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CHAPTER 126B. Education and employment transitions system

Table of Sections
SectionHeadnote
126B.01Education and employment transitions system.
126B.02Repealed, 1995 c 131 s 3; 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31
126B.03Comprehensive youth apprenticeship program.
126B.04Repealed, 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31
126B.05Repealed, 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31
126B.06General provisions.
126B.10Education and employment transitions partnerships.

126B.01 Education and employment transitions system.

Subdivision 1. Goals. To better prepare all learners to make transitions between education and employment, a comprehensive education and employment transitions system is established that is driven by multisector partnerships and takes a lifelong approach to workforce development. The goals of the statewide education and employment transitions system are:

(1) to improve the skills learners need to achieve greater levels of self-sufficiency through education, training, and work;

(2) to improve work-related counseling and information about career opportunities and vocational education programs available to learners to facilitate workforce development;

(3) to integrate opportunities for work-based learning, service-learning, and other applied learning methods into the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary curriculum and state and local graduation standards;

(4) to increase participation in employment opportunities and demonstrate the relationship between education and employment at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education levels;

(5) to promote the efficient use of public and private resources by coordinating elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education with related government programs;

(6) to expand educational options available to all learners through collaborative efforts between school districts, post-secondary institutions, employers, organized labor, workers, learners, parents, community-based organizations, and other interested parties;

(7) to increase opportunities for women, minorities, individuals with a disability, and at-risk learners to fully participate in work-based learning;

(8) to establish performance standards for learners that integrate state and local graduation standards and generally recognized industry and occupational skill standards; and

(9) to provide support systems including a unified labor market information system; a centralized quality assurance system with information on learner achievement, employer satisfaction, and measurable system outcomes; a statewide marketing system to promote the importance of lifework development; a comprehensive professional development system for public and private sector partners; and a comprehensive system for providing technical support to local partnerships for education and employment transitions.

Subd. 2. Funding. Work-based learning programs incorporating post-secondary instruction implemented under this chapter shall provide for student funding according to section 123.3514.

Subd. 3. Governor's workforce development council. The governor's workforce development council is responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating the statewide education and employment transitions system and achieving the goals of the system.

Subd. 4. Partnership grants. The council shall award grants to implement local education and employment transition systems to local education and employment transition partnerships established under section 126B.10. Grants under this section may be used for the local education and employment transitions system, youth apprenticeship and other work-based learning programs, youth employer programs, youth entrepreneurship programs, and other programs and purposes the council determines fulfill the purposes of the education and employment transitions system. The council shall evaluate grant proposals on the basis of the elements required in the local plan described in section 126B.10, subdivision 3. The council shall develop and publicize the grant application process and review and comment on the proposals submitted. Priority in awarding grants must be given to local partnerships that include multiple communities and a viable base of educational, work-based learning, and employment opportunities.

Subd. 5. Annual review. The council shall review the activities of each local education and employment transitions partnership annually to ensure that the local partnership is adequately meeting the system standards under section 126B.10 and state quality assurance standards established as part of the quality assurance system developed by the council. This subdivision expires July 1, 1997.

Subd. 6. Report. The council shall annually publish a report summarizing the data submitted by each local education and employment transitions partnership. The report shall be published no later than September 1 of the year following the year in which the data was collected. This subdivision expires July 1, 1997.

HIST: 1993 c 335 s 1; 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 23

126B.02 Repealed, 1995 c 131 s 3; 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31

126B.03 Comprehensive youth apprenticeship program.

Subdivision 1. Repealed, 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31

Subd. 2. Academic instruction and work-related learning. Comprehensive youth apprenticeship programs and other work-based learning programs under the education and employment transitions system must integrate academic instruction and work-related learning in the classroom and at the workplace. Schools, in collaboration with learners' employers, must use competency-based measures to evaluate learners' progress in the program. Learners who successfully complete the program must receive academic and occupational credentials from the participating school.

Subd. 3. Youth apprenticeship programs. (a) A comprehensive youth apprenticeship program must require representatives of secondary and post-secondary school systems, affected local businesses, industries, occupations and labor, as well as the local community, to be actively and collaboratively involved in advising and managing the program and ensuring, in consultation with local private industry councils, that the youth apprenticeship program meets local labor market demands, provides student apprentices with the high skill training necessary for career advancement, meets applicable state graduation requirements and labor standards, pays apprentices for their work and provides support services to program participants.

(b) Local employers, collaborating with labor organizations where appropriate, must assist the program by analyzing workplace needs, creating work-related curriculum, employing and adequately paying youth apprentices engaged in work-related learning in the workplace, training youth apprentices to become skilled in an occupation, providing student apprentices with a workplace mentor, periodically informing the school of an apprentice's progress, and making a reasonable effort to employ youth apprentices who successfully complete the program.

(c) A student participating in a comprehensive youth apprenticeship program must sign a youth apprenticeship agreement with participating entities that obligates youth apprentices, their parents or guardians, employers, and schools to meet program requirements; indicates how academic instruction, work-based learning, and worksite learning and experience will be integrated; ensures that successful youth apprentices will receive a recognized credential of academic and occupational proficiency; and establishes the wage rate and other benefits for which youth apprentices are eligible while employed during the program.

(d) Secondary school principals, counselors, or business mentors familiar with the education to employment transitions system must inform entering secondary school students about available occupational and career opportunities and the option of entering a youth apprenticeship or other work-based learning program to obtain post-secondary academic and occupational credentials.

HIST: 1993 c 224 art 14 s 17; 1993 c 335 s 3; 1993 c 374 s 25; 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 24,25

126B.04 Repealed, 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31

126B.05 Repealed, 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 31

126B.06 General provisions.

All state and federal laws relating to workplace health and safety apply to youth apprenticeships.

The employment of a youth apprentice may not displace or cause any reduction in the number of nonovertime hours worked, wages, or benefits of a currently employed worker.

HIST: 1993 c 335 s 6

126B.10 Education and employment transitions partnerships.

Subdivision 1. Local partnerships; establishment. Local education and employment transitions partnerships may be established to implement local education and employment transitions systems. Local partnerships shall represent multiple sectors in the community, including, at a minimum, representatives of employers, primary and secondary education, labor and professional organizations, workers, learners, parents, community-based organizations, and to the extent possible, post-secondary education.

Subd. 2. Board. A local education and employment transitions partnership shall establish a governing board for planning and implementing work-based and other applied learning programs. The board shall consist of at least one representative from each member of the education and employment transitions partnership. A majority of the board must consist of representatives of local or regional employers.

Subd. 3. Local education and employment transitions systems. A local education and employment transitions partnership shall assess the needs of employers, employees, and learners, and develop a plan for implementing and achieving the objectives of a local or regional education and employment transitions system. The plan shall provide for a comprehensive local system for assisting learners and workers in making the transition from school to work or for retraining in a new vocational area. The objectives of a local education and employment transitions system include:

(1) increasing the effectiveness of the educational programs and curriculum of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary schools and the work site in preparing students in the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the workplace;

(2) implementing learner outcomes for students in grades kindergarten through 12 designed to introduce the world of work and to explore career opportunities, including nontraditional career opportunities;

(3) eliminating barriers to providing effective integrated applied learning, service-learning, or work-based curriculum;

(4) increasing opportunities to apply academic knowledge and skills, including skills needed in the workplace, in local settings which include the school, school-based enterprises, post-secondary institutions, the workplace, and the community;

(5) increasing applied instruction in the attitudes and skills essential for success in the workplace, including cooperative working, leadership, problem-solving, and respect for diversity;

(6) providing staff training for vocational guidance counselors, teachers, and other appropriate staff in the importance of preparing learners for the transition to work, and in methods of providing instruction that incorporate applied learning, work-based learning, and service-learning experiences;

(7) identifying and enlisting local and regional employers who can effectively provide work-based or service-learning opportunities, including, but not limited to, apprenticeships, internships, and mentorships;

(8) recruiting community and workplace mentors including peers, parents, employers and employed individuals from the community, and employers of high school students;

(9) identifying current and emerging educational, training, and employment needs of the area or region, especially within industries with potential for job growth;

(10) improving the coordination and effectiveness of local vocational and job training programs, including vocational education, adult basic education, tech prep, apprenticeship, service-learning, youth entrepreneur, youth training and employment programs administered by the commissioner of economic security, and local job training programs under the Job Training Partnership Act, United States Code, title 29, section 1501, et seq.;

(11) identifying and applying for federal, state, local, and private sources of funding for vocational or applied learning programs;

(12) providing students with current information and counseling about career opportunities, potential employment, educational opportunities in post-secondary institutions, workplaces, and the community, and the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed;

(13) providing educational technology, including interactive television networks and other distance learning methods, to ensure access to a broad variety of work-based learning opportunities;

(14) including students with disabilities in a district's vocational or applied learning program and ways to serve at-risk learners through collaboration with area learning centers under sections 124C.45 to 124C.49, or other alternative programs; and

(15) providing a warranty to employers, post-secondary education programs, and other post-secondary training programs, that learners successfully completing a high school work-based or applied learning program will be able to apply the knowledge and work skills included in the program outcomes or graduation requirements. The warranty shall require education and training programs to continue to work with those learners that need additional skill development until they can demonstrate achievement of the program outcomes or graduation requirements.

Subd. 4. Annual reports. A local education and employment transitions partnership shall annually publish a report and submit information to the council as required. The report shall include information required by the council for the statewide system performance assessment. The report shall be available to the public in the communities served by the local education and employment transitions partnership. The report shall be published no later than September 1 of the year following the year in which the data was collected.

HIST: 1Sp1995 c 3 art 4 s 26,30