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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.4200 TEACHERS OF BUSINESS.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of business is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to develop understanding of the functional areas of business including management, sales and marketing, finance, accounting, human resources, and information systems; the factors that affect business including economics, international business, business law, and technology; and the personal and work skills of communications and interpersonal relations, data interpretation and management, computation, collaboration and group process, and career development and transitions.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach business to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8700.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of business in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of business must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to F.

A.

A teacher of business has an integrated understanding of the functional areas of business from the perspective of the consumer, the employee, the business manager, and the entrepreneur. The teacher of business must understand:

(1)

business organization and management, including the functions of management; historical and contemporary management theories; characteristics and the advantages and disadvantages of the major forms of business organizations; organizational structures and principles; the role of ethics in management; the impact and relationship of government regulations and community involvement to business management decisions; and the role of organized labor and its influence on government and business;

(2)

sales and marketing, including roles of marketing and the impact of marketing on the individual, business, and society; the role and application of ethics in marketing; external factors that influence or dictate marketing decisions; product development and forecasting principles and methods for determining sales potential; role of pricing in the marketing process and the use of various pricing strategies; distribution processes and methods in developing distribution plans; general forms of promotion and how each contributes to successful marketing; market research development, implementation, and evaluation; marketing variables and strategies in dealing with a diversified marketplace; the components of a comprehensive marketing plan; principles of selling and merchandising; and the function of retailing and wholesaling;

(3)

financing, including the influence of internal and external factors, including stock market implications, on corporate financial data and how this data is used to make long-term and short-term management decisions; traditional sources for securing financing; the relationships among price, market share, and profitability; personal financial resource management and how more individual wants and needs can be satisfied by wise consumer decision making; the functions of commercial paper, insurance, secured transactions, and bankruptcy; the role of credit and the impact of long-term and short-term credit; and different types of budget processes;

(4)

accounting, including the accounting cycle and the purposes of each component of the cycle, methods for determining the value of assets, liabilities, and owner's equity according to generally accepted accounting principles and when and why they are used; how to prepare, interpret, and analyze financial statements using manual and computerized systems for service, merchandising, and manufacturing businesses; and the use of planning and control principles to evaluate the performance of an organization and apply differential analysis and present value concepts to make decisions;

(5)

business information systems, including entry-level career expertise in the use of office technology and can explain the purpose, functions, and common features of contemporary office technology including:

(a)

computer technology including fundamentals of contemporary computer architecture and touch keyboarding skills to enter and manipulate text and data through word processing, database, spreadsheet, desktop publishing, and presentation graphics software;

(b)

multimedia and imaging technology;

(c)

telecommunications technology; and

(d)

the impact of information systems on society; and

(6)

human resources, including the activities of human resources management, its importance to the successful operation of an organization, and the role and importance of employment law as related to the conduct of business in the national and international marketplace.

B.

A teacher of business has a fundamental and integrated understanding of the factors that affect business from the perspective of the consumer, the employee, the business manager, and the entrepreneur. The teacher of business must understand:

(1)

economic fundamentals, including:

(a)

the role of competitive markets and the price mechanism in the production, distribution, and allocation of scarce resources, including human, capital, technological, and natural within the United States economy;

(b)

how the basic economic concepts of scarcity, opportunity cost, and trade-off influence the production, allocation, and consumption of goods and services in businesses and households, and the formulation of government domestic and international economic policy;

(c)

the linkages between gross domestic production, consumption, investment and savings, employment levels, inflation, international trade, and government policy on taxation and spending;

(d)

how the Federal Reserve System acts as our nation's central bank to promote a safe, sound money supply and how it initiates and effectuates the monetary system to allow for noninflationary economic growth;

(e)

alternative economic systems, and the philosophical assumptions supporting these alternative systems; and

(f)

the importance of, and economic interdependencies that exist in the global economy in relation to world trade, investment, and monetary flows;

(2)

international business fundamentals, including:

(a)

the role of international business and its impact on careers and doing business at the local, state, national, and international levels;

(b)

communication strategies and ethics necessary and appropriate for effective and profitable international business relations;

(c)

the role, importance, and basic concepts of international finance and risk management, international marketing, and balance of trade concepts; and

(d)

the social, cultural, political, legal, and economic factors that shape and impact the international business environment;

(3)

business law fundamentals, including:

(a)

the relationship between ethics and the law;

(b)

the sources of the law, structure of the court system, and different classifications of procedural and substantive law;

(c)

the relationships among contract law, law of sales, and consumer law;

(d)

the legal rules that apply to personal property and real property;

(e)

how advances in computer technology impact property law, contract law, criminal law, and international law; and

(f)

the role and importance of agency law and employment law as they relate to the conduct of business in the national and international marketplaces;

(4)

technology concepts that are of lasting value rather than mastery of specific hardware or software skills and knowledge, including:

(a)

understanding the fundamentals of current and emerging technological concepts including types, transmissions, storage, and display systems; and

(b)

the ability to examine the technological issues from a variety of perspectives including appropriate use, privacy, ethics, remaining current, access, and economic advantages and disadvantages.

C.

A teacher of business demonstrates the following essential workplace skills and understands how to create learning experiences that make this content meaningful to students. The teacher of business must demonstrate:

(1)

communication and interpersonal skills including the ability to:

(a)

understand how to approach communication from a systems perspective including cultural, organizational, technological, and interpersonal perspectives and how to use the system perspective to analyze and direct the choice of communication strategies and forms;

(b)

communicate in a clear, courteous, concise, and correct manner using oral communication skills, informational reading skills, written communication skills, and effective listening skills; and

(c)

apply effective human relations and interpersonal skills;

(2)

data interpretation and management skills, including the ability to acquire, evaluate, organize, maintain, and interpret and communicate information using both manual and computer technology;

(3)

computational skills, including the ability to:

(a)

use mathematical procedures to analyze and solve business problems for areas, including taxation; savings and investments; payroll records; cash management; financial statements; credit management; purchases; inventory records; depreciation, cost-recovery, and depletion; and

(b)

construct, read, and interpret and make inferences from tables, charts, and graphs;

(4)

collaboration and group process skills, including the ability to understand a holistic perspective, develop and communicate group goals, understand the role of the individual in groups, and interpret and process feedback within groups; and

(5)

career development and transition skills, including the ability to understand and apply career development theory, the job procurement process, and all forms of communication used in the successful pursuit of a career.

D.

A teacher of business understands occupational clusters within business, marketing, and information management sufficient to:

(1)

enable students to develop a perspective of career options in the business fields of management, sales and marketing, accounting and finance, information systems, or office management and administrative support;

(2)

gain understanding of the basic purposes, issues, skills, nature of work, and major concepts that undergird employment in one or more occupations centrally associated with applying academic business content;

(3)

establish activities that allow students to understand individual work in the context of broader business goals;

(4)

organize instruction that enables students to more effectively learn how to acquire skills, gain a perspective on a career, and embark on the first job; and

(5)

understand the unique characteristics of an entrepreneur and the special skills of entrepreneurship associated with starting, owning, and managing a business.

E.

A teacher of business must be able to integrate understanding business with the understanding of pedagogy, students, learning environments, and professional development. The teacher of business to preadolescent and adolescent students must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

know how to develop curriculum goals based on the central concepts of the business and how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding of this discipline;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand key legislation germane to business education and school-to-work transition programming;

(6)

understand fiscal, budgetary, and purchasing practices that focus on how to organize and equip an effective and efficient classroom including selecting and maintaining instructional materials, supplies, furniture, and technology that are consistent with the current program standards;

(7)

understand the need for and how to connect student secondary schooling experiences with the workplace or further educational opportunities;

(8)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(9)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular business activities in the teaching and learning process;

(10)

know how to access information relevant to the field of business through consumer, business, and professional organizations, publications, and journals;

(11)

know strategies for marketing the business education program, including student recruitment and retention techniques and practices; and

(12)

know how to develop and apply evaluative criteria for a business curriculum and a plan for continuous improvement.

F.

A teacher of business must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

the relationships between and among print and digital content processing abilities, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(b)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers;

(c)

the ability to understand a variety of purposes for reading texts: process, information, and aesthetic; and

(d)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach business education must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017