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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.4725 TEACHERS OF READING.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of reading is authorized to facilitate and provide for kindergarten through grade 12 students instruction that is designed to develop reading skills, strategies, and comprehension. The teacher of reading is also authorized to provide assistance to teachers who have responsibility for providing reading instruction. Nothing in this part restricts teachers of elementary education, teachers of English as a second language, or teachers of special education from providing reading instruction to students they are licensed to teach nor restricts any other teacher from providing instruction in reading in their content areas.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach reading to students in kindergarten through grade 12 shall:

A.

hold or qualify for a teaching license, as defined in part 8710.0310, valid for:

(1)

one or more of the following student levels: elementary, middle, or secondary;

(2)

kindergarten through grade 12 special education teaching under parts 8710.5000 to 8710.5800;

(3)

English as a second language teaching under part 8710.4400; or

(4)

adult basic education teaching under part 8710.4000; and

B.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of reading including standards under subpart 3a.

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, 34 SR 595]

Subp. 3a.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of reading must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item B, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to E.

A.

A teacher of reading must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes and instruction:

(1)

demonstrate the ability to support a philosophy of literacy instruction with theory and research;

(2)

indicate knowledge of reading theories and how these translate into effective practices;

(3)

apply reading research studies and articulate how these studies impact reading instruction at the elementary, middle, and high school levels;

(4)

understand the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents as it pertains to reading instruction;

(5)

understand the progression of reading development (emergent, beginning, transitional, intermediate, and advanced) and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity with a heightened awareness to the needs of struggling readers;

(6)

describe developmental progress in oral language and its relationship to reading;

(7)

teach and foster emergent reading skills such as phonemic awareness, alphabet recognition, and understanding that printed words convey meaning;

(8)

teach and foster word recognition skills including phonics, structural analysis, and contextual analysis;

(9)

foster the development of an initial sight vocabulary and an increasingly larger and more complex vocabulary, mastering word-learning strategies such as the use of context and structural analysis, and developing word consciousness;

(10)

teach and foster fluency and automaticity in both oral and silent reading;

(11)

teach and foster comprehension and appreciation of a wide range of children's and adolescent literature;

(12)

teach comprehension strategies such as adjusting reading approach, activating background knowledge, summarizing, generating questions, constructing mental representations, and self-monitoring;

(13)

teach and foster critical thinking skills and behaviors such as thinking independently, withholding judgment, recognizing point of view and bias, and considering multiple solutions; and

(14)

teach writing to advance reading development and learning from text.

B.

A teacher of reading must be able to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction:

(1)

organize and manage effective reading instruction appropriate across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;

(2)

implement a variety of appropriate grouping strategies including individual, small group, and whole group reading instruction;

(3)

implement and reflect on the use of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, which support the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(4)

understand and apply instructional and informational technologies, digital literacy, and electronic resources to support literacy;

(5)

identify, secure, and use high-quality literature, which meets the interest and reading needs of all readers and represents various cultures and genres;

(6)

understand the rationale for using a wide range of texts and show evidence of using multiple texts within instruction, including informational texts, content area texts, electronic texts, and nonprint materials;

(7)

understand the structures of texts, both print and electronic, and the challenges presented by these materials, and use this knowledge in lesson design to match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers and across the curriculum; and

(8)

demonstrate competency through a variety of clinical experiences with elementary, middle, and high school students.

C.

A teacher of reading must be able to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction:

(1)

understand the principles surrounding a wide variety of instruments, their purposes, strengths, and limitations;

(2)

select appropriate tools for specific situations that includes assessment for diagnosis and progress monitoring;

(3)

demonstrate expertise in the administration and interpretation of a wide variety of measures that track student progress by individual, class, cohort, and school;

(4)

demonstrate expertise in using assessment information to plan differentiated classroom instruction for students, including those at different cognitive and developmental stages, and those from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds;

(5)

use assessment data to develop interventions that address specific student needs;

(6)

select materials, identify appropriate instructional strategies, and allocate resources needed to implement interventions and remediations; and

(7)

communicate results of assessments, students, parents, caregivers, colleagues, and administrators.

D.

A teacher of reading must be able to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments including:

(1)

use students' interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading program and provide authentic reasons to read and write;

(2)

support students and colleagues in the selection of materials, print and electronic, that match students' reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

develop and implement classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4)

integrate technology into reading instruction to create and maintain an environment that includes conventional and new literacies and ensures equity of access to technology;

(5)

create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students;

(6)

promote a shared vision that all students can learn literacy regardless of their cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(7)

use literature to engage students in dialogue, critical thinking, and reflection around issues of social justice;

(8)

promote critical literacy by encouraging student to question what they are reading while analyzing texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives; and

(9)

understand the importance of and facilitate home school connections.

E.

A teacher of reading must view professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility including:

(1)

serve as a role model and display positive attitudes toward literacy in the district/building by engaging in reading and writing practices;

(2)

promote and facilitate ongoing self-reflection related to teaching and student learning;

(3)

seek to be well informed and share up-to-date knowledge of literacy learning with colleagues;

(4)

apply aspects of coaching feedback to instructional practice;

(5)

actively seek opportunities to participate in learning communities and professional organizations;

(6)

collaborate with and provide guidance for colleagues who seek classroom instruction support in reading;

(7)

engage in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs; and

(8)

understand current state and federal legislation as it relates to reading.

Subp. 4.

Professional license.

A professional license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing licensure.

Subp. 5.

Effective date.

The requirements in this part for licensure as a teacher of reading are effective on September 1, 2010, and thereafter.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

26 SR 700; 30 SR 943; 34 SR 595; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22; 43 SR 463

Published Electronically:

October 30, 2018