Skip to main content Skip to office menu Skip to footer
Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.4825 TEACHER COORDINATORS OF WORK-BASED LEARNING.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher coordinator of work-based learning is authorized to provide and coordinate instruction that enables students to learn through work and to consult and collaborate with families, other teachers, and business, industry, labor, and community representatives in designing, implementing, and evaluating student learning through work. For the purposes of this part, "work-based learning" means learning through paid and unpaid work-based experiences where the worksite is the educational setting for one or more hours of the school day or week for one or more quarters or semesters of the school year.

Subp. 2.

License requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher coordinator of work-based learning shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

hold or apply and qualify for another Minnesota license valid for teaching in grades 9 through 12; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teacher coordinators of work-based learning in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher coordinator of work-based learning must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to D. The knowledge and skills required in this subpart shall be acquired through college coursework and experiences including employment, internship, mentorship, job shadowing, or apprenticeships.

A.

A teacher coordinator understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and history and context of work-based learning. The teacher must understand:

(1)

contemporary issues pertaining to creating learning environments for students at work;

(2)

models and legislation that provide the basis for connecting students' school experiences with the workplace or further education and for learning through work; and

(3)

the role of work-based learning in providing students kindergarten through grade 12 with opportunities to learn about work and how to work and, when appropriate, to learn through work.

B.

A teacher coordinator understands how to design and implement school-based instruction that focuses on enabling students to learn about work, how to acquire skills, and gain a perspective and direction on a career pathway. The teacher must understand:

(1)

basic workplace readiness and employability skills and employment trends;

(2)

the role and process of a human resources department in the organizational structure;

(3)

the career decision-making process, including self-awareness, career research, workplace expectations, career development strategies, school-to-work transition, and life-long learning;

(4)

how to research a career and access career information;

(5)

how to connect students' school-based experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and future educational opportunities;

(6)

unique student needs and how to adapt and modify curriculum and instruction and work collaboratively with other teachers to accommodate the unique needs;

(7)

strategies for teaching students self-advocacy and functional life skills relevant to independence, social skills, and community and personal living;

(8)

strategies for teaching students to learn about work, how to acquire skills, and gain a perspective on a career;

(9)

role and purpose of intra-curricular activities including their application as a vehicle for teaching group process, cooperation, collaboration, service, and leadership;

(10)

how to market the work-based learning program including student and employer recruitment and retention techniques; and

(11)

how to implement systematic procedures for continuous program improvement.

C.

A teacher coordinator understands how to establish and monitor work-based instruction that focuses on enabling students to learn about work, how to acquire skills, and gain a perspective and direction on a career pathway. The teacher must understand:

(1)

criteria for determining when work is a learning experience;

(2)

various placement options and selection of educational options based on the needs, abilities, and interests of the student;

(3)

laws pertaining to employment including the Americans with Disabilities Act, state and federal labor laws including wage and hour laws and volunteerism, and data privacy laws;

(4)

how to develop and implement training agreements that are consistent with school guidelines and expectations for student participation in the program;

(5)

how to match the individual needs of the student to the work-based learning site;

(6)

how to work collaboratively in designing, implementing, and evaluating a student's individual training plan;

(7)

job task analysis and how to use it to appropriately sequence instruction;

(8)

how to teach mentors and students in the work-based learning setting;

(9)

how to monitor, summarize, and report the acquisition of the work-based learning outcomes identified in the training plan;

(10)

performance assessment and how to apply it to assessing student on-the-job learning; and

(11)

how to identify, develop, and maintain employment sites.

D.

A teacher coordinator communicates and interacts with students, their families, other teachers, and representatives of business, industry, labor, and the community to support student learning through work. The teacher must understand:

(1)

how to actively engage parents, and representatives of business, industry, labor, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(2)

how to assist students and their parents in making decisions about students' academic and occupational choices;

(3)

effective communication and problem-solving skills; and

(4)

how to access and evaluate information from consumer and professional organizations, publications, and journals relevant to teaching and learning through work.

Subp. 4.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licenses.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

Requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher coordinator of work-based learning are effective on September 1, 2001, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017