MN Legislature

Menu

Revisor of Statutes Menu

Authenticate

Pdf

Minnesota Administrative Rules

8710.4550 LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALISTS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A library media specialist is authorized to provide to students in kindergarten through grade 12 instruction that is designed to provide information and technology literacy skills instruction, to lead, collaborate, and consult with other classroom teachers for the purpose of integrating information and technology literacy skills with content teaching, and to administer media center operations, programming, and resources.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure as a library media specialist shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of library media specialists in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a library media specialist must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to F.

A.

A library media specialist develops and implements an information media program that reflects the vision, mission, and goals of the school. The specialist must:

(1)

identify and apply current educational research, theory, and practice;

(2)

use a research and knowledge base to determine the role of information and technology tools for communication;

(3)

collaborate in developing short-range and long-range plans for the information media program;

(4)

demonstrate basic knowledge of computers and related technology and peripherals, including hardware, software, file management, care of equipment, and security;

(5)

demonstrate basic knowledge of computer-based productivity applications;

(6)

demonstrate basic knowledge of digital communications applications, which can include graphics and multimedia production;

(7)

demonstrate basic knowledge of methods to manage technology, information resources, user access, and applications in an education setting;

(8)

demonstrate ability to evaluate, select, and apply appropriate hardware, software, and other resources; and

(9)

demonstrate the knowledge needed to develop information and technology literacy curriculum.

B.

A library media specialist develops and implements an information and technology literacy program that is an integral part of the total curriculum. The specialist must:

(1)

participate in curriculum development with teachers across grade levels and disciplines;

(2)

plan and conduct a sequential integrated program of instruction in the use of information and technology tools for research and communication;

(3)

collaborate with teachers of early childhood through adult students to design, implement, and assess learning activities to meet specific learning objectives;

(4)

guide students in locating, processing, critically evaluating, and communicating information and to assess the processes and products of the learning;

(5)

provide reading, viewing, and listening guidance appropriate to the students' interests, goals, needs, and abilities;

(6)

provide leadership and staff development in effective use of technologies, strategies, and resources;

(7)

assist teachers in the selection and evaluation of resources;

(8)

consider the developmentally appropriate level, format, and curricular objectives in the design and production of media; and

(9)

formulate and conduct student learning activities that integrate the use of information and technology tools, including the legal context, ethics, and online safety issues inherent in the use of technology for learning and communication and the changeable nature of these technologies.

C.

A library media specialist develops and implements information media program policies and procedures consistent with principles of professional practice and appropriate to the mission and goals of the school and district. The specialist must:

(1)

monitor needs, usage, and trends to structure and justify program budgets;

(2)

administer program budgets in a fiscally sound manner;

(3)

develop a collection based on curriculum and learner needs;

(4)

acquire, process, organize, maintain, circulate, and inventory resources;

(5)

identify and acquire resources beyond the media center to expand information access;

(6)

identify personnel needs and supervise personnel;

(7)

consult and participate in the planning of the media center facility;

(8)

consult and participate in the design of school facilities so that information and technology tools can be used;

(9)

evaluate program, facilities, and resource collections;

(10)

develop and monitor information technology policies and procedures to protect constitutional and statutory rights; and

(11)

establish and maintain a learning environment in the media center.

D.

A library media specialist initiates and maintains motivating environments that foster the continued professional growth of the learning community. The specialist must:

(1)

model and teach responsible and ethical access to and use of information;

(2)

interpret and promote the information and technology literacy program;

(3)

disseminate pertinent information about educational and technological trends and legal developments; and

(4)

provide leadership in incorporating research referenced innovations.

E.

A library media specialist must demonstrate an understanding of the teaching of information and technology literacy that integrates understanding of information media with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The library media specialist for children, preadolescents, and adolescents shall:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of information and technology literacy and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities; and

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.

F.

A library media specialist must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

foundational theories related to practices and materials used in the classroom;

(b)

the relationships between and among print processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest, digital literacy, and how those relationships impact comprehension;

(c)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(d)

the role and rationale in using literature and other texts including electronic texts and nonprint materials across the curriculum;

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

the appropriate applications of a wide variety of instructional frameworks that are effective in meeting the needs of readers in intermediate, middle school, and high school settings across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;

(b)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand content area texts and digital content and spur student interest in more complex reading materials; and

(c)

the ability to develop critical literacy skills by encouraging students to question texts and analyze texts from multiple viewpoints or perspectives;

(3)

the ability to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge; use of instructional practices, approaches, and methods; curriculum materials; and the appropriate use of assessments, including:

(a)

understanding how to create a literacy rich environment that includes a variety of texts, print and digital, student artifacts, literacy instructional supports, and a physical arrangement that promotes literacy learning;

(b)

the ability to create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students; and

(c)

the ability to model and reinforce reading and writing as valued and purposeful lifelong activities; and

(4)

a view of professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility including:

(a)

displaying positive dispositions toward the act of reading and the teaching of reading, including a belief that all students can learn to read regardless of their cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(b)

seeking to be well informed and up-to-date in knowledge of content area literacies;

(c)

actively seeking opportunities to participate in learning communities and professional organizations; and

(d)

developing and maintaining collegial relations to support literacy initiatives across various communities within a district or school and maximize student learning.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for library media specialist licensure must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: kindergarten through grade 6, grades 5 through 8, and grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017

700 State Office Building, 100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul, MN 55155 ♦ Phone: (651) 296-2868 ♦ TTY: 1-800-627-3529 ♦ Fax: (651) 296-0569