary-aged children to the major ideas of science;

(d)

encouraging primary-aged children to make predictions, gather and classify data, carry out investigations, make observations, and test ideas about natural phenomena and materials; and

(e)

designing experiences to help primary-aged children construct and build their knowledge of science;

(7)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching social studies, including:

(a)

building on primary-aged children's experiences in their classrooms, homes, and communities to enrich understandings about social relationships and phenomena;

(b)

leading primary-aged children to examine and discuss similarities, common interests, and needs and important differences among peoples, communities, and nations; and

(c)

promoting social development, democratic ideals, civic values, cooperative relationships, and mutual respect within the school community while helping primary-aged children grow as citizens;

(8)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching visual and performing arts, including:

(a)

providing primary-aged children with the time, materials, and opportunities to explore, manipulate, and create using a variety of media;

(b)

providing primary-aged children with experiences producing, discussing, and enjoying various forms of the arts, including visual art, music, creative drama, and dance;

(c)

enabling primary-aged children to understand how the arts represent different ways to perceive and interpret the world;

(d)

promoting primary-aged children's knowledge of various criteria for evaluating the arts; and

(e)

using a variety of artistic materials and techniques for discussing, experiencing, and thinking about important and interesting questions and phenomena with primary-aged children; and

(9)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching health and physical education, including:

(a)

providing experiences to encourage personal and community health promotion, disease prevention, and safety;

(b)

applying movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills; and

(c)

encouraging the development of a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

E.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes, development, and instruction, including:

(1)

oral and written language development, including:

(a)

relationships among reading, writing, and oral language and the interdependent nature of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to promote reading proficiency;

(b)

the use of formal and informal oral language and writing opportunities across the curriculum to help students make connections between their oral language and reading and writing, particularly English learners; and

(c)

the interrelated elements of language arts instruction that support the reading development of English learners, including ways in which the writing systems of other languages may differ from English and factors and processes involved in transferring literacy competencies from one language to another;

(2)

phonological and phonemic awareness, including:

(a)

the phonemes that make up the English language;

(b)

the ways in which reading achievement is related to phonological and phonemic awareness, including the ability to recognize word boundaries; to rhyme; and to blend, segment, substitute, and delete sounds in words; and

(c)

the instructional progression of phonological awareness, for example, words, syllables, onsets and rimes, and phonemes;

(3)

concepts about print, including:

(a)

knowledge about how letters, words, and sentences are represented in written English;

(b)

the importance of teaching uppercase and lowercase letter recognition and formation; and

(c)

the instructional progression of the alphabetic principle;

(4)

phonics and other word identification strategies and fluency, including:

(a)

systematic, explicit phonics instruction that is sequenced according to the increasing complexity of linguistic units;

(b)

word identification strategies and common, irregular sight words;

(c)

the stages of spelling development and systematic planning for spelling instruction related to the stages of spelling development;

(d)

how the etymology and morphology of words relate to orthographic patterns in English; and

(e)

the development of reading fluency;

(5)

knowledge of how to develop vocabulary knowledge, including:

(a)

understanding the critical role vocabulary knowledge plays in reading;

(b)

how to provide explicit instruction in vocabulary development and how to determine the meaning and accurate use of unfamiliar words encountered through listening and reading; and

(c)

how to provide opportunities to engage in early and continual language experiences to increase vocabulary by modeling and explicitly teaching students a variety of strategies for gaining meaning from unfamiliar words;

(6)

comprehension processes related to reading, including:

(a)

knowledge of how proficient readers read, how to facilitate listening comprehension, and how to develop comprehension of print material;

(b)

the levels of comprehension, how to explicitly teach and provide guided practice in comprehension skills and strategies; and

(c)

how to facilitate comprehension at various stages of reading development by selecting and using a range of texts, activities, and strategies before, during, and after reading;

(7)

content-area literacy, including:

(a)

knowledge of reading comprehension processes necessary to comprehend different types of informational materials and content-area texts; and

(b)

the structures and features of expository (informational) texts and effective reading strategies to address different text structures and purposes for reading;

(8)

literary response and analysis, including:

(a)

knowledge of how to provide frequent opportunities to listen to and read high-quality literature for different purposes;

(b)

knowledge of how to select, evaluate, and respond to literature from a range of genres, eras, perspectives, and cultures; and

(c)

knowledge of how to analyze and teach literary text structures and elements and criticism drawing upon literature and instructional needs and interests; and

(9)

structure of the English language, including:

(a)

basic knowledge of English conventions and the structure of the English language (sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, syntax, and semantics);

(b)

knowledge of how to enhance literacy skills including helping students understand similarities and differences between language structures used in spoken and written English;

(c)

basic knowledge of English syntax and semantics and the ability to use this knowledge to improve reading competence including how to help students interpret and apply English grammar and language conventions in authentic reading, writing, listening, and speaking contexts; and

(d)

knowledge of how to help students consolidate knowledge of English grammar and improve reading fluency and comprehension by providing frequent opportunities to listen to, read, and reread materials.

F.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of and ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(1)

appropriate, motivating instruction, both explicit and implicit, in:

(a)

oral language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, phonemic awareness, and word awareness;

(c)

the teaching of phonics, sight words, spelling, and fluency, including the selection, design, and use of instructional programs, materials, texts, and activities; and

(d)

applying a variety of reading comprehension strategies to different types of informational materials and content-area texts including teaching the structures and features of expository texts;

(2)

selection, design, and use of appropriate and engaging instructional strategies, activities, and materials, including:

(a)

multisensory techniques to ensure that students learn concepts about print including how to recognize and write letters;

(b)

teaching vocabulary using a range of instructional activities to extend students' understanding of words;

(c)

teaching comprehension skills and strategies, including opportunities for guided and independent work;

(3)

selection and appropriate use of a wide range of engaging texts representing various genres and cultures when designing reading lessons; the ability to facilitate and develop students' responses to literature and critical reading abilities through high level, interactive discussions about texts;

(4)

selection and appropriate explicit instruction and guided practice to teach written-language structures using a range of approaches and activities to develop the students' facility to comprehend and use academic language;

(5)

development of a literacy framework to coherently organize reading programs and effectively implement lessons, including a variety of grouping strategies, guided practice, and independent work; and

(6)

the ability to design purposeful lessons and tasks based on the qualities, structures, and difficulty of texts and the reading needs of individual students, including the selection and use of supplementary materials to support the reading development of struggling and gifted readers.

G.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of and ability to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, including:

(1)

formal and informal tools to assess students':

(a)

oral and written language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, and phonological and phonemic awareness;

(c)

understanding of concepts about print and the alphabetic principle;

(d)

knowledge of and skills in applying phonics and other word identification strategies, spelling strategies, and fluency;

(e)

vocabulary knowledge in relation to specific reading needs and texts;

(f)

comprehension of narrative and expository texts and the use of comprehension strategies, including determining independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels;

(g)

comprehension in content-area reading;

(h)

the ability to evaluate and respond to a range of literature and analyze text structures and elements; and

(i)

oral and written language to determine the understanding and use of English language structures and conventions;

(2)

formal and informal tools to:

(a)

plan, evaluate, and differentiate instruction to meet the needs of students from various cognitive, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds; and

(b)

design and implement appropriate classroom interventions for struggling readers and enrichment programs for gifted readers;

(3)

the ability to work with reading specialists, gifted and talented specialists, and other staff on advanced intervention and enrichment programs;

(4)

the ability to communicate results of assessments to specific individuals in accurate and coherent ways that indicate how the results might impact student achievement;

(5)

the ability to administer selected assessments and analyze and use data to plan instruction through a structured clinical experience linked to university reading course work; and

(6)

the ability to understand the appropriate uses of each kind of assessment and the concepts of validity and reliability.

H.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have the ability to create a literate and motivating environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments, including:

(1)

knowledge of how to use interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading program and provide authentic reasons to read and write;

(2)

the ability to support students and colleagues in the selection or design of materials that match reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

the development and implementation of classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4)

the ability to create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment and teacher and student interactions that promote ongoing engagement and literacy for all students;

(5)

the ability to foster independence and self-efficacy in readers;

(6)

the development of independent reading by encouraging and guiding students in selecting independent reading materials, promoting extensive independent reading by providing daily opportunities for self-selected reading and frequent opportunities for sharing what is read; and motivating students to read independently by regularly reading aloud and providing access to a variety of reading materials; and

(7)

the use of a variety of strategies to motivate students to read at home; encourage and provide support for parents or guardians to read to their children, in English or in the primary languages of English learners; and to use additional strategies to promote literacy in the home.

I.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must demonstrate a view of professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility, including:

(1)

exhibiting a particular stance towards professional development. Beginning teachers view learning about reading processes and reading development, and becoming more proficient as a teacher of reading, as a career-long effort and responsibility;

(2)

displaying positive dispositions toward the act of reading and the teaching of reading, including a belief that all students can learn to read regardless of cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

providing support for reading development by communicating regularly with parents or caregivers and eliciting support in reading development;

(4)

understanding how to provide instructions for paraprofessionals and volunteers working in the classroom to ensure that these individuals provide effective supplementary reading instruction;

(5)

engaging in personal learning as a daily and long-term goal to inform instructional practices, including reflection on practices, to improve daily instructional decisions and interactions with students; and

(6)

collaborate with other professionals on literacy learning initiatives.

J.

A teacher of young children establishes and maintains positive, collaborative relationships with families. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the need to respect families' choices and goals for their children and the need to communicate with families about curriculum and their children's progress;

(2)

the need to be sensitive to differences in family structures and social and cultural backgrounds;

(3)

theories of families and dynamics, roles, and relationships within families and between families and communities;

(4)

how to support families in assessing educational options and in making decisions related to child development and parenting; and

(5)

how to link families with a range of family-oriented services based on identified resources, priorities, and concerns.

K.

A teacher of young children uses informal and formal assessment and evaluation strategies to plan and individualize curriculum and teaching practices. The teacher must understand:

(1)

observing, recording, and assessing young children's development and learning and engage children in self-assessment;

(2)

using information gained by observation of family dynamics and relationships to support the child's learning;

(3)

using assessment results to identify needs and learning styles and to plan appropriate programs, environments, and interactions; and

(4)

developing and using formative and summative program evaluation instruments to enhance and maintain comprehensive program quality for children, families, and the community.

L.

A teacher of young children understands historical and contemporary development of early childhood education. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the multiple historical, philosophical, and social foundations of early childhood education and how these foundations influence current thought and practice; and

(2)

the effects of societal conditions on children and families, and current issues and trends, legal issues, and legislation and other public policies affecting children, families, and programs for young children and the early childhood profession.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of early childhood education must have a variety of field experiences which must include at least 100 school-based or home-based hours prior to student teaching that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: infant/toddler, preschool, and kindergarten through grade 3 within a range of educational programming models.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in no more than two placements, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board rules governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3100 TEACHERS OF PARENT AND FAMILY EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of parent and family education is authorized to instruct parents in an early childhood family education program.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach parent and family education in an early childhood family education program shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of parent and family education in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of parent and family education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of parent and family education must understand families:

(1)

the parent's role as primary socializer and educator of the family;

(2)

theories of family dynamics;

(3)

family communication;

(4)

family structures;

(5)

family strengths from multiple perspectives;

(6)

human sexual behavior;

(7)

gender roles;

(8)

family decision-making and problem-solving processes;

(9)

the effects of disabilities on family relationships;

(10)

the reciprocal relationships between family and community;

(11)

the effects of culture and ethnicity on family relationships;

(12)

the interaction of socioeconomic situations and family dynamics;

(13)

the influence of public policies on families;

(14)

influence of the social and historical climate on families; and

(15)

the effects of change and loss on family functioning.

B.

A teacher of parent and family education must understand parent-child relationships:

(1)

multidisciplinary descriptions of parenting practices and healthy parent-child relationships;

(2)

theories of parent-child interaction;

(3)

the reciprocal nature of parent-child relationships;

(4)

the impact of parent expectations, practices, and behaviors on the child's development;

(5)

the impact of work and other external influences on parental behaviors;

(6)

stages of parenting across the life span;

(7)

mother-child, father-child, and other primary caregiver-child relationships;

(8)

the influence of adult partner relationships on parent-child relationships;

(9)

the signs of emotional distress, abuse, and neglect in parent-child relationships;

(10)

specific family situations, for example, single parenting, stepparenting, adolescent parenting, adoptive parenting, grandparenting, and the effects of disabilities on parenting; and

(11)

the effects of culture and ethnicity on parent-child relationships.

C.

A teacher of parent and family education must understand child development:

(1)

theories of child development;

(2)

social, psychological, physical, cognitive, language, and moral development;

(3)

individual differences among children;

(4)

the effects of disabilities on child development;

(5)

the influence of culture, community, and experiences on development;

(6)

the formation of a child's self-identity and self-esteem;

(7)

the role of play in child development;

(8)

sexuality development;

(9)

developmentally appropriate learning environments, activities, and interactions; and

(10)

the effects of health and nutrition on child development.

D.

A teacher of parent and family education must understand adult development:

(1)

that each adult is unique and exhibits individual patterns of development influenced by physical, social, cultural, psychological, and experiential factors;

(2)

biological changes in adulthood and developmental aspects of aging and the impact on adult learning;

(3)

adult learning and learning styles, adult cognitive development, and use of instructional strategies that promote adult learning and development;

(4)

theories of adult development and how to apply theory when making instructional decisions; and

(5)

how to apply the standards of effective practice in teaching adult students through a series of formal observations and directed instructional experiences with adults participating in early childhood and family education programs totaling at least 100 hours and including at least two written evaluations by faculty supervisors.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of parent and family education are effective on September 1, 2001, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3200 TEACHERS OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

The teacher of elementary education is authorized to teach all subjects to children in kindergarten through grade 6.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers listed in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of elementary education in kindergarten through grade 6 in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards, elementary education.

A candidate must complete a preparation program for licensure under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to L.

A.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must:

(1)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and elementary level education;

(2)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of young children;

(3)

understand and apply the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young children;

(4)

understand and apply the process and necessity of collaboration with families and other adults in support of the learning of young children; and

(5)

understand how to integrate curriculum across subject areas in developmentally appropriate ways.

B.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate the knowledge of fundamental concepts of communication arts and literature and the connections between them. The teacher must:

(1)

develop the skills and understanding to teach reading, writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and literature;

(2)

understand and apply teaching methods related to the developmental stages of language;

(3)

use a variety of developmentally appropriate techniques for augmenting the listening, speaking, reading, and writing vocabularies of children;

(4)

know how to integrate the communication arts;

(5)

develop children's use of a process to write competently with confidence, accuracy, and imagination appropriate to the purpose and audience;

(6)

develop children's ability to use written, spoken, and visual language to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes;

(7)

know children's and young adolescents' literature representing a variety of genre; and

(8)

know how to use books and other printed sources to develop children's personal growth and lifelong learning.

C.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes, development, and instruction, including:

(1)

oral and written language development, including:

(a)

relationships among reading, writing, and oral language and the interdependent nature of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to promote reading proficiency;

(b)

the use of formal and informal oral language and writing opportunities across the curriculum to help students make connections between oral language and reading and writing, particularly English learners; and

(c)

the interrelated elements of language arts instruction that support the reading development of English learners, including ways in which the writing systems of other languages may differ from English and factors and processes involved in transferring literacy competencies from one language to another.

(2)

phonological and phonemic awareness, including:

(a)

the phonemes that make up the English language;

(b)

the ways in which reading achievement is related to phonological and phonemic awareness, including the ability to recognize word boundaries, to rhyme, and to blend, segment, substitute, and delete sounds in words; and

(c)

the instructional progression of phonological awareness, for example, words, syllables, onsets and rimes, and phonemes;

(3)

concepts about print, including:

(a)

knowledge about how letters, words, and sentences are represented in written English;

(b)

the importance of teaching uppercase and lowercase letter recognition and formation; and

(c)

the instructional progression of the alphabetic principle;

(4)

phonics and other word identification strategies and fluency, including:

(a)

systematic, explicit phonics instruction that is sequenced according to the increasing complexity of linguistic units;

(b)

word identification strategies and common, irregular sight words;

(c)

the stages of spelling development and systematic planning for spelling instruction related to the stages of spelling development;

(d)

how the etymology and morphology of words relate to orthographic patterns in English; and

(e)

the development of reading fluency;

(5)

knowledge of how to develop vocabulary knowledge, including:

(a)

understanding the critical role vocabulary knowledge plays in reading;

(b)

how to provide explicit instruction in vocabulary development and in determining the meaning and accurate use of unfamiliar words encountered through listening and reading; and

(c)

how to provide opportunities for students to engage in early and continual language experiences to increase vocabulary by modeling and explicitly teaching students a variety of strategies for gaining meaning from unfamiliar words;

(6)

comprehension processes related to reading, including:

(a)

knowledge of how proficient readers read, how to facilitate listening comprehension, and how to develop comprehension of print material;

(b)

the levels of comprehension, how to explicitly teach and provide guided practice in comprehension skills and strategies; and

(c)

how to facilitate comprehension at various stages of reading development by selecting and using a range of texts, activities, and strategies before, during, and after reading;

(7)

content-area literacy, including:

(a)

knowledge of reading comprehension processes necessary to comprehend different types of informational materials and content-area texts; and

(b)

the structures and features of expository (informational) texts and effective reading strategies to address different text structures and purposes for reading;

(8)

literary response and analysis, including:

(a)

knowledge of how to provide frequent opportunities to listen to and read high-quality literature for different purposes;

(b)

knowledge of how to select, evaluate, and respond to literature from a range of genres, eras, perspectives, and cultures; and

(c)

knowledge of how to analyze and teach literary text structures and elements and criticism, drawing upon literature and instructional needs and interests;

(9)

structure of the English language, including:

(a)

basic knowledge of English conventions and the structure of the English language (sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, syntax, and semantics);

(b)

knowledge of how to enhance literacy skills including helping students understand similarities and differences between language structures used in spoken and written English;

(c)

basic knowledge of English syntax and semantics and the ability to use this knowledge to improve reading competence, including how to help students interpret and apply English grammar and language conventions in authentic reading, writing, listening, and speaking contexts; and

(d)

knowledge of how to help students consolidate knowledge of English grammar and improve reading fluency and comprehension by providing frequent opportunities to listen to, read, and reread materials.

D.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must have knowledge of and ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(1)

appropriate, motivating instruction, both explicit and implicit, in:

(a)

oral language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, phonemic awareness, and word awareness;

(c)

the teaching of phonics, sight words, spelling, and fluency, including the selection, design, and use of instructional programs, materials, texts, and activities; and

(d)

applying a variety of reading comprehension strategies to different types of informational materials and content-area texts including teaching the structures and features of expository texts;

(2)

selection, design, and use of appropriate and engaging instructional strategies, activities, and materials, including:

(a)

multisensory techniques to ensure that students learn concepts about print including how to recognize and write letters;

(b)

teaching vocabulary using a range of instructional activities to extend students' understanding of words; and

(c)

teaching comprehension skills and strategies, including opportunities for guided and independent work;

(3)

selection and appropriate use of a wide range of engaging texts representing various genres and cultures when designing reading lessons; the ability to facilitate and develop students' responses to literature and critical reading abilities through high level, interactive discussions about texts;

(4)

selection and appropriate explicit instruction and guided practice to teach written-language structures using a range of approaches and activities to develop students' facility in comprehending and using academic language;

(5)

development of a literacy framework to coherently organize reading programs and effectively implement lessons, including a variety of grouping strategies, guided practice, and independent work; and

(6)

the ability to design purposeful lessons and tasks based on the qualities, structures, and difficulty of texts and the reading needs of individuals, including the selection and use of supplementary materials to support the reading development of struggling and gifted readers.

E.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must have knowledge of and ability to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, including:

(1)

formal and informal tools to assess students':

(a)

oral and written language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, and phonological and phonemic awareness;

(c)

understanding of concepts about print and the alphabetic principle;

(d)

knowledge of and skills in applying phonics and other word identification strategies, spelling strategies, and fluency;

(e)

vocabulary knowledge in relation to specific reading needs and texts;

(f)

comprehension of narrative and expository texts and the use of comprehension strategies, including determining independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels;

(g)

comprehension in content area reading;

(h)

ability to evaluate and respond to a range of literature and analyze text structures and elements; and

(i)

oral and written language to determine understanding and use of English language structures and conventions;

(2)

formal and informal tools to:

(a)

plan, evaluate, and differentiate instruction to meet the needs of students from various cognitive, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds; and

(b)

design and implement appropriate classroom interventions for struggling readers and enrichment programs for gifted readers;

(3)

the ability to work with reading specialists, gifted and talented specialists, and other staff on advanced intervention and enrichment programs;

(4)

the ability to communicate results of assessments to specific individuals in accurate and coherent ways that indicate how the results might impact student achievement;

(5)

the ability to administer selected assessments and analyze and use data to plan instruction through a structured clinical experience linked to university reading course work; and

(6)

the ability to understand the appropriate uses of each kind of assessment and the concepts of validity and reliability.

F.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must have the ability to create a literate and motivating environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments, including:

(1)

knowledge of how to use interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading program and provide authentic reasons to read and write;

(2)

the ability to support students and colleagues in the selection or design of materials that match reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

the development and implementation of classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4)

the ability to create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment and teacher and student interactions that promote ongoing student engagement and literacy for students;

(5)

the ability to foster independence and self-efficacy in readers;

(6)

the development of independent reading by encouraging and guiding students in selecting independent reading materials, promoting extensive independent reading by providing daily opportunities for self-selected reading and frequent opportunities for sharing what is read; and motivating students to read independently by regularly reading aloud and providing access to a variety of reading materials; and

(7)

the use of a variety of strategies to motivate students to read at home; encourage and provide support for parents or guardians to read to their children, in English or in the primary languages of English learners; and to use additional strategies to promote literacy in the home.

G.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate a view of professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility. The teacher must:

(1)

exhibit a particular stance towards professional development. A beginning teacher must view learning about reading processes and student reading development, and becoming more proficient as a teacher of reading, as a career-long effort and responsibility;

(2)

display positive dispositions toward the act of reading and the teaching of reading, including a belief that students can learn to read regardless of cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

provide support for reading development by communicating regularly with parents or caregivers and eliciting their support in a student's reading development;

(4)

understand how to provide instructions for paraprofessionals and volunteers working in the classroom to ensure that these individuals provide effective supplementary reading instruction;

(5)

engage in personal learning as a daily and long-term goal to inform instructional practices, including reflection on practices to improve daily instructional decisions and interactions with students; and

(6)

collaborate with other professionals on literacy learning initiatives.

H.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts of mathematics and the connections between them. The teacher must know and apply:

(1)

concepts of mathematical patterns, relations, and functions, including the importance of number and geometric patterns in mathematics and the importance of the educational link between primary school activities with patterns and the later conceptual development of important ideas related to functions and be able to:

(a)

identify and justify observed patterns;

(b)

generate patterns to demonstrate a variety of relationships; and

(c)

relate patterns in one strand of mathematics to patterns across the discipline;

(2)

concepts and techniques of discrete mathematics and how to use them to solve problems from areas including graph theory, combinatorics, and recursion and know how to:

(a)

help students investigate situations that involve counting finite sets, calculating probabilities, tracing paths in network graphs, and analyzing iterative procedures; and

(b)

apply these ideas and methods in settings as diverse as the mathematics of finance, population dynamics, and optimal planning;

(3)

concepts of numerical literacy:

(a)

possess number sense and be able to use numbers to quantify concepts in the students' world;

(b)

understand a variety of computational procedures and how to use them in examining the reasonableness of the students' answers;

(c)

understand the concepts of number theory including divisibility, factors, multiples, and prime numbers, and know how to provide a basis for exploring number relationships; and

(d)

understand the relationships of integers and their properties that can be explored and generalized to other mathematical domains;

(4)

concepts of space and shape:

(a)

understand the properties and relationships of geometric figures;

(b)

understand geometry and measurement from both abstract and concrete perspectives and identify real world applications; and

(c)

know how to use geometric learning tools such as geoboards, compass and straight edge, ruler and protractor, patty paper, reflection tools, spheres, and platonic solids;

(5)

data investigations:

(a)

use a variety of conceptual and procedural tools for collecting, organizing, and reasoning about data;

(b)

apply numerical and graphical techniques for representing and summarizing data;

(c)

interpret and draw inferences from data and make decisions in a wide range of applied problem situations; and

(d)

help students understand quantitative and qualitative approaches to answering questions and develop students' abilities to communicate mathematically;

(6)

concepts of randomness and uncertainty:

(a)

probability as a way of describing chance in simple and compound events; and

(b)

the role of randomness and sampling in experimental studies;

(7)

mathematical processes:

(a)

know how to reason mathematically, solve problems, and communicate mathematics effectively at different levels of formality;

(b)

understand the connections among mathematical concepts and procedures, as well as their application to the real world;

(c)

understand the relationship between mathematics and other fields; and

(d)

understand and apply problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections; and

(8)

mathematical perspectives:

(a)

understand the history of mathematics and the interaction between different cultures and mathematics; and

(b)

know how to integrate technological and nontechnological tools with mathematics.

I.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental social studies concepts and the connections among them. The teacher must know and apply:

(1)

tools of inquiry and problem solving;

(2)

concepts of:

(a)

culture and cultural diversity;

(b)

the ways human beings view themselves in and over time;

(c)

the interaction between people, places, and environments;

(d)

individual development and identity;

(e)

interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions;

(f)

how people create and change structures of power and authority and of governance;

(g)

how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services and how those choices impact the environment;

(h)

the relationships among science, technology, and society;

(i)

global connections and independence; and

(j)

the ideals, principles, and practices that promote productive community involvement;

(3)

history, government, and culture of Minnesota-based American Indian tribes as integrating concepts throughout the elementary curriculum; and

(4)

the environment as an integrating concept through understanding of how to use the sciences, social sciences, mathematics, arts, and communications in the exploration of environmental issues and topics.

J.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate a fundamental knowledge of scientific perspectives, scientific connections, science in personal and social perspectives, the domains of science, and the methods and materials for teaching science and scientific inquiry. The teacher must:

(1)

understand science as a human endeavor, the nature of scientific knowledge, and the historical perspective of science;

(2)

know and apply the understandings and abilities of scientific inquiry including the ability to:

(a)

identify questions and concepts that can be explored through scientific inquiry;

(b)

design and conduct scientific investigations;

(c)

use appropriate scientific instrumentation and equipment and mathematics as tools to improve scientific investigations and communications;

(d)

compare the use of multiple types of inquiry for answering questions;

(e)

evaluate alternative explanations and models based on evidence, current scientific understanding, and logic; and

(f)

communicate and defend a scientific argument;

(3)

know how to make connections across the domains of science, between science and technology, and between science and other school subjects;

(4)

use scientific understandings and abilities when making decisions about personal and societal issues;

(5)

know and apply the fundamental concepts and principles of physical science concerning properties of and changes in matter; position, motion, and force; light, heat, electricity, and magnetism; and kinds of and ways to transfer energy;

(6)

know and apply the fundamental concepts and principles of life science concerning the characteristics of organisms, the life cycle of organisms, the interrelationships of organisms and environments, structure and function in living systems, reproduction and heredity, regulation and behavior, populations and ecosystems and their interrelationships, and diversity and adaptations of organisms;

(7)

know and apply the fundamental concepts and principles of earth and space science concerning properties of earth materials; objects in the sky; changes in earth and sky; structure of the earth system, including hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere; history of the earth; and earth in the solar system; and

(8)

know and apply pedagogy and classroom management in science and scientific inquiry including understanding:

(a)

content standards under chapter 3501 for recommendations regarding curriculum, instruction, assessment, professional development, and program development;

(b)

how to teach scientific inquiry in a developmentally appropriate manner;

(c)

common student misconceptions in science and developmentally appropriate strategies to elicit students' misconceptions and help them move to accepted scientific understandings; and

(d)

how to implement safe environments for learning science through knowing:

i.

state and national legal responsibilities and safety guidelines for teaching science;

ii.

how to establish and enforce recognized safety procedures during the science learning experience;

iii.

how to use required safety equipment for classroom, field, and laboratory settings including goggles, fire extinguisher, fire blanket, eye wash, and chemical shower;

iv.

how to manage, maintain, and utilize science supplies and equipment;

v.

state and national guidelines and plan for the care, storage, use, and disposal of chemicals and equipment used to teach science;

vi.

the ethics of and restrictions on making and maintaining collections of scientific specimens and data; and

vii.

the ethics of and restrictions on the use of live organisms, and how to acquire, care, handle, and dispose of organisms.

K.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental physical education and health concepts and the connections among them. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the knowledge needed for providing learning experiences that encourage personal and community health promotion, disease prevention and safety, and proper nutritional choices;

(2)

understand strategies for reducing and preventing accidents; drug, alcohol, and tobacco use; and high-risk situations and relationships;

(3)

understand and apply movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills; and

(4)

understand the knowledge needed for providing learning experiences that develop a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

L.

A teacher of children in kindergarten through grade 6 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental visual and performing arts, including music, dance, and theater, concepts and the connections among them. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the basic structural elements, principles, and vocabulary of the visual and performing arts;

(2)

be able to perform and create using the basic elements and processes of visual and performing arts;

(3)

know and apply within the elementary curriculum strategies for nurturing artistic modes of expression and thinking;

(4)

understand the role of visual and performing arts in culture; and

(5)

know the characteristics of children's developmental stages in the visual and performing arts.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach elementary students in kindergarten through grade 6 must have a variety of field experiences which must include at least 100 school-based hours prior to student teaching that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences at both the primary and intermediate elementary levels.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, 34 SR 595]

Subp. 5.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 6.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3300

[Repealed, 34 SR 595]

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.3310 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF COMMUNICATION ARTS AND LITERATURE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of communication arts and literature with a middle level endorsement license is authorized to teach students in grades 5 through 8 in any school organizational pattern.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of communication arts and literature shall:

A.

hold one or more of the following classroom teaching licenses granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board: a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, nonrenewable, or professional license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education;

B.

show verification of completing a preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to licensure in middle level teaching of communication arts and literature for grades 5 through 8 in subpart 3; and

C.

demonstrate completion of the equivalent of a college minor in communication arts and literature.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of communication arts and literature must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, items B and C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of middle level students understands the nature of early adolescence and the needs of young adolescents. The teacher must understand and apply:

(1)

the research base for and best practices of middle level education;

(2)

the educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of young adolescents;

(3)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young adolescents; and

(4)

the process and necessity of collaboration with families and other adults in support of the learning of young adolescents.

B.

A teacher of middle level students understands the teaching of an academic subject area that integrates understanding of the academic content with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of middle level students in grades 5 through 8 must:

(1)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of the academic specialty and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials that are appropriate for middle level students and are specific to the academic content area;

(2)

understand how to integrate curriculum across subject areas in developmentally appropriate ways;

(3)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(4)

understand the need for and how to connect student's schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(5)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(6)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(7)

understand the impact of reading ability on student achievement in the academic specialty, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read the academic specialty content more effectively.

C.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching communication arts and literature in grades 5 through 8 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts of communication arts and literature and the connections among them. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the literacy needs of young adolescents encompassing the need to comprehend narrative and technical writing; the need to successfully access available databases; the need to write at an interactive level, including a variety of personal formats; and the ability to interact on all cognitive levels through writing;

(2)

understand the importance of building student schema and metacognition in comprehending new information at higher levels of thinking;

(3)

possess the strategies and skills necessary to teach young adolescents how to use content area text structure as an aid to comprehension;

(4)

possess the ability to use authentic assessment practices for the evaluation of young adolescents' development in literacy skills;

(5)

possess the strategies and skills necessary to expand the vocabulary acquisition strategies of young adolescents as they grow in their literacy behaviors; and

(6)

possess the strategies and skills necessary to develop the reading and writing behaviors of young adolescents across a breadth of content areas.

D.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching communication arts and literature in grades 5 through 8 must demonstrate understanding and skills essential to the teaching and learning of reading, writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and literature. The teacher must demonstrate the:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction, including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relation between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success;

(2)

ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words, including domain-specific content words;

(d)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods, and match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(e)

implementation of a variety of grouping strategies that include individual, small group, and whole group reading experiences that promote enhanced comprehension of text; and

(f)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand language, arts, and texts, and spur student interest in more complex reading materials, including the ability to help students:

i.

distinguish fact from opinion and the words that signal opinions and judgments in persuasive texts;

ii.

think critically: draw inferences or conclusions from facts, analyze author's purpose and point of view, evaluate author's argument and evidence, and synthesize information from more than one text; and

iii.

use aids such as glossaries and appendixes that pertain to reading, writing, and English language conventions;

(3)

use of a variety of assessment practices to evaluate effective reading:

(a)

understand the measurement systems and proper interpretation of assessment tools that determine individual student's reading level, fluency, comprehension abilities, and reading interests;

(b)

use of data to set goals and objectives, make effective instructional decisions, and demonstrate responsiveness to student needs; and

(c)

the ability to communicate results of assessments to specific individuals in accurate and coherent ways that indicate how the results might impact student achievement.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach communication arts and literature in grades 5 through 8 must apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students in this academic subject by completing a minimum of a four-week student teaching experience in a middle level placement in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the elementary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 7 or 8. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the secondary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 5 or 6.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3320 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of mathematics with a middle level endorsement license is authorized to teach students in grades 5 through 8 in any school organizational pattern.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of mathematics shall:

A.

hold one or more of the following classroom teaching licenses granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board: a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, nonrenewable, or professional license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education;

B.

show verification of completing a preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to licensure in middle level teaching of mathematics for grades 5 through 8 in subpart 3; and

C.

demonstrate completion of the equivalent of a college minor in mathematics.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of mathematics must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, items B and C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of middle level students understands the nature of early adolescence and the needs of young adolescents. The teacher must understand and apply:

(1)

the research base for and best practices of middle level education;

(2)

the educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of young adolescents;

(3)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young adolescents; and

(4)

the process and necessity of collaboration with families and other adults in support of the learning of young adolescents.

B.

A teacher of middle level students understands the teaching of an academic subject area that integrates understanding of the academic content with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of middle level students in grades 5 through 8 must:

(1)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of the academic specialty and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials that are appropriate for middle level students and are specific to the academic content area;

(2)

understand how to integrate curriculum across subject areas in developmentally appropriate ways;

(3)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(4)

understand the need for and how to connect schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(5)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(6)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(7)

understand the impact of reading ability on achievement in the academic specialty, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read the academic specialty content more effectively.

C.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching mathematics in grades 5 through 8 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts of mathematics and the connections among them. The teacher must know and apply:

(1)

concepts of patterns, relations, and functions:

(a)

recognize, describe, and generalize patterns and build mathematical models to describe situations, solve problems, and make predictions;

(b)

analyze the interaction within and among quantities and variables to model patterns of change and use appropriate representations, including tables, graphs, matrices, words, algebraic expressions, and equations;

(c)

represent and solve problem situations that involve variable quantities and be able to use appropriate technology;

(d)

understand patterns present in number systems and apply these patterns to further investigations;

(e)

apply properties of boundedness and limits to investigate problems involving sequences and series; and

(f)

apply concepts of derivatives to investigate problems involving rates of change;

(2)

concepts of discrete mathematics:

(a)

application of discrete models to problem situations using appropriate representations, including sequences, finite graphs and trees, matrices, and arrays;

(b)

application of systematic counting techniques in problem situations to include determining the existence of a solution, the number of possible solutions, and the optimal solution;

(c)

application of discrete mathematics strategies including pattern searching; organization of information; sorting; case-by-case analysis; iteration and recursion; and mathematical induction to investigate, solve, and extend problems; and

(d)

exploration, development, analysis, and comparison of algorithms designed to accomplish a task or solve a problem;

(3)

concepts of number sense:

(a)

understand number systems; their properties; and relations, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers;

(b)

possess an intuitive sense of numbers including a sense of magnitude, mental mathematics, estimation, place value, and a sense of reasonableness of results;

(c)

possess a sense for operations, application of properties of operations, and the estimation of results;

(d)

be able to translate among equivalent forms of numbers to facilitate problem solving; and

(e)

be able to estimate quantities and evaluate the reasonableness of estimates;

(4)

concepts of shape and space:

(a)

shapes and the ways in which shape and space can be derived and described in terms of dimension, direction, orientation, perspective, and relationships among these properties;

(b)

spatial sense and the ways in which shapes can be visualized, combined, subdivided, and changed to illustrate concepts, properties, and relationships;

(c)

spatial reasoning and the use of geometric models to represent, visualize, and solve problems;

(d)

motion and the ways in which rotation, reflection, and translation of shapes can illustrate concepts, properties, and relationships;

(e)

formal and informal argument, including the processes of making assumptions; formulating, testing, and reformulating conjectures; justifying arguments based on geometric figures; and evaluating the arguments of others;

(f)

plane, solid, and coordinate geometry systems, including relations between coordinate and synthetic geometry and generalizing geometric principles from a two-dimensional system to a three-dimensional system;

(g)

attributes of shapes and objects that can be measured, including length, area, volume, capacity, size of angles, weight, and mass;

(h)

the structure of systems of measurement, including the development and use of measurement systems and the relationships among different systems; and

(i)

measuring, estimating, and using measurements to describe and compare geometric phenomena;

(5)

concepts of data investigations:

(a)

data and its power as a way to explore questions and issues;

(b)

investigation through data, including formulating a problem; devising a plan to collect data; and systematically collecting, recording, and organizing data;

(c)

data representation to describe data distributions, central tendency, and variance through appropriate use of graphs, tables, and summary statistics; and

(d)

analysis and interpretation of data, including summarizing data; and making or evaluating arguments, predictions, recommendations, or decisions based on an analysis of the data; and

(6)

concepts of randomness and uncertainty:

(a)

inference and the role of randomness and sampling in statistical claims about populations;

(b)

probability as a way to describe chance or risk in simple and compound events;

(c)

predicting outcomes based on exploration of probability through data collection, experiments, and simulations; and

(d)

predicting outcomes based on theoretical probabilities and comparing mathematical expectations with experimental results.

D.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching mathematics in grades 5 through 8 must understand the content and methods for teaching reading, including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction, including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relation between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success;

(2)

ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand math texts and spur interest in more complex reading materials, including:

i.

the density of ideas;

ii.

concepts that build within a chapter or across chapters;

iii.

use of equations to model life situations; asking students to create or restate, in words or sentences, the relations between symbols; and the situation being modeled;

iv.

text with diagrams and graphs; and

v.

use of different representations to aid in understanding the underlying mathematical concept, matching each representation to the learning styles of different individuals; and

(f)

model strategies for representing mathematical ideas in a variety of modes (literal, symbolic, graphic, digital), which includes asking students to restate symbolic representations (numerals, equations, and graphs), in words or sentences.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach mathematics in grades 5 through 8 must apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students in this academic subject by completing a minimum of a four-week student teaching experience in a middle level placement in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the elementary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 7 or 8. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the secondary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 5 or 6.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3330 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF SOCIAL STUDIES.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of social studies with a middle level endorsement license is authorized to teach students in grades 5 through 8 in any school organizational pattern.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of social studies shall:

A.

hold one or more of the following classroom teaching licenses granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board: a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, nonrenewable, or professional license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education;

B.

show verification of completing a preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to licensure in middle level teaching of social studies for grades 5 through 8 in subpart 3; and

C.

demonstrate completion of the equivalent of a college minor in social studies.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of social studies must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, items B and C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of middle level students understands the nature of early adolescence and the needs of young adolescents. The teacher must understand and apply:

(1)

the research base for and best practices of middle level education;

(2)

the educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of young adolescents;

(3)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young adolescents; and

(4)

the process and necessity of collaboration with families and other adults in support of the learning of young adolescents.

B.

A teacher of middle level students understands the teaching of an academic subject area that integrates understanding of the academic content with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of middle level students in grades 5 through 8 must:

(1)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of the academic specialty and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials that are appropriate for middle level students and are specific to the academic content area;

(2)

understand how to integrate curriculum across subject areas in developmentally appropriate ways;

(3)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(4)

understand the need for and how to connect schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(5)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(6)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(7)

understand the impact of reading ability on student achievement in the academic specialty, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read the academic specialty content more effectively.

C.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching social studies in grades 5 through 8 must demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts of the social studies disciplines and the connections among them. The teacher must know and apply:

(1)

concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time:

(a)

that different historians may describe the same event or situation in different ways;

(b)

key concepts including chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity;

(c)

processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past;

(d)

that historical perspectives are influenced by individual experiences, societal values, and critical traditions; and

(e)

how to use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues;

(2)

concepts of people, places, and environments;

(a)

how to map information in a spatial context and interpret the maps;

(b)

land forms and geographic features;

(c)

physical system changes, including seasons, climate and weather, and the water cycle, and identify geographic patterns associated with them;

(d)

physical and cultural patterns and their interactions, including land use, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas, and ecosystem changes; and

(e)

how historical events have been influenced by, and have influenced, physical and human geographic factors in local, regional, national, and global settings;

(3)

concepts of how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services:

(a)

how economic systems structure the production and distribution of goods and services;

(b)

the costs and benefits to society of allocating goods and services through private and public sectors;

(c)

a range of various institutions that make up economic systems, for example households, business firms, banks, and corporations;

(d)

how values and beliefs influence different economic decisions; and

(e)

how to use economic reasoning to compare different proposals for dealing with contemporary social issues;

(4)

concepts of ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic:

(a)

the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified;

(b)

the basic features of the political system in the United States;

(c)

the key ideals of the democratic republican form of government;

(d)

the process for becoming a citizen and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;

(e)

how to locate, access, analyze, organize, and apply information about selected public issues;

(f)

diverse forms of public opinion and the influence that various forms of citizen action have on public policy development and decision making; and

(g)

how various forms of citizen action can strengthen the common good; and

(5)

relationships among science, technology, and society:

(a)

how science and technology have changed people's perceptions of the social and natural world;

(b)

ways in which values, beliefs, and attitudes are influenced by new scientific and technological knowledge;

(c)

the need for laws and policies to govern scientific and technological applications; and

(d)

the need to seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific advancements and social norms or values come into conflict.

D.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching social studies in grades 5 through 8 must understand the content and methods for teaching reading, including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction, including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relation between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success; and

(2)

ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives;

(f)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods to match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(g)

the appropriate applications of a wide variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers in secondary school settings across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds; and

(h)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand social studies texts and spur interest in more complex reading materials, including the ability to help students:

i.

recognize fact and opinion and the words that signal opinions and judgments;

ii.

distinguish between primary and secondary sources, for example, historical record versus textbook;

iii.

think critically, for example, draw inferences or conclusions from facts, analyze author's purpose and point of view, discern cause and effect relationships, detect bias, and evaluate evidence;

iv.

use and interpret maps, globes, and other nonlinguistic or graphic tools such as timelines, photographs, charts, statistical tables, digital tools, and political cartoons; and

v.

use other texts features such as glossaries, indexes, detailed databases about countries, and appendixes of documents or maps.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach social studies in grades 5 through 8 must apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students in this academic subject by completing a minimum of a four-week student teaching experience in a middle level placement in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the elementary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 7 or 8. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the secondary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 5 or 6.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3340 MIDDLE LEVEL ENDORSEMENT LICENSE FOR TEACHERS OF GENERAL SCIENCE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of general science with a middle level endorsement license is authorized to teach students in grades 5 through 8 in any school organizational pattern.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of science shall:

A.

hold one or more of the following classroom teaching licenses granted by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board: a life license; a current nonvocational entrance, nonrenewable, or professional license; or a current entrance or continuing secondary vocational license based on a degree program in agriculture education, business education, consumer homemaking and family life education, industrial education, or marketing education;

B.

show verification of completing a preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to licensure in middle level teaching of science for grades 5 through 8 in subpart 3; and

C.

demonstrate completion of the equivalent of a college minor in science.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a middle level teacher of science must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, items B and C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of middle level students understands the nature of early adolescence and the needs of young adolescents. The teacher must understand and apply:

(1)

the research base for and best practices of middle level education;

(2)

the educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of young adolescents;

(3)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young adolescents; and

(4)

the process and necessity of collaboration with families and other adults in support of the learning of young adolescents.

B.

A teacher of middle level students understands the teaching of an academic subject area that integrates understanding of the academic content with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of middle level students in grades 5 through 8 must:

(1)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of the academic specialty and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials that are appropriate for middle level students and are specific to the academic content area;

(2)

understand how to integrate curriculum across subject areas in developmentally appropriate ways;

(3)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(4)

understand the need for and how to connect schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(5)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(6)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(7)

understand the impact of reading ability on achievement in the academic specialty, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read the academic specialty content more effectively.

C.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching science in grades 5 through 8 must meet the standards in part 8710.4750, subpart 3, items A to F.

D.

A teacher with a middle level endorsement for teaching science in grades 5 through 8 must understand the content and methods for teaching reading, including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction, including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relation between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success; and

(2)

ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives; and

(f)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods to match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers; and

(g)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand science texts, including the ability to:

i.

distinguish between facts based on empirical/scientific findings from opinion;

ii.

relate what is read to relevant prior knowledge;

iii.

use scientific knowledge to draw inferences or conclusions from facts, discern cause and effect relationships, detect fallacies in author's evidence, and support own claims with evidence;

iv.

follow instructions to perform laboratory activities step-by-step in a disciplined fashion;

v.

explain diagrams and graphs in terms of scientific content and meaning; and

vi.

explain meaning of abbreviations and symbols.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach general science in grades 5 through 8 must apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students in this academic subject by completing a minimum of a four-week student teaching experience in a middle level placement in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the elementary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 7 or 8. Candidates for licensure who hold a license at the secondary level must complete the student teaching experience with students in grade 5 or 6.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.3350 PREPRIMARY ENDORSEMENT LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher with a preprimary endorsement license is authorized to teach preprimary students age three through prekindergarten.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach preprimary students shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for beginning teachers under part 8710.2000; and

C.

hold or qualify for licensure in elementary education for kindergarten through grade six under part 8710.3200.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards.

A teacher of preprimary education valid for teaching preprimary students age three through prekindergarten must meet the standards in part 8710.3000, subpart 3, items A (preprimary only), C, J, K, L, and M (preprimary only).

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements of this part for licensure as a teacher of preprimary education for age three through prekindergarten are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.3360 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 8 WORLD LANGUAGE AND CULTURE ENDORSEMENT LICENSE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher with a world language and culture endorsement license is authorized to teach students in kindergarten through grade 8.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure in kindergarten through grade 8 world language and culture shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for beginning teachers under part 8710.2000; and

C.

hold or apply and qualify for licensure in elementary education for kindergarten through grade 6 under part 8710.3200.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards.

A teacher of world language and culture in kindergarten through grade 8 must meet the standards for licensure of teachers of world languages and cultures in part 8710.4950, subparts 3 and 6, 4 and 6, or 5 and 6.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to this chapter.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements of this part for licensure as a teacher of world language and culture in kindergarten through grade 8 are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

34 SR 595

Published Electronically:

November 19, 2009

8710.4000 TEACHERS OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of adult basic education is authorized to provide to learners who are 16 years of age or over and are not enrolled in elementary or secondary schools instruction that is designed to develop mastery of basic education skills including English language skills. This part shall not prohibit a school board from employing a teacher who holds a valid Minnesota classroom teaching license but who is not licensed as a teacher of adult basic education to teach adult basic education. A license under this part does not qualify a teacher to provide instruction leading to a high school diploma.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach adult basic education shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of adult basic education in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of adult basic education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to I.

A.

A teacher of adult basic education must understand adult basic education organizational structure:

(1)

the history and philosophy of adult basic education including its purposes, mission, and populations to be served;

(2)

federal and state adult basic education legislation, policies, and regulatory agencies including sources of funding; and

(3)

systems of delivering adult education programs and services.

B.

A teacher of adult education must understand adult learning theories:

(1)

characteristics common to all adult learners as well as those common to unique populations;

(2)

contemporary strategies and models for teaching adults; and

(3)

formal and informal diagnostic procedures, including self-assessment, for identifying the academic and personal needs of adult learners and how to use this information as the basis for customizing the curriculum so as to meet their needs.

C.

A teacher of adult education must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relationship between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives; and

(f)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods to match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers.

D.

A teacher of adult education must understand the content and methods for teaching mathematics:

(1)

mathematical concepts and the procedures and connections between them including:

(a)

basic mathematics processes including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division;

(b)

basic mathematics systems of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages;

(c)

estimation of quantities and the evaluation of the reasonableness of estimates;

(d)

systems of measurement and their use; and

(e)

constructing, reading, interpreting, and making inferences from tables, charts, and graphs;

(2)

mathematical problem-solving techniques and strategies; and

(3)

how to teach mathematics contextually to reflect actual uses using real world materials and situations that build on the adult learner's prior knowledge.

E.

A teacher of adult education must understand the content and methods for teaching listening and speaking:

(1)

the listening process and how to receive, attend to, interpret, and respond appropriately to verbal messages and other cues;

(2)

ways of constructing meaning for participation in formal and informal speaking situations so students can organize ideas and use different verbal and nonverbal communication styles;

(3)

how to teach listening and speaking contextually to reflect actual uses using real world materials and situations that build on the adult learner's prior knowledge; and

(4)

how to adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of adult learners whose first language is not English.

F.

A teacher of adult education must understand the content and methods for teaching writing:

(1)

the stages of the writing process;

(2)

multiple strategies to assess and respond to student writing;

(3)

the principles and formats of communicating thoughts, ideas, information, and messages appropriately and effectively in written English; and

(4)

how to teach writing contextually so as to reflect actual uses using real world materials and situations that build on the adult learner's prior knowledge.

G.

A teacher of adult education must understand the content and methods for teaching application skills:

(1)

the higher order thinking skills of thinking critically, solving problems, and making decisions;

(2)

effective interpersonal and group participation; and

(3)

understanding how to learn.

H.

A teacher of adult basic education must understand career development and transition skills:

(1)

the culture of the contemporary workplace and the changing nature of job skills;

(2)

the process of accessing information and resources of jobs and training;

(3)

the career decision-making process; and

(4)

the skills necessary to find and keep a job.

I.

A teacher of adult basic education must understand adult teaching and learning:

(1)

factors for selecting and techniques for using materials and resources in adult education programming;

(2)

formal and informal diagnostic procedures for identifying the academic and personal needs of adult learners and how to use this information to develop competency-based instruction for individuals, small groups, and large groups;

(3)

strategies for learners to assess their own progress; and

(4)

factors to consider in developing unique curricula for specialized adult populations.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach adult basic education must apply the standards of effective practice in teaching adult students through a series of formal observations and directed instructional experiences with adults participating in adult basic education programs totaling at least 100 hours and including at least two written evaluations by faculty supervisors.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4050 TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of agricultural education is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop the student's literacy in the food, fiber, and natural resources systems, the agricultural applications of the concepts, and the interdisciplinary nature of science; and to assist students to develop agricultural and agriculture-related career perspectives and workplace skills.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach agricultural education to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of agricultural education in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of agricultural education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to M.

A.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the anatomy, taxonomy, physiology, and ecology of plants and the application of the principles of genetics, propagation, selection, culture, and use of plants in agronomy, horticulture, or forestry.

B.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the anatomy and physiology of animals; the application of principles of genetics, breeding, selection, nutrition, care and health of animals for use in production, companionship, and recreation; and other contemporary issues that include ethics and waste management.

C.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the principles and practices of ecology and conservation in the areas of air, water, land, and wildlife flora and fauna; the principles and practices of soils and soil management; and the interactions of humans in natural and managed environments.

D.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the principles of economics; business and resource management; sales and marketing of commodities and services; and managerial accounting and bookkeeping procedures.

E.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the principles and practices of mechanical systems that include fluid, electrical, and fuel-powered units; the design, fabrication, construction, and use of agricultural structures, equipment, and systems; alternative energy sources, including wind, solar, and geothermal energy; measuring tools and equipment; and product storage, water management, waste management, and materials handling.

F.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the selection and use of technology appropriate to the industry.

G.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the production, processing, preservation, packaging, storage, marketing, and distribution of dairy products, meats, fruits and vegetables, textiles, and wood products; and have knowledge of the laws, regulations, and issues affecting food and fiber quality and safety.

H.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the diversity of agriculture; population and cultural impact on world economics and trade; and productive capacity, productive potential, and comparative advantage.

I.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the principles and practices of leadership and communication that apply to organizations and community settings; role and structure of the student organization as an integral curricular component; and integration of the role and structure of the student organizations in developing the student through individual, cooperative, and collaborative activities that prepare the student for a role in the school, community, and workplace.

J.

Through regular employment, internship, mentorship, job shadowing, or apprenticeship, a teacher of agricultural education must understand the function and operation of:

(1)

businesses that supply goods and services to agriculture and agricultural-related enterprises; production units; and businesses that process, market, and distribute agricultural-related products; and

(2)

diverse natural resources occupations, including recreational, conservation, and related occupations.

K.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the principles and practices of career planning and development that incorporates the role of career exploration in the process.

L.

A teacher of agricultural education must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of agriculture that integrates agriculture with pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development to:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of agricultural education; and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of agricultural education;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

M.

A teacher of agricultural education must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relationship between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge; and

(d)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success;

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words, including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers; and

(f)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(3)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words; and

(c)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach agricultural education must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4100 TEACHERS OF AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGE, HISTORY, AND CULTURE.

Subpart 1.

Issuance of license authorized.

The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board shall, under this part and Minnesota Statutes, section 126.49, authorize the issuance of a license to teach American Indian language, history, and culture to an applicant who has achieved and demonstrated competence in an American Indian language or knowledge and understanding of American Indian history and culture.

Subp. 2.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of American Indian language, history, and culture is authorized to teach an American Indian language or an American Indian history and culture to students in kindergarten through grade 12. This part shall not prohibit a school board from employing a person to teach an American Indian language or American Indian history and culture who does not hold a license under this part.

Subp. 3.

License requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach American Indian language, history, and culture shall submit an application that:

A.

specifies the American Indian language or history and culture to be taught;

B.

includes certified copies of two resolutions attesting to the applicant's competence in an American Indian language or the knowledge and understanding of an American Indian history and culture. One of the resolutions must be from the tribal government governing the tribe or community speaking the language or representing the history and culture for which licensure is requested with the second resolution being from one of subitems (1) to (4):

(1)

another reservation or business committee serving the tribe or community speaking the language or representing the history and culture for which licensure is requested;

(2)

the local Indian education committee serving the tribe or community speaking the language or representing the history and culture for which licensure is requested;

(3)

other bodies governing or serving the tribe or community speaking the language or representing the history and culture; or

(4)

authorized officials of professional or learned societies, organizations, or institutions who are qualified to assess the applicant's competence in an American Indian language or the knowledge and understanding of the applicant of the American Indian history and culture.

The resolution shall confirm that the applicant has been assessed and is competent in the language to be taught or possesses knowledge and understanding of the American Indian history and culture to be taught.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of American Indian language, history, and culture are effective on September 1, 2001, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4150 TEACHERS OF BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher holding a bilingual/bicultural license is authorized to teach the academic content in the students' native or first language at the grade levels defined by the prerequisite classroom teacher license in subpart 2, item B. Bilingual/bicultural education licensure is required when the teaching assignment focuses on providing academic content instruction to English learners in their native or first language for the purposes of gaining access to the curriculum through instruction of academic content in the students' native or first language and developing both the students' native or first language and English language skills.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate recommended for licensure to teach bilingual/bicultural education shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

hold a valid Minnesota elementary education or a grade 5 through 12 or grade 7 through 12 license in mathematics, a science field, social studies, or health education;

C.

demonstrate oral and written proficiency in the students' native or first language as described in subpart 3;

D.

demonstrate the standards of effective practice for teaching in part 8710.2000; and

E.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to licensure of teachers of bilingual/bicultural education under subpart 4.

Subp. 3.

Demonstration of oral and written proficiency.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of bilingual/bicultural education shall demonstrate oral and written proficiency in the students' native or first language under item A or B.

A.

The candidate shall verify the completion of a high school or postsecondary education using the students' native or first language as the means of oral and written communication.

B.

The candidate shall demonstrate an advanced level of oral proficiency as defined in the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and an advanced level writing proficiency as defined in this part. The written language proficiency does not apply to a candidate for licensure whose first or native language is a language that is not commonly communicated in written form by native speakers of that language.

A candidate who has an advanced level of written proficiency is able to write routine social correspondence and join sentences in simple discourse of at least several paragraphs in length on familiar topics; write simple social correspondence, take notes, write cohesive summaries and resumes, and narratives and descriptions of a factual nature; use sufficient writing vocabulary to express self simply with some circumlocution; make few errors in punctuation, spelling, or the formation of nonalphabetic symbols; and demonstrate good control of the morphology and the most frequently used syntactic structures; for example, common word order patterns, coordination, and subordination.

Subp. 4.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of bilingual/bicultural education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item E, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to I.

A.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher demonstrates an understanding of the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand basic phonology of language;

(2)

understand grammatical concepts that are applicable to dual language instruction;

(3)

compare and contrast English with another language;

(4)

understand word forms and their contribution to the lexicon in English and other languages;

(5)

understand the multiple perspectives of language learners who share a common first language but come from a number of different cultural backgrounds; and

(6)

understand how to promote proficiency in two languages.

B.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher understands the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition process. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand the processes of and differences between first and second language acquisition;

(2)

understand the similarities and differences between child and adult language acquisition;

(3)

understand individual variation in language development of the first and second language;

(4)

understand that making errors is part of the natural language acquisition process; and

(5)

develop and use curricula that demonstrates an understanding of first and second language acquisition.

C.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher demonstrates an understanding of the history of bilingual education and the cultures represented in the United States and other countries. This includes a solid understanding of the foundations of bilingual education. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand cultural pluralism in the United States and the relationships between the majority and minority groups;

(2)

be knowledgeable about the cultures of the United States and how these cultures interrelate in the global context;

(3)

know about the history and development of bilingual education in the United States;

(4)

understand the historical contributions of bilingual educators and advocates who have facilitated development of the field;

(5)

understand the contributions of the various communities and the importance of family and community participation in education; and

(6)

understand the various bilingual education program models and the implications for implementation.

D.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment techniques to evaluate the progress of English learners. This understanding includes using two languages for assessment purposes. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must understand:

(1)

entrance, exiting, and monitoring procedures for determining the readiness of English learners for academic mainstreaming;

(2)

the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment instruments and techniques in assessing English learners;

(3)

the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal academic assessment instruments and techniques in assessing English learners;

(4)

item and test construction methods appropriate to the learning needs of English learners including a thorough knowledge of dual language assessment;

(5)

how to administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized and alternative methods of assessment to English learners, parents, and colleagues;

(6)

measurement theory and assessment-related issues including validity, reliability, linguistic, and cultural bias, and scoring concerns;

(7)

that ongoing assessment is essential to the instructional process and recognize that many different assessment strategies are necessary for monitoring and promoting an English learner's learning; and

(8)

the limitations of using traditional special education assessment procedures in the identification and placement of English learners in special education programs.

E.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher understands the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as being essential to student achievement in all academic areas. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand the differences between literacy development in the first language and second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners;

(2)

recognize the critical role of language in fostering identity and self-esteem;

(3)

understand how cultural and linguistic differences influence communication; and

(4)

understand the variation in communication styles of English learners from diverse cultural backgrounds.

F.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher demonstrates the ability to communicate successfully with students, parents, and members of various cultural groups in the community. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must understand:

(1)

the social structures of diverse cultural groups represented in the bilingual education classroom;

(2)

schools as organizations within the larger community and how to communicate successfully with English learners and their parents within the larger cultural framework;

(3)

how factors in the English learners' environment that include family circumstances, community status, health, and economic conditions may influence learning; and

(4)

the legal issues evolving the education of English learners.

G.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher understands and facilitates content-based language instruction as a means to provide integrated learning experiences for English learners. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand the major concepts, assumptions, and processes of inquiry that are central to the academic content areas that are taught;

(2)

understand the connection between language proficiency and learning subject matter content;

(3)

understand the importance of building relationships with content area specialists in order to facilitate the acquisition of content knowledge by English learners; and

(4)

develop and use curricula and instructional approaches that enable English learners to acquire content understandings and skills.

H.

The bilingual/bicultural education teacher models correct usage of the English language. The teacher must demonstrate an advanced level of speaking proficiency as defined in the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines as established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

I.

A bilingual/bicultural education teacher understands and uses a variety of methods and materials suitable for teaching diverse bilingual education learners. The bilingual/bicultural education teacher must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of the bilingual/bicultural education and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process;

(8)

understand how English learners construct knowledge, acquire skills, and develop proficiency in both social and academic setting;

(9)

understand the importance of using multiple forms of instructional approaches to address the different learning styles, background experiences, and performance modes of English learners;

(10)

know how to create, select, and adapt learning materials to meet the dual language needs of English learners in a school setting;

(11)

understand the developmental progression and range of individual variation that can be expected of English learners in the context in which taught;

(12)

know when and how to access appropriate services to meet exceptional learning needs beyond the scope of the bilingual education program; and

(13)

apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students in kindergarten through grade 8 or in grades 5 through 12 through a variety of early and ongoing experiences within a range of educational programming models.

Subp. 5.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 6.

Incorporation by reference.

For the purposes of this part, the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines published in 1986 by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, 6 Executive Plaza, Yonkers, NY 10701-6801, and subsequent editions are incorporated by reference. The guidelines are not subject to frequent change and are available from the State Law Library.

Subp. 7.

Effective date.

The requirements of this part for licensure as a teacher of bilingual/bicultural education are effective on September 1, 2001, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4200 TEACHERS OF BUSINESS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of business is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop understanding of the functional areas of business including management, sales and marketing, finance, accounting, human resources, and information systems; the factors that affect business including economics, international business, business law, and technology; and the personal and work skills of communications and interpersonal relations, data interpretation and management, computation, collaboration and group process, and career development and transitions.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach business to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8700.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of business in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of business must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to F.

A.

A teacher of business has an integrated understanding of the functional areas of business from the perspective of the consumer, the employee, the business manager, and the entrepreneur. The teacher of business must understand:

(1)

business organization and management, including the functions of management; historical and contemporary management theories; characteristics and the advantages and disadvantages of the major forms of business organizations; organizational structures and principles; the role of ethics in management; the impact and relationship of government regulations and community involvement to business management decisions; and the role of organized labor and its influence on government and business;

(2)

sales and marketing, including roles of marketing and the impact of marketing on the individual, business, and society; the role and application of ethics in marketing; external factors that influence or dictate marketing decisions; product development and forecasting principles and methods for determining sales potential; role of pricing in the marketing process and the use of various pricing strategies; distribution processes and methods in developing distribution plans; general forms of promotion and how each contributes to successful marketing; market research development, implementation, and evaluation; marketing variables and strategies in dealing with a diversified marketplace; the components of a comprehensive marketing plan; principles of selling and merchandising; and the function of retailing and wholesaling;

(3)

financing, including the influence of internal and external factors, including stock market implications, on corporate financial data and how this data is used to make long-term and short-term management decisions; traditional sources for securing financing; the relationships among price, market share, and profitability; personal financial resource management and how more individual wants and needs can be satisfied by wise consumer decision making; the functions of commercial paper, insurance, secured transactions, and bankruptcy; the role of credit and the impact of long-term and short-term credit; and different types of budget processes;

(4)

accounting, including the accounting cycle and the purposes of each component of the cycle, methods for determining the value of assets, liabilities, and owner's equity according to generally accepted accounting principles and when and why they are used; how to prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements using manual and computerized systems for service, merchandising, and manufacturing businesses; and the use of planning and control principles to evaluate the performance of an organization and apply differential analysis and present value concepts to make decisions;

(5)

business information systems, including entry-level career expertise in the use of office technology and can explain the purpose, functions, and common features of contemporary office technology including:

(a)

computer technology including fundamentals of contemporary computer architecture and touch keyboarding skills to enter and manipulate text and data through word processing, database, spreadsheet, desktop publishing, and presentation graphics software;

(b)

multimedia and imaging technology;

(c)

telecommunications technology; and

(d)

the impact of information systems on society; and

(6)

human resources, including the activities of human resources management, its importance to the successful operation of an organization, and the role and importance of employment law as related to the conduct of business in the national and international marketplace.

B.

A teacher of business has a fundamental and integrated understanding of the factors that affect business from the perspective of the consumer, the employee, the business manager, and the entrepreneur. The teacher of business must understand:

(1)

economic fundamentals, including:

(a)

the role of competitive markets and the price mechanism in the production, distribution, and allocation of scarce resources, including human, capital, technological, and natural within the United States economy;

(b)

how the basic economic concepts of scarcity, opportunity cost, and trade-off influence the production, allocation, and consumption of goods and services in businesses and households, and the formulation of government domestic and international economic policy;

(c)

the linkages between gross domestic production, consumption, investment and savings, employment levels, inflation, international trade, and government policy on taxation and spending;

(d)

how the Federal Reserve System acts as our nation's central bank to promote a safe, sound money supply and how it initiates and effectuates the monetary system to allow for noninflationary economic growth;

(e)

alternative economic systems, and the philosophical assumptions supporting these alternative systems; and

(f)

the importance of, and economic interdependencies that exist in the global economy in relation to world trade, investment, and monetary flows;

(2)

international business fundamentals, including:

(a)

the role of international business and its impact on careers and doing business at the local, state, national, and international levels;

(b)

communication strategies and ethics necessary and appropriate for effective and profitable international business relations;

(c)

the role, importance, and basic concepts of international finance and risk management, international marketing, and balance of trade concepts; and

(d)

the social, cultural, political, legal, and economic factors that shape and impact the international business environment;

(3)

business law fundamentals, including:

(a)

the relationship between ethics and the law;

(b)

the sources of the law, structure of the court system, and different classifications of procedural and substantive law;

(c)

the relationships among contract law, law of sales, and consumer law;

(d)

the legal rules that apply to personal property and real property;

(e)

how advances in computer technology impact property law, contract law, criminal law, and international law; and

(f)

the role and importance of agency law and employment law as they relate to the conduct of business in the national and international marketplaces;

(4)

technology concepts that are of lasting value rather than mastery of specific hardware or software skills and knowledge, including:

(a)

understanding the fundamentals of current and emerging technological concepts including types, transmissions, storage, and display systems; and

(b)

the ability to examine the technological issues from a variety of perspectives including appropriate use, privacy, ethics, remaining current, access, and economic advantages and disadvantages.

C.

A teacher of business demonstrates the following essential workplace skills and understands how to create learning experiences that make this content meaningful to students. The teacher of business must demonstrate:

(1)

communication and interpersonal skills including the ability to:

(a)

understand how to approach communication from a systems perspective including cultural, organizational, technological, and interpersonal perspectives and how to use the system perspective to analyze and direct the choice of communication strategies and forms;

(b)

communicate in a clear, courteous, concise, and correct manner using oral communication skills, informational reading skills, written communication skills, and effective listening skills; and

(c)

apply effective human relations and interpersonal skills;

(2)

data interpretation and management skills, including the ability to acquire, evaluate, organize, maintain, and interpret and communicate information using both manual and computer technology;

(3)

computational skills, including the ability to:

(a)

use mathematical procedures to analyze and solve business problems for areas, including taxation; savings and investments; payroll records; cash management; financial statements; credit management; purchases; inventory records; depreciation, cost-recovery, and depletion; and

(b)

construct, read, and interpret and make inferences from tables, charts, and graphs;

(4)

collaboration and group process skills, including the ability to understand a holistic perspective, develop and communicate group goals, understand the role of the individual in groups, and interpret and process feedback within groups; and

(5)

career development and transition skills, including the ability to understand and apply career development theory, the job procurement process, and all forms of communication used in the successful pursuit of a career.

D.

A teacher of business understands occupational clusters within business, marketing, and information management sufficient to:

(1)

enable students to develop a perspective of career options in the business fields of management, sales and marketing, accounting and finance, information systems, or office management and administrative support;

(2)

gain understanding of the basic purposes, issues, skills, nature of work, and major concepts that undergird employment in one or more occupations centrally associated with applying academic business content;

(3)

establish activities that allow students to understand individual work in the context of broader business goals;

(4)

organize instruction that enables students to more effectively learn how to acquire skills, gain a perspective on a career, and embark on the first job; and

(5)

understand the unique characteristics of an entrepreneur and the special skills of entrepreneurship associated with starting, owning, and managing a business.

E.

A teacher of business must be able to integrate understanding business with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning environments, and professional development. The teacher of business to preadolescent and adolescent students must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

know how to develop curriculum goals based on the central concepts of the business and how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand key legislation germane to business education and school-to-work transition programming;

(6)

understand fiscal, budgetary, and purchasing practices that focus on how to organize and equip an effective and efficient classroom including selecting and maintaining instructional materials, supplies, furniture, and technology that are consistent with the current program standards;

(7)

understand the need for and how to connect student secondary schooling experiences with the workplace or further educational opportunities;

(8)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(9)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular business activities in the teaching and learning process;

(10)

know how to access information relevant to the field of business through consumer, business, and professional organizations, publications, and journals;

(11)

know strategies for marketing the business education program, including student recruitment and retention techniques and practices; and

(12)

know how to develop and apply evaluative criteria for a business curriculum and a plan for continuous improvement.

F.

A teacher of business must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

the relationships between and among print and digital content processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(b)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(c)

the ability to understand a variety of purposes for reading texts: process, information, and aesthetic; and

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach business education must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4250 TEACHERS OF COMMUNICATION ARTS AND LITERATURE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of communication arts and literature is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop skills and understanding in reading, writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and literature.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach communication arts and literature to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of communication arts and literature in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of communication arts and literature must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to C.

A.

A teacher of communication arts and literature understands central concepts common to the teaching and learning of communication arts and literature content. The teacher must understand and apply:

(1)

language development, cognition, and learning;

(2)

the phonological, grammatical, and semantic functions of language;

(3)

philosophy and theories of communication arts and literature instruction;

(4)

technological resources including software, databases, and networks that can be used to gather, synthesize, create, and communicate knowledge;

(5)

language for independent learning and enjoyment;

(6)

communication which is clear, fluent, strategic, critical, and creative;

(7)

the aesthetic dimensions of communication arts and literature;

(8)

strategies that allow appropriate engagement in communication tasks for a variety of purposes and audiences;

(9)

the integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing;

(10)

strategies for selecting and using texts and materials that correlate individual student abilities with developmentally appropriate learning experiences;

(11)

strategies for selecting and using texts and materials which recognize and accept a broad range of common and diverse perspectives;

(12)

research methods encompassing content;

(13)

the social, intellectual, and political importance and impact of communication;

(14)

the meanings of messages, content and relational;

(15)

communication and its value in exploring and expressing ideas; and

(16)

communication arts and literature activities such as forensics, debate, journalism, literary journals, and related activities.

B.

A teacher of communication arts and literature demonstrates understanding and skills essential to the teaching and learning of reading, writing, speaking, listening, media literacy, and literature. The teacher must demonstrate the:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relationship between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success;

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(d)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials, print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(e)

implementation of a variety of grouping strategies that include individual, small group, and whole group reading experiences that promote enhanced comprehension of text; and

(f)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand language arts texts and spur student interest in more complex reading materials, including the ability to help students:

i.

distinguish fact from opinion and the words that signal opinions and judgments in persuasive texts;

ii.

think critically, draw inferences or conclusions from facts, analyze author's purpose and point of view, evaluate author's argument and evidence, and synthesize information from more than one text; and

iii.

use aids such as glossaries and appendices that pertain to reading, writing, and English language conventions;

(3)

use of a variety of assessment practices to place and evaluate effective reading including:

(a)

understanding the measurement systems and proper interpretation of assessment tools that determine individual student's reading level, fluency, comprehension abilities, and reading interests;

(b)

using data to set goals and objectives, make effective instructional decisions, and demonstrate responsiveness to students' needs; and

(c)

the ability to communicate results of assessments to specific individuals in accurate and coherent ways that indicate how the results might impact students' achievement;

(4)

knowledge, skills, and ability to teach writing including:

(a)

various stages of the writing process, including prewriting, writing, conferencing, revising, and publishing used in teaching writing;

(b)

diverse strategies for assessing and responding to student writing;

(c)

the functions of language and how they influence effective written communication; and

(d)

conventions for presenting, arranging, and organizing information in particular genres or media;

(5)

knowledge, skills, and ability to teach speaking including:

(a)

relationships among the verbal and nonverbal components of the speaking process across a variety of contexts including small group, interpersonal, and public;

(b)

methods and steps necessary to construct meaning for participants in both formal and informal speaking situations;

(c)

methods of managing and overcoming communication anxiety and apprehension; and

(d)

ethical responsibilities of a speaker associated with competent and effective communication in society;

(6)

knowledge, skills, and ability to teach listening including:

(a)

relationships between and among the components of the listening process;

(b)

the different listening skills appropriate for diverse types and levels of listening;

(c)

how to identify and manage barriers to listening; and

(d)

ethical responsibilities of a listener;

(7)

knowledge, skills, and ability to teach media literacy including:

(a)

relationships among the elements of the communication process across various types of print and nonprint media;

(b)

effects of the various types of electronic audiovisual media on the communication process;

(c)

competent participation as a consumer and producer of media communication; and

(d)

functional, aesthetic, and ethical values of media communication; and

(8)

knowledge, skills, and ability to teach literature including:

(a)

a repertoire of literary texts, including fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works, and works written for preadolescents and adolescents by a diversity of authors;

(b)

characteristics of various literary genres, including poetry, drama, novel, short story, and essays;

(c)

tools of interpretation including literary devices, critical theories, and various methods of analysis, interpretation, presentation, and evaluation of literature;

(d)

how to help students respond to, interpret, and evaluate texts in a variety of ways, including text centered and reader centered approaches;

(e)

how to encourage students to respond to texts through written and oral communication, both privately and publicly;

(f)

how to help students construct meaning out of texts through various processes applied before, during, and after reading;

(g)

how context shapes meaning; and

(h)

how to encourage students to become lifelong readers and writers.

C.

A teacher of communication arts and literature demonstrates an understanding of the teaching of communication arts and literature that integrates understanding of communication arts and literature with their understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of communication arts and literature to preadolescent and adolescent students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of communication arts and literature and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach communication arts and literature must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4300 TEACHERS OF DANCE AND THEATRE ARTS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of dance and theatre arts education is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop an understanding of the creative works and the process of producing dance and theatre art forms.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach dance and theatre arts to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of dance and theatre arts in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of dance and theatre arts must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A, B, and D or A, C, and D.

A.

All teachers of dance and theatre arts education must demonstrate competency in:

(1)

choreography, improvisation, and in one dance movement genre in the context of performance opportunities;

(2)

the theory and practice of acting and directing in the context of performance opportunities;

(3)

the theory and practice in technical production and creative technology of dance and theater in the context of performance opportunities;

(4)

teaching methods and instructional content of creative dance and creative dramatics;

(5)

comparing and contrasting and using materials, elements, and modes of expression, production, and communication that support the processes of creation, analysis and interpretation, performance or exhibition, inquiry, and creative technology in all the arts;

(6)

comparing and contrasting ways of knowing in the arts with ways of knowing in the humanities, the sciences, and other subject areas; and

(7)

analyzing the economics and career opportunities of arts creation, performance, analysis, and creative technology.

B.

A teacher of dance and theatre arts with a dance specialization must demonstrate competency in:

(1)

a selected core dance movement genre through performance or concert opportunities;

(2)

a second dance movement genre in the context of reflective performance opportunities;

(3)

choreography and improvisation through performance or concert opportunities;

(4)

critical analysis and interpretation of the technical and choreographic aspects of performance;

(5)

the historical and aesthetic development of dance in diverse cultures;

(6)

contemporary technological principles, concepts, and tools and communicating the environmental and ethical issues concerning creative technology in dance; and

(7)

analyzing the functional, expressive, and health aspects of the human body.

C.

A teacher of dance and theatre arts with a theatre specialization must demonstrate competency in:

(1)

the theories and practices of acting through performance opportunities;

(2)

the theories and practices of stage direction through performance opportunities;

(3)

the process and techniques of creating a dramatic text;

(4)

the critical analysis and interpretation of theater performance;

(5)

contemporary technological principles, concepts, and tools and communicating the environmental and ethical issues concerning creative technology in theatre;

(6)

the historical and aesthetic development of theater in diverse cultures; and

(7)

communicating and understanding the dramatic literature of diverse cultures.

D.

A teacher of dance and theatre arts must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of dance and theatre arts that integrates understanding of dance and theatre arts with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of dance and theatre arts shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of theatre and dance and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of these disciplines;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' academic experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(8)

understand the impact of reading ability on student achievement in dance and theatre studies, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read dance and theatre arts content more effectively.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach dance and theater arts must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4310 TEACHERS OF DANCE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of dance is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop an understanding of the creative works and processes of producing dance.

Subp. 2.

Licensure.

A candidate for licensure to teach dance to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of dance in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of dance must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A and B.

A.

All teachers of dance must demonstrate competency in:

(1)

theories and practices of at least two dance forms in the context of performance;

(2)

theories and practices of choreography in the context of performance;

(3)

theories and practices of improvisation as applied to choreography and performance;

(4)

analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of technique, performance, and choreographic aspects of dance;

(5)

understanding theories and practices of dance in diverse cultures and historical periods;

(6)

theories and practices of design and technical production in dance in the context of performance;

(7)

understanding human anatomy and physiology, and health and safety practices related to dance;

(8)

theories and practices of creative dance;

(9)

understanding ethical issues in dance;

(10)

comparing and contrasting the processes of creating, performing, and responding in dance with the processes and content in other arts areas;

(11)

comparing and contrasting the processes of creating, performing, and responding in dance with the processes and content in the humanities, the sciences, and other subject areas; and

(12)

analyzing the economics and career opportunities of dance creation, performance, analysis, and technology.

B.

A teacher of dance must demonstrate integration of content with an understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of dance shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of dance and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student standards in dance;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' academic experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(8)

understand the impact of reading ability on student achievement in dance studies, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read dance content more effectively.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach dance must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

30 SR 1054; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4320 TEACHERS OF THEATRE ARTS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of theatre arts is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop an understanding of the creative works and processes of producing theatre.

Subp. 2.

Licensure.

A candidate for licensure to teach theatre arts to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of theatre in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of theatre arts must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A and B.

A.

All teachers of theatre arts must demonstrate competency in:

(1)

theories and practices of acting in the context of performance, including movement and voice;

(2)

theories and practices of directing in the context of performance;

(3)

theories and practices of design and technical production in theatre in the context of performance;

(4)

theories and practices of creative dramatics and improvisation;

(5)

processes and techniques of creating dramatic texts;

(6)

analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of theatre texts and performances;

(7)

understanding ethical issues in theatre;

(8)

understanding theories, practices, and literature of theatre in diverse cultures and historical periods;

(9)

comparing and contrasting the processes of creating, performing, and responding in theatre with the processes and content in other arts areas;

(10)

comparing and contrasting the processes of creating, performing, and responding in theatre with the processes and content in the humanities, the sciences, and other subject areas; and

(11)

analyzing the economics and career opportunities of theatre creation, performance, analysis, and technology.

B.

A teacher of theatre arts must demonstrate integration of content with an understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of theatre shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of theatre and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student standards in theatre;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' academic experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process; and

(8)

understand the impact of reading ability on student achievement in theatre studies, recognize the varying reading comprehension and fluency levels represented by students, and possess the strategies to assist students to read theatre content more effectively.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach theater arts must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

30 SR 1054; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4350 TEACHERS OF DRIVER AND TRAFFIC SAFETY.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of driver and traffic safety is authorized to provide to students 15 years of age or older instruction that is designed to develop the skills and understanding essential for acquiring a Minnesota driver's license.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach driver and traffic safety shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of driver and traffic safety in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of driver and traffic safety must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to L. The teacher must understand:

A.

traffic safety problems;

B.

the complexities of the driving task;

C.

the research base for and the best practices of teaching driver and traffic safety including strategies for teaching in a laboratory environment;

D.

the needs of the new driver as they relate to the organization of classroom and laboratory phases of driver and traffic safety programs in light of contemporary knowledge of adolescent development, psychology, and culture;

E.

the components that contribute to the effective design and delivery of the behind-the-wheel phase of driver and traffic safety, including a properly equipped vehicle, an established route, route selection, and entry and exit level assessments of student understandings and skills;

F.

the strengths and limitations of various forms of laboratory instruction specific to driver and traffic safety, including behind-the-wheel, multiple vehicle driving range, and simulation, and their application in designing and delivering this instruction;

G.

the origins of driver and traffic safety programs and major milestones in the history of driver and traffic safety;

H.

the impact of recent trends and issues affecting driver and traffic safety programs;

I.

the role of federal, state, and local government agencies and the private sector in providing driver and traffic safety services;

J.

how to design driver and traffic safety programs that are in compliance with professional standards and applicable state rules and laws in a manner responsive to the emerging trends impacting driver and traffic safety;

K.

the major tasks required of the driver and traffic safety coordinator needed for successful program management; and

L.

how to apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences within a range of educational programming models.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of driver and traffic safety are effective on September 1, 2001, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4400 TEACHERS OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of English as a second language is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to provide English language instruction to students whose English proficiency is not sufficient to benefit from the curriculum through mainstream instruction in English or to collaborate and consult with other classroom teachers for the purpose of integrating language and content teaching for English learners.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach English as a second language to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of English as a second language in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of English as a second language must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to J.

A.

An English as a second language teacher demonstrates a high level of proficiency in English commensurate with the role of an instructional model and develops an awareness of the process of formal language learning by learning a second language through two years of second language instruction in a high school setting or one year of second language instruction in a postsecondary setting, or the equivalent.

B.

An English as a second language teacher understands a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of English learners. The teacher must:

(1)

demonstrate an understanding of the importance of using multiple forms of instructional approaches to address different learning styles, background experiences, and performance modes of English learners;

(2)

be able to adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of English learners in a school setting; and

(3)

understand the developmental progression and range of individual variation of English learners in the context in which taught.

C.

An English as a second language teacher uses various content-based methodologies and integrates language acquisition and use of language functions across learning experiences to facilitate full inclusion of English learners in the school setting. The teacher must:

(1)

understand how limited English proficiency affects learning; and

(2)

understand that both language learning and subject matter content are essential to student success in an academic setting.

D.

An English as a second language teacher demonstrates the ability to communicate successfully with students, parents, colleagues, and community members. The teacher must:

(1)

understand that cultural practices may differ and that these differences may affect the way students learn;

(2)

understand schools as organizations within the larger community context and that successful communication with parents must be undertaken within that larger sociocultural framework;

(3)

understand how the student's environment, including family circumstances, community systems, and health and economic conditions, may influence learning; and

(4)

work with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to English learners.

E.

An English as a second language teacher demonstrates an understanding of communication instruction in the second language context and the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners;

(2)

understand how to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as an important contributor to academic success across the curriculum; and

(3)

understand and use a variety of communication techniques and be able to use verbal, nonverbal, and multimedia and other technology based resources that enhance student learning.

F.

An English as a second language teacher understands and uses formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine appropriate placement and to evaluate the progress of English learners. The teacher knows and uses criteria for determining the readiness of students to enter and exit English learner programs. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment techniques;

(2)

understand the limitations of using traditional assessment procedures in the identification and placement of English learners in academic programs, including gifted and special education programs;

(3)

understand second language assessment including item and test construction methods appropriate for English learners; and

(4)

know how to administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment to English learners, the students' parents, and to colleagues.

G.

An English as a second language teacher understands the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education. The teacher must:

(1)

understand basic linguistic concepts;

(2)

understand features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics;

(3)

relate knowledge of English to other languages; and

(4)

understand the history and development of the English language.

H.

An English as a second language teacher understands the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition processes and their similarities and differences. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the processes of first and second language acquisition; and

(2)

understand that there are similarities and differences between child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition.

I.

An English as a second language teacher is aware of how the historical, social, and political aspects of language and cultural patterns in the United States influence second language instruction. The teacher must:

(1)

understand cultural pluralism in the United States, how cultural and social differences are reflected;

(2)

be knowledgeable about the sociolinguistic dynamics of the cultures of the United States; and

(3)

understand how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom.

J.

An English as a second language teacher must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of English as a second language that integrates understanding of English as a second language with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of English as a second language in kindergarten through grade 12 must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of English as a second language and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach English as a second language must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4450 TEACHERS OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to prepare students for family life and the interrelationships between family, community, and work.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach family and consumer sciences to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of family and consumer sciences in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of family and consumer sciences must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to E.

A.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands how the family functions and develops within the home environment. The teacher must understand:

(1)

reciprocal influences between the family and family members to the workplace;

(2)

family structures, functions, relationships, and dynamics;

(3)

parenting as a process through the life cycle;

(4)

physiological, psychological, and social aspects of sexual development throughout the life span;

(5)

management of household and natural resources to achieve personal and family goals including food, clothing, shelter, recreation, transportation, education, and investments;

(6)

the influence of ethics on personal, family, and consumer decisions;

(7)

decision-making models within the context of problem solving in the home environment and the extension to the community;

(8)

the developmental changes of individuals across the life span and ways to meet their corresponding physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and moral development needs;

(9)

how to identify and meet personal and family needs and wants for shelter and clothing to include finding, selecting, and maintaining suitable housing and the role of aesthetics and design in textiles, apparel, and interiors;

(10)

nutrition planning and food preparation, handling, and storage for personal and family safety and well-being; and

(11)

stress factors that affect the family including multigenerational households, family members with special needs, dual careers, economic uncertainty, violence, substance abuse, resolving conflict, and death.

B.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands the interrelatedness of family and community. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the effects of social and technological changes on families;

(2)

value systems within the family and their relationship to social consequences and public policy;

(3)

cultural and ethnic variations in families;

(4)

rights and responsibilities of children, parents or guardians, grandparents, and others;

(5)

variations in parenting practices;

(6)

how to access community resources to solve family problems;

(7)

reciprocal influences of the major social institutions, including governmental and educational, on the family;

(8)

the impact of historical, environmental, and cultural influences on living environments, textiles, and interior design;

(9)

global food sources and their impact on the community; and

(10)

cultural and political aspects of food distribution and consumption.

C.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands career development in related services occupations. As a result of both school-based and work-based learning experiences, the teacher must understand:

(1)

career decision-making process including self-awareness, career research, workplace expectations, career strategies, goal setting, school-to-work transition, and lifelong learning;

(2)

the basic purposes, issues, skills, nature of work, and competencies in one or more of the following related service occupations: Family and Community Support Services; Consumer Resources Management; Early Childhood and Educational Services; Apparel and Textile Design, Manufacturing, and Merchandising; Interior Design and Furnishings; Management and Maintenance of Facilities; Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation; Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition; and Food Production Services;

(3)

the impact of consumer practices, laws, global economics, and conservation or recycling on the service occupations;

(4)

uses and influences of technology in related service occupations;

(5)

the impact of interpersonal skills on the work environment; and

(6)

how families contribute to the preparation of family members for the work environment.

D.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands the teaching of family and consumer sciences that integrates understanding of family and consumer sciences with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of family and consumer sciences to preadolescent and adolescent students must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of family and consumer sciences and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process;

(8)

understand laboratory management practices and procedures;

(9)

understand the impact of public policy on curriculum;

(10)

know fiscal, budgetary, and purchasing practices for operating a comprehensive family and consumer sciences educational program; and

(11)

know marketing techniques for student recruitment and retention in family and consumer sciences programs.

E.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

the relationships between and among print processing abilities and digital content, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(b)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words; and

(c)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers; and

(d)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand family and consumer science texts, and electronic resources including the ability to:

i.

relate what is read to relevant prior knowledge;

ii.

follow instructions to perform laboratory activities step by step in a disciplined fashion;

iii.

explain diagrams and graphs in terms of scientific content and meaning; and

iv.

explain meaning of abbreviations and symbols.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach family and consumer sciences must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4500 TEACHERS OF HEALTH.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of health is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to practice healthy behaviors.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach health to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of health in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of health must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to I.

A.

A teacher of health understands behaviors and factors that:

(1)

prevent or reduce the risk of accidents, sudden illness, and violent injuries;

(2)

prevent or reduce the risk of tobacco use or alcohol and other drug abuse;

(3)

prevent or reduce the risk of HIV infection and AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, and unintentional pregnancy; and

(4)

contribute to sufficient physical activity and promote health-enhancing dietary practices.

B.

A teacher of health understands concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention including:

(1)

the need for and role of a philosophy of health, health education, and health promotion;

(2)

primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention;

(3)

components of comprehensive school health programs and interrelationships among components;

(4)

behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being; and

(5)

physical, social, emotional, and intellectual factors that influence health.

C.

A teacher of health understands how to access valid health information and health-promoting products and services including:

(1)

selecting and evaluating the validity of sources of health education information;

(2)

identifying and accessing appropriate and cost-effective school and community health services;

(3)

identifying and evaluating appropriate lifestyle assessments and health-risk appraisals;

(4)

using or developing appropriate data gathering instruments to include national, state, or district level morbidity, mortality, behavioral risk, and needs assessment data; and

(5)

articulating research and public policy regarding health issues.

D.

A teacher of health understands health-enhancing behaviors that reduce health risks including:

(1)

the short-term and long-term consequences of positive and negative health choices;

(2)

the relationship between and among the major health determinants of genetics, environments, health care, and personal behavior;

(3)

the importance of individual responsibility for health; and

(4)

strategies to reduce and prevent stress-related health problems.

E.

A teacher of health understands the effects of advertising, media, technology, and social norms on health behaviors.

F.

A teacher of health understands how to use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health including:

(1)

models and strategies for teaching communication skills for expressing needs, wants, and feelings; communicating, care, consideration, and respect of self and others; conflict resolution; and refusal skills; and

(2)

strategies for facilitating dialogue related to controversial health issues.

G.

A teacher of health understands how to use goal-setting and decision-making skills to enhance health including:

(1)

age appropriate decision-making and goal-setting models;

(2)

applying decision-making and goal-setting processes to personal health choices;

(3)

the components of and processes for the development and implementation of personal health plans; and

(4)

predicting the immediate and long-range impact of health decisions on the individual, family, and the community.

H.

A teacher of health demonstrates an understanding of the teaching of health that integrates understanding of health with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of health to preadolescent and adolescent students must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of health and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

I.

A teacher of health must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

the relationships between and among print processing abilities and digital content, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(b)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(c)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives; and

(d)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials, both print and digital, to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach health must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4525 TEACHERS OF COMPUTER, KEYBOARDING, AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications is authorized to provide to students in grades kindergarten through 12 instruction that is designed to teach computer applications, including general productivity applications, graphics, imaging, multimedia, video and animation, audio, and digital communications including, but not limited to, the Internet and electronic communications and computer keyboarding. This teacher is authorized to lead, collaborate, and consult with other classroom teachers for the purpose of integrating technology learning into content area curriculum. Nothing in this part prevents a teacher of elementary education from teaching keyboarding to the teacher's own classroom, nor any teacher from teaching computer applications and integrating technology into the teacher's curriculum, or a teacher of business education from teaching keyboarding and computer applications at the grade levels for which the teacher is licensed as a teacher of business education.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure endorsement to teach computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications to students in grades kindergarten through 12 shall hold or qualify for a valid Minnesota classroom teaching license and must have successfully completed a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure endorsement as a teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications under this part. A teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications is limited to teaching in the scope of the teacher's base license.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure endorsement as a teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications in grades kindergarten through 12 must successfully complete a preparation program under subpart 2 that includes the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to C.

A.

A teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications understands and applies:

(1)

knowledge of computers and related technology and peripherals, including hardware, software, file management, care of equipment, and security;

(2)

knowledge about the legal context, ethics, and online safety issues in the use of technology in education, including the changeable nature of these technologies as their applications continue to evolve;

(3)

knowledge about digital equity and meeting the needs of diverse learners;

(4)

knowledge of keyboarding and other input devices, including terminology, techniques, ergonomics, appropriate fingering, skill development, and application to word processing and other applications;

(5)

knowledge of computer applications, including general productivity applications, graphics, multimedia, and digital communications including, but not limited to, the Internet and electronic communications;

(6)

knowledge of emerging technologies and the changing nature of technology in education;

(7)

methods to manage technology, resources, user access, and applications in the education setting;

(8)

strategies to evaluate, select, and apply appropriate hardware, software, and online resources; and

(9)

the knowledge necessary to develop computer technology curriculum.

B.

A teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications provides leadership in the area of technology for a school community. The teacher must be able to:

(1)

model and provide professional development in the use of technology for the enhancement of productivity;

(2)

provide professional development, leadership, and communication related to technology applications;

(3)

participate in technology planning and provide support for integration of technology learning in content area curriculum;

(4)

participate in the development of policies and procedures for technology; and

(5)

assist in the design, development, and organization of learning spaces for the application of integrated technology learning.

C.

A teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications integrates knowledge of computers, keyboarding, and computer applications with understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, methods, processes of evaluation, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher must:

(1)

understand the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of students in grades kindergarten through 12;

(2)

understand and apply best practices of teaching computer and related technology applications to students in grades kindergarten through 12;

(3)

understand the relationship between higher order thinking skills and creativity to the effective application of technology to learning;

(4)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of teaching computer and related technology applications and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(5)

create and apply teaching and learning strategies for many types of technology environments including, but not limited to, lab, mobile, classroom, integrated, and online;

(6)

support the use of technology for formative and summative assessment of student learning including, but not limited to, online testing; and

(7)

apply the standards under part 8710.2000 to teaching keyboarding and computer applications to students in grades kindergarten through 12 in a variety of clinical experiences.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of computer, keyboarding, and related technology applications are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09

History:

26 SR 700; 34 SR 595; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4550 LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALISTS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A library media specialist is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to provide information and technology literacy skills instruction, to lead, collaborate, and consult with other classroom teachers for the purpose of integrating information and technology literacy skills with content teaching, and to administer media center operations, programming, and resources.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a library media specialist shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of library media specialists in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a library media specialist must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to F.

A.

A library media specialist develops and implements an information media program that reflects the vision, mission, and goals of the school. The specialist must:

(1)

identify and apply current educational research, theory, and practice;

(2)

use a research and knowledge base to determine the role of information and technology tools for communication;

(3)

collaborate in developing short-range and long-range plans for the information media program;

(4)

demonstrate basic knowledge of computers and related technology and peripherals, including hardware, software, file management, care of equipment, and security;

(5)

demonstrate basic knowledge of computer-based productivity applications;

(6)

demonstrate basic knowledge of digital communications applications, which can include graphics and multimedia production;

(7)

demonstrate basic knowledge of methods to manage technology, information resources, user access, and applications in an education setting;

(8)

demonstrate ability to evaluate, select, and apply appropriate hardware, software, and other resources; and

(9)

demonstrate the knowledge needed to develop information and technology literacy curriculum.

B.

A library media specialist develops and implements an information and technology literacy program that is an integral part of the total curriculum. The specialist must:

(1)

participate in curriculum development with teachers across grade levels and disciplines;

(2)

plan and conduct a sequential integrated program of instruction in the use of information and technology tools for research and communication;

(3)

collaborate with teachers of early childhood through adult students to design, implement, and assess learning activities to meet specific learning objectives;

(4)

guide students in locating, processing, critically evaluating, and communicating information and to assess the processes and products of the learning;

(5)

provide reading, viewing, and listening guidance appropriate to the students' interests, goals, needs, and abilities;

(6)

provide leadership and staff development in effective use of technologies, strategies, and resources;

(7)

assist teachers in the selection and evaluation of resources;

(8)

consider the developmentally appropriate level, format, and curricular objectives in the design and production of media; and

(9)

formulate and conduct student learning activities that integrate the use of information and technology tools, including the legal context, ethics, and online safety issues inherent in the use of technology for learning and communication and the changeable nature of these technologies.

C.

A library media specialist develops and implements information media program policies and procedures consistent with principles of professional practice and appropriate to the mission and goals of the school and district. The specialist must:

(1)

monitor needs, usage, and trends to structure and justify program budgets;

(2)

administer program budgets in a fiscally sound manner;

(3)

develop a collection based on curriculum and learner needs;

(4)

acquire, process, organize, maintain, circulate, and inventory resources;

(5)

identify and acquire resources beyond the media center to expand information access;

(6)

identify personnel needs and supervise personnel;

(7)

consult and participate in the planning of the media center facility;

(8)

consult and participate in the design of school facilities so that information and technology tools can be used;

(9)

evaluate program, facilities, and resource collections;

(10)

develop and monitor information technology policies and procedures to protect constitutional and statutory rights; and

(11)

establish and maintain a learning environment in the media center.

D.

A library media specialist initiates and maintains motivating environments that foster the continued professional growth of the learning community. The specialist must:

(1)

model and teach responsible and ethical access to and use of information;

(2)

interpret and promote the information and technology literacy program;

(3)

disseminate pertinent information about educational and technological trends and legal developments; and

(4)

provide leadership in incorporating research referenced innovations.

E.

A library media specialist must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of information and technology literacy that integrates understanding of information media with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The library media specialist for children, preadolescents, and adolescents shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of information and technology literacy and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

F.

A library media specialist must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

foundational theories related to practices and materials used in the classroom;

(b)

the relationships between and among print processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest, digital literacy, and how those relationships impact comprehension;

(c)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(d)

the role and rationale in using literature and other texts including electronic texts and nonprint materials across the curriculum;

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a wide variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers in intermediate, middle school, and high school settings across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;

(b)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand content area texts and digital content and spur student interest in more complex reading materials; and

(c)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives;

(3)

the ability to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge; use of instructional practices, approaches, and methods; curriculum materials; and the appropriate use of assessments, including:

(a)

understanding how to create a literacy rich environment that includes a variety of texts, print and digital, student artifacts, literacy instructional supports, and a physical arrangement that promotes literacy learning;

(b)

the ability to create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students; and

(c)

the ability to model and reinforce reading and writing as valued and purposeful lifelong activities; and

(4)

a view of professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility including:

(a)

displaying positive dispositions toward the act of reading and the teaching of reading, including a belief that all students can learn to read regardless of their cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(b)

seeking to be well informed and up-to-date in knowledge of content area literacies;

(c)

actively seeking opportunities to participate in learning communities and professional organizations; and

(d)

developing and maintaining collegial relations to support literacy initiatives across various communities within a district or school and maximize student learning.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for library media specialist licensure must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4600 TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of mathematics is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop understanding and skill in mathematical content and perspectives.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach mathematics in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of mathematics in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of mathematics must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to J.

A.

A teacher of mathematics understands patterns, relations, functions, algebra, and basic concepts underlying calculus from both concrete and abstract perspectives and is able to apply this understanding to represent and solve real world problems. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

recognize, describe, and generalize patterns and build mathematical models to describe situations, solve problems, and make predictions;

(2)

analyze the interaction between quantities and variables to model patterns of change and use appropriate representations including tables, graphs, matrices, words, ordered pairs, algebraic expressions, algebraic equations, and verbal descriptions;

(3)

represent and solve problem situations that involve variable quantities and use appropriate technology;

(4)

understand patterns present in number systems and apply these patterns to further investigations;

(5)

apply properties of boundedness and limits to investigate problems involving sequences and series;

(6)

apply concepts of derivatives to investigate problems involving rates of change;

(7)

apply concepts and standard mathematical representations from differential, integral, and multivariate calculus; linear algebra, including vectors and vector spaces; and transformational operations to solve problems; and

(8)

apply properties of group and field structures to mathematical investigations.

B.

A teacher of mathematics understands the discrete processes from both concrete and abstract perspectives and is able to identify real world applications; the differences between the mathematics of continuous and discrete phenomena; and the relationships involved when discrete models or processes are used to investigate continuous phenomena. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

the application of discrete models to problem situations using appropriate representations such as sequences, vertex-edge graphs and trees, matrices, and arrays;

(2)

application of systematic counting techniques to problem situations including determination of the existence of a solution, the determination of the number of possible solutions, or the optimal solution;

(3)

application of discrete mathematics strategies, for example, pattern searching, organization of information, sorting, case-by-case analysis, iteration and recursion, and mathematical induction, to investigate, solve, and extend problems;

(4)

exploration, development, analysis, and comparison of algorithms designed to accomplish a task or solve a problem;

(5)

application of additional discrete strategies including symbolic logic and linear programming;

(6)

matrices as a mathematical system and matrices and matrix operations as tools to record information and find solutions of systems of equations; and

(7)

analysis of iterative and recursive algorithms to estimate the time needed in order to execute the algorithms for data likely to be encountered in problem situations.

C.

A teacher of mathematics understands that number sense is the underlying structure that ties mathematics into a coherent field of study, rather than an isolated set of rules, facts, and formulae. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

an intuitive sense of numbers including a sense of magnitude, mental mathematics, place value, and a sense of reasonableness of results;

(2)

an understanding of number systems, their properties and relations including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers;

(3)

translation among equivalent forms of numbers to facilitate problem solving;

(4)

application of appropriate methods of estimation of quantities and evaluation of the reasonableness of estimates;

(5)

a knowledge of elementary operations, application of properties of operations, and the estimation of results;

(6)

geometric and polar representation of complex numbers and the interpretation of complex solutions to equations;

(7)

algebraic and transcendental numbers;

(8)

numerical approximation techniques as a basis for numerical integration, numerical-based proofs, and investigation of fractals; and

(9)

number theory divisibility, properties of prime and composite numbers, and the Euclidean algorithm.

D.

A teacher of mathematics understands geometry and measurement from both abstract and concrete perspectives and is able to identify real world applications and to use geometric learning tools and models, including geoboards, compass and straight edge, rules and protractor, patty paper, reflection tools, spheres, and platonic solids. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

shapes and the ways shapes can be derived and described in terms of dimension, direction, orientation, perspective, and relationships among these properties;

(2)

spatial sense and the ways shapes can be visualized, combined, subdivided, and changed to illustrate concepts, properties, and relationships;

(3)

spatial reasoning and the use of geometric models to represent, visualize, and solve problems;

(4)

motion and the ways in which rotation, reflection, and translation of shapes can illustrate concepts, properties, and relationships;

(5)

formal and informal argument, including the processes of making assumptions; formulating, testing, and reformulating conjectures; justifying arguments based on geometric figures; and evaluating the arguments of others;

(6)

plane, solid, and coordinate geometry systems including relations between coordinate and synthetic geometry, and generalizing geometric principles from a two-dimensional system to a three-dimensional system;

(7)

attributes of shapes and objects that can be measured, including length, area, volume, capacity, size of angles, weight, and mass;

(8)

the structure of systems of measurement, including the development and use of measurement systems and the relationships among different systems;

(9)

measuring, estimating, and using measurements to describe and compare geometric phenomena;

(10)

systems of geometry, including Euclidean, non-Euclidean, coordinate, transformational, and projective geometry;

(11)

transformations, coordinates, and vectors, including polar and parametric equations, and the use of these in problem solving;

(12)

three-dimensional geometry and its generalization to other dimensions;

(13)

topology, including topological properties and transformations;

(14)

extend informal argument to include more rigorous proofs; and

(15)

extend work with two-dimensional right triangles including unit circle trigonometry.

E.

A teacher of mathematics uses a variety of conceptual and procedural tools for collecting, organizing, and reasoning about data; applies numerical and graphical techniques for representing and summarizing data; and interprets and draws inferences from these data and makes decisions in a wide range of applied problem situations. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

data and its power as a way to explore questions and issues in our world;

(2)

investigation through data including formulating a problem; devising a plan to collect data; and systematically collecting, recording, and organizing data;

(3)

data representation to describe data distributions, central tendency, and variance through appropriate use of graphs, tables, and summary statistics;

(4)

analysis and interpretation of data, including summarizing data, and making or evaluating arguments, predictions, recommendations, or decisions based on an analysis of the data; and

(5)

descriptive and inferential statistics, including validity and reliability.

F.

A teacher of mathematics understands how to reduce the uncertainties through predictions based on empirical or theoretical probabilities. The teacher of mathematics must demonstrate knowledge of the following mathematical concepts and procedures and the connections among them:

(1)

inference, and the role of randomness and sampling in statistical claims about populations;

(2)

probability as a way to describe chance or risk in simple and compound events;

(3)

predicting outcomes based on exploration of probability through data collection, experiments, and simulations;

(4)

predicting outcomes based on theoretical probabilities, and comparing mathematical expectations with experimental results;

(5)

random variable and the application of random variable to generate and interpret probability distributions;

(6)

probability theory and the link of probability theory to inferential statistics; and

(7)

discrete and continuous probability distributions as a basis for making inferences about population.

G.

A teacher of mathematics is able to reason mathematically, solve problems mathematically, and communicate in mathematics effectively at different levels of formality and knows the connections among mathematical concepts and procedures as well as their application to the real world. The teacher of mathematics must be able to:

(1)

solve problems in mathematics by:

(a)

formulating and posing problems;

(b)

solving problems using different strategies, verifying and interpreting results, and generalizing the solution;

(c)

using problem solving approaches to investigate and understand mathematics; and

(d)

applying mathematical modeling to real world situations;

(2)

reason in mathematics by:

(a)

examining patterns, abstracting and generalizing based on the examination, and making convincing mathematical arguments;

(b)

framing mathematical questions and conjectures, formulating counter-examples, and constructing and evaluating arguments; and

(c)

using intuitive, informal exploration, and formal proof.

(3)

communicate in mathematics by:

(a)

expressing mathematical ideas orally, visually, and in writing;

(b)

using the power of mathematical language, notation, and symbolism; and

(c)

translating mathematical ideas into mathematical language, notations, and symbols; and

(4)

make mathematical connections by:

(a)

demonstrating the interconnectedness of the concepts and procedures of mathematics;

(b)

making connections between mathematics and other disciplines;

(c)

making connections between mathematics and daily living; and

(d)

making connections between equivalent representations of the same concept.

H.

A teacher of mathematics must:

(1)

understand the historical bases of mathematics, including the contributions made by individuals and cultures, and the problems societies faced that gave rise to mathematical systems;

(2)

recognize that there are multiple mathematical world views and how the teacher's own view is similar to or different from that of the students;

(3)

understand the overall framework of mathematics including the:

(a)

processes and consequences of expanding mathematical systems;

(b)

examination of the effects of broad ideas, including operations or properties, as these ideas are applied to various systems;

(c)

examination of the same object from different perspectives; and

(d)

investigation of the logical reasoning that takes place within a system; and

(4)

understand the role of technology, manipulatives, and models in mathematics.

I.

A teacher of mathematics must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of mathematics that integrates understanding of mathematics with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of mathematics to preadolescent and adolescent students shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of mathematics and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

J.

A teacher of mathematics must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

orthographic knowledge and morphological relationships within words;

(b)

the relationship between word recognition and vocabulary knowledge, fluency, and comprehension in understanding text and content materials;

(c)

the importance of direct and indirect vocabulary instruction that leads to enhanced general and domain-specific word knowledge;

(d)

the relationships between and among comprehension processes related to print processing abilities, motivation, reader's interest, background knowledge, cognitive abilities, knowledge of academic discourse, and print and digital text; and

(e)

the development of academic language and its impact on learning and school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers of varying proficiency levels and linguistic backgrounds in secondary settings;

(b)

the ability to scaffold instruction for students who experience comprehension difficulties;

(c)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words;

(e)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand math texts and spur student interest in more complex reading materials, including:

i.

the density of ideas;

ii.

concepts that build within a chapter or across chapters;

iii.

use of equations to model life situations, asking students to create or restate in words or sentences the relationship between symbols and the situation being modeled;

iv.

text with diagrams and graphs; and

v.

use of different representations to aid students in understanding the underlying mathematical concept, matching each representation to the learning styles of different individuals; and

(f)

model strategies for representing mathematical ideas in a variety of modes (literal, symbolic, graphic, and digital), which includes asking students to restate symbolic representations (numerals, equations, and graphs) in words or sentences.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach mathematics must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4650 TEACHERS OF VOCAL MUSIC AND OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of vocal music is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop vocal music competence and understanding of general music history, theory, and practice. A teacher of instrumental music is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to develop instrumental music competence and understanding of general music history, theory, and practice.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach vocal music or instrumental music to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of vocal music and of instrumental music.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of vocal music or instrumental music must complete a program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A, B, D, and E, or A, C, D, and E.

A.

All music teachers must have the ability to:

(1)

identify and analyze representative musical forms, styles, performance contexts, performance media, and composers and compositions of western music, and describe the musical traditions, context, and characteristics of diverse and representative world cultures;

(2)

demonstrate a basic knowledge of vocal development and production and instrumental techniques and acoustics;

(3)

perform simple keyboard accompaniments and play parts from a musical score;

(4)

demonstrate basic skills and techniques for playing typical classroom instruments including recorder or fretted instruments;

(5)

demonstrate competence in improvising, composing, and arranging music examples for diverse developmental and ability groupings represented by students;

(6)

demonstrate physical response to music through movement or dance;

(7)

identify and reproduce intervals, scales, and chord structures;

(8)

demonstrate a basic knowledge of approaches to general music instruction, materials, and literature for students of varying abilities;

(9)

demonstrate the understandings and skills necessary to choose appropriate current technology and integrate its use into instruction for music classroom and ensemble settings in kindergarten through grade 12; and

(10)

demonstrate a basic knowledge of the interrelationship of music with other art forms and disciplines.

B.

A teacher of vocal music must:

(1)

demonstrate advanced vocal ensemble performance and advanced solo performance with the voice, keyboard, or guitar and demonstrate musical accuracy and expressiveness using music examples from diverse styles and time periods;

(2)

demonstrate ability to accompany a vocal ensemble on a keyboard instrument;

(3)

interpret choral music scores with an understanding of range, tessitura, phrasing, diction, and articulation;

(4)

interpret vocal and instrumental scores and understand percussion, string, or wind instrument requirements necessary for interpreting and producing music from scores;

(5)

know vocal and choral instructional materials and solo and ensemble repertoire, representing diverse periods and cultures, and beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels from kindergarten through grade 12;

(6)

demonstrate understandings and skills of vocal performance pedagogy and vocal health, including the child voice and the changing voice;

(7)

rehearse and conduct small and large vocal and choral performance ensembles; and

(8)

improvise using keyboard or voice.

C.

A teacher of instrumental music must:

(1)

demonstrate advanced solo and ensemble performance on at least one instrument of the keyboard, percussion, string, or wind families and demonstrate musical accuracy and expressiveness using music examples from diverse styles and time periods;

(2)

interpret scores designed for instrumental ensembles and understand bowing, fingering, or articulation specific to percussion, string, and wind instruments;

(3)

interpret combined vocal and instrumental scores and understand vocal requirements necessary for interpreting and producing music from scores;

(4)

know instrumental instructional materials and solo and ensemble repertoire, representing diverse periods and cultures, and beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels;

(5)

demonstrate understandings and skills or performance pedagogy for percussion, string, and wind instruments;

(6)

rehearse and conduct small and large instrumental ensembles;

(7)

improvise by means of a keyboard, percussion, string, or wind instrument; and

(8)

understand the fundamentals of the construction, operation, and repair of percussion, string, and wind instruments.

D.

All teachers of music must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of music that integrates understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of music shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten or primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of vocal or instrumental music and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

E.

All teachers of music must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including the relationships between and among print processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific words.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach vocal music and instrumental music must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4700 TEACHERS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of physical education is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to enhance physical growth and development through learning to move and learning through movement.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach physical education to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of physical education.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of physical education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D.

A.

A teacher of physical education understands and applies the skills necessary to perform varied physical activities including:

(1)

essential elements and sequencing of basic motor skills;

(2)

individual, dual, and team activities; lifetime fitness activities; fundamental gymnastics; rhythms and dance, for example, singing games and folk, square, ballroom, creative, contemporary, and modern dance; low organization, lead up, and cooperative games; aquatics; aerobics, body mechanics, conditioning exercises, and strength training;

(3)

appropriate instructional cues and prompts for basic motor skills and physical activity; and

(4)

how to support and encourage learner expression through movement.

B.

A teacher of physical education understands disciplinary knowledge of physical activities and well-being, including:

(1)

the organic, skeletal, and neuromuscular structures of the human body and how these structures adapt and contribute to physical activity, motor performance, fitness, and wellness;

(2)

concepts and strategies related to physical activity and fitness;

(3)

disciplinary concepts and principles to skillful movement and physical activity;

(4)

interdisciplinary learning experiences that allow students to integrate knowledge, skills, and methods of inquiry from multiple subject areas;

(5)

organization and administration of physical education programs;

(6)

etiquette, sportsmanship, and officiating;

(7)

selection and use of appropriate supplies and equipment;

(8)

safety issues to consider when planning and implementing instruction;

(9)

appropriate emergency procedures;

(10)

safety, CPR, first aid procedures, and prevention and care of injuries;

(11)

the relationship among physical activity, fitness, and health including developmental adaptive physical education programs;

(12)

historical, philosophical, sociological, and psychological factors associated with varied physical activities; and

(13)

health-related concepts, concerns, assumptions, debates, processes of inquiry, and personal hygiene central to the study of physical activity.

C.

A teacher of physical education must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of physical education that integrates understanding of physical education with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of physical education to children, preadolescents, and adolescents must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

understand the benefits and implications of, and how to, promote lifelong physical recreation;

(4)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of physical education and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(5)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(6)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(7)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(8)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

D.

A teacher of physical education must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials including electronic resources to support reading and writing instruction including:

(1)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(2)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific words; and

(3)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, methods, and match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach physical education must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

8710.4725 TEACHERS OF READING.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of reading is authorized to facilitate and provide for kindergarten through grade 12 students instruction that is designed to develop reading skills, strategies, and comprehension. The teacher of reading is also authorized to provide assistance to teachers who have responsibility for providing reading instruction. Nothing in this part restricts teachers of elementary education, teachers of English as a second language, or teachers of special education from providing reading instruction to students they are licensed to teach nor restricts any other teacher from providing instruction in reading in their content areas.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach reading to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold or qualify for a teaching license, as defined in part 8710.0310, valid for:

(1)

one or more of the following student levels: elementary, middle, or secondary;

(2)

kindergarten through grade 12 special education teaching under parts 8710.5000 to 8710.5800;

(3)

English as a second language teaching under part 8710.4400; or

(4)

adult basic education teaching under part 8710.4000; and

B.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of reading including standards under subpart 3a.

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, 34 SR 595]

Subp. 3a.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of reading must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item B, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to E.

A.

A teacher of reading must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes and instruction:

(1)

demonstrate the ability to support a philosophy of literacy instruction with theory and research;

(2)

indicate knowledge of reading theories and how these translate into effective practices;

(3)

apply reading research studies and articulate how these studies impact reading instruction at the elementary, middle, and high school levels;

(4)

understand the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents as it pertains to reading instruction;

(5)

understand the progression of reading development (emergent, beginning, transitional, intermediate, and advanced) and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity with a heightened awareness to the needs of struggling readers;

(6)

describe developmental progress in oral language and its relationship to reading;

(7)

teach and foster emergent reading skills such as phonemic awareness, alphabet recognition, and understanding that printed words convey meaning;

(8)

teach and foster word recognition skills including phonics, structural analysis, and contextual analysis;

(9)

foster the development of an initial sight vocabulary and an increasingly larger and more complex vocabulary, mastering word-learning strategies such as the use of context and structural analysis, and developing word consciousness;

(10)

teach and foster fluency and automaticity in both oral and silent reading;

(11)

teach and foster comprehension and appreciation of a wide range of children's and adolescent literature;

(12)

teach comprehension strategies such as adjusting reading approach, activating background knowledge, summarizing, generating questions, constructing mental representations, and self-monitoring;

(13)

teach and foster critical thinking skills and behaviors such as thinking independently, withholding judgment, recognizing point of view and bias, and considering multiple solutions; and

(14)

teach writing to advance reading development and learning from text.

B.

A teacher of reading must be able to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction:

(1)

organize and manage effective reading instruction appropriate across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;

(2)

implement a variety of appropriate grouping strategies including individual, small group, and whole group reading instruction;

(3)

implement and reflect on the use of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, which support the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(4)

understand and apply instructional and informational technologies, digital literacy, and electronic resources to support literacy;

(5)

identify, secure, and use high-quality literature, which meets the interest and reading needs of all readers and represents various cultures and genres;

(6)

understand the rationale for using a wide range of texts and show evidence of using multiple texts within instruction, including informational texts, content area texts, electronic texts, and nonprint materials;

(7)

understand the structures of texts, both print and electronic, and the challenges presented by these materials, and use this knowledge in lesson design to match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers and across the curriculum; and

(8)

demonstrate competency through a variety of clinical experiences with elementary, middle, and high school students.

C.

A teacher of reading must be able to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction:

(1)

understand the principles surrounding a wide variety of instruments, their purposes, strengths, and limitations;

(2)

select appropriate tools for specific situations that includes assessment for diagnosis and progress monitoring;

(3)

demonstrate expertise in the administration and interpretation of a wide variety of measures that track student progress by individual, class, cohort, and school;

(4)

demonstrate expertise in using assessment information to plan differentiated classroom instruction for students, including those at different cognitive and developmental stages, and those from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds;

(5)

use assessment data to develop interventions that address specific student needs;

(6)

select materials, identify appropriate instructional strategies, and allocate resources needed to implement interventions and remediations; and

(7)

communicate results of assessments, students, parents, caregivers, colleagues, and administrators.

D.

A teacher of reading must be able to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments including:

(1)

use students' interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading program and provide authentic reasons to read and write;

(2)

support students and colleagues in the selection of materials, print and electronic, that match students' reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

develop and implement classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4)

integrate technology into reading instruction to create and maintain an environment that includes conventional and new literacies and ensures equity of access to technology;

(5)

create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students;

(6)

promote a shared vision that all students can learn literacy regardless of their cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(7)

use literature to engage students in dialogue, critical thinking, and reflection around issues of social justice;

(8)

promote critical literacy by encouraging student to question what they are reading while analyzing texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives; and

(9)

understand the importance of and facilitate home school connections.

E.

A teacher of reading must view professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility including:

(1)

serve as a role model and display positive attitudes toward literacy in the district/building by engaging in reading and writing practices;

(2)

promote and facilitate ongoing self-reflection related to teaching and student learning;

(3)

seek to be well informed and share up-to-date knowledge of literacy learning with colleagues;

(4)

apply aspects of coaching feedback to instructional practice;

(5)

actively seek opportunities to participate in learning communities and professional organizations;

(6)

collaborate with and provide guidance for colleagues who seek classroom instruction support in reading;

(7)

engage in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs; and

(8)

understand current state and federal legislation as it relates to reading.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of reading are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

26 SR 700; 30 SR 943; 34 SR 595; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22; 43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018

8710.4750 TEACHERS OF SCIENCE.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of chemistry, earth and space science, life science, or physics is authorized to provide instruction in all science disciplines to students in grades 5 through 8 and either chemistry, earth and space science, life science, or physics, and integrated science offerings, to students in grades 9 through 12. The science discipline that the teacher is qualified to teach in grades 9 through 12 shall be identified on the teacher's license.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach science to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8700.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of science in grades 5 through 8 in subpart 3 and chemistry, earth and space science, life science, or physics in grades 9 through 12 in subpart 4, 5, 6, or 7.

Subp. 2a.

Exception for candidates with partial science teaching qualification.

The board shall issue a license valid for teaching chemistry, earth and space science, life science, or physics in grades 9 through 12 for candidates who complete the requirements of subpart 2, items A and B; and subpart 4; 5; 6; or 7, but have not completed subpart 3. The board shall issue a license to teach all sciences in grades 5 through 8 to a candidate who has completed the requirements of subparts 2, items A and B, and 3 but has not completed subpart 4, 5, 6, or 7. Licenses issued to teach all sciences in grades 5 through 8 under this exception or as a science specialty under part 8710.3200 are not valid for teaching integrated science offerings above grade 9.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standards for science in grades 5 through 8.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of science in grades 5 through 8 must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to F.

A.

A teacher of science must demonstrate science perspectives, including:

(1)

understanding and conducting science inquiry as evidenced by the ability to:

(a)

ask appropriate theoretical or empirical questions about a given system or event that build on current scientific knowledge and can be answered scientifically;

(b)

design and conduct, using appropriate methods, technology, and mathematical tools, a scientific investigation to answer a given question;

(c)

develop, using appropriate sources of information, qualitative and quantitative solutions to problems;

(d)

communicate clearly and concisely, using words, diagrams, tables, graphs, and mathematical relationships, the methods and procedures, results, and conclusions for a given empirical question or problem;

(e)

justify a scientific explanation of a given system or event, compared to alternative explanations, based on the available empirical evidence, current scientific understanding, and logical arguments; and

(f)

criticize, using knowledge of common errors of evidence and logic, a given science-related claim or argument; and

(2)

understanding the history and nature of scientific knowledge as evidenced by the ability to:

(a)

describe the evolution of scientific knowledge in a given historical context in terms of the contributions of male and female individuals from various cultures; the influence of society, culture, and personal beliefs of the scientists involved; and the accumulating empirical evidence and logical arguments used to develop the new knowledge;

(b)

explain why scientists disagree on a given contemporary controversy in terms of the different assumptions made by the scientists, the different values the scientists place on a particular piece of evidence, and the limitations of the available data or theories, or both; and

(c)

explain, using knowledge of the role of empirical evidence and logical argument in science and the assumption that the universe is a vast single system in which the basic rules are everywhere the same, why a given contemporary or historical belief is nonscience.

B.

A teacher of science must have the knowledge and ability to make conceptual connections within and across the domains of science and between science and technology. The teacher of science must understand:

(1)

connections across the domains of science as evidenced by the ability to:

(a)

describe, using words and diagrams, a given technological, biological, physical, earth, or space system in terms of its components, inputs, outputs, and control or feedback;

(b)

describe, using a specific example, the use of a given unifying theme or principle in the physical sciences, life sciences, and earth and space sciences; and

(c)

explain, using unifying scientific principles, a given set of seemingly unrelated systems or events, both within a science domain and across science domains;

(2)

connections between science and technology as evidenced by the ability to:

(a)

describe the similarities and differences between the goals and processes of scientific inquiry and the goals and processes of technological design;

(b)

explain how the availability of new technology influenced the development of scientific knowledge in a given contemporary or historical context and how the development of new scientific knowledge led to technological advances in a given contemporary or historical context;

(c)

explain and predict the possible unexpected benefits and the negative side effects and unintended consequences of a given technological advance;

(d)

explain why the contributions of individuals from different scientific disciplines and of technology were necessary for the success of a given contemporary or historical scientific investigation; and

(e)

design a modification or use of a system to meet certain needs or criteria in either chemistry, earth and space science, biology, or physics; and

(3)

connections between science and other school subjects as evidenced by the ability to:

(a)

communicate clearly and precisely, using words, physical models, computer models, demonstrations, diagrams, flow charts, numbers, tables, graphs, and appropriate mathematical relationships, the observations, methods and procedures, results, and conclusions for a given empirical question or problem; explanations of how or why something happens; predictions of what will happen when a change is made; the design for modifying or using a system; and the evaluation of the design against the needs or criteria it was designed to meet;

(b)

interpret a given text, physical or computer model, demonstration, diagram, flow chart, set of numbers, table, graph, and appropriate mathematical relationships;

(c)

use computer software or graphing calculators to display and analyze data and to model solutions to a prediction or design problem;

(d)

explain how mathematics influenced the development of scientific knowledge in a given contemporary or historical context, and how the development of new scientific knowledge led to new mathematics in a given contemporary or historical context; and

(e)

describe the impact on society and culture of a given historical development of scientific ideas.

C.

A teacher of science understands how knowledge of concepts and principles of science and technology and knowledge of factors influencing personal and community health, population growth, natural resources, environmental quality, and natural and human-induced hazards influence decisions about personal and societal issues. The teacher of science must:

(1)

predict the scientific, economic, political, and ethical factors that could influence a course of action to address a given personal issue or local, national, or global challenge;

(2)

design, using the systematic approaches of science and scientific knowledge, a course of action to address a personal issue or a given local, national, or global challenge; and

(3)

justify and defend a given design for a course of action in terms of an assessment of alternatives, risks, costs, and benefits, and consideration of who benefits and who suffers, who pays and gains, and what the risks are and who bears them.

D.

A teacher of science must be able to understand and apply fundamental principles, laws, and concepts of earth and space science, life science, and physical science. The teacher of science must:

(1)

know and apply the fundamental principles, laws, and concepts of earth and space science including understanding:

(a)

the components and evolution of the Earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

i.

describe, using words, diagrams, pictures, and graphs, the physical properties of a given Earth material;

ii.

explain, from observation of its composition, texture, and physical state using physical, geological, or biological processes, a plausible way in which a given rock formed through time;

iii.

explain, in terms of environmental changes, structural events, plate tectonics, and sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic, and biologic processes, how observed differences within a given rock sequence are related to the various processes that may have formed the rocks;

iv.

explain, in terms of environmental changes, structural events, plate tectonics, and sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic, and biologic processes, a plausible way in which a given rock sequence formed through time;

v.

explain, in terms of the physical processes that formed it, the origin and development of a given Earth structure;

vi.

predict, in terms of known rock sequences, how a given geologic or biologic event might be recorded in a rock sequence; and

vii.

explain, using the fossil record and decay rates of radioactive isotopes, how the age of a given rock is determined;

(b)

matter and energy in the Earth system as evidenced by the ability to:

i.

explain, using convection, conduction, and radiation, how matter is transported and how energy drives the process of transportation of matter within and between given Earth subsystems or structures;

ii.

explain, using convection, conduction, radiation, and conservation of energy, how energy is transmitted and transformed within and between given Earth subsystems or structures;

iii.

design a simple physical model that mimics the behavior of a given Earth system; and