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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.3000 TEACHERS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of early childhood education is authorized to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate learning experiences for young children from birth through grade 3 in a variety of early childhood settings and to collaborate with families, colleagues, and related service personnel to enhance the learning of all young children.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure in early childhood education for teaching young children from birth through age eight shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by the regional association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of early childhood education in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of early childhood education must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to L.

A.

A teacher of infant or toddler-aged, preprimary-aged, and primary-aged children must understand child development and learning, including:

(1)

the research base for and the best practices of early childhood education;

(2)

the physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, and creative development of young children from birth through age eight;

(3)

how young children differ in their development and approaches to learning to support the development and learning of individual children;

(4)

the major theories of early childhood development and learning and their implications for practice with young children and families from birth through age eight;

(5)

the concepts of "belonging" and "family connectedness" as crucial to the development of young children;

(6)

that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture, and society; and

(7)

the interrelationships among culture, language, and thought and the function of the home language in the development of young children.

B.

A teacher of infants and toddlers plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the unique developmental milestones associated with young infants 0 to 9 months, mobile infants 8 to 18 months, and toddlers 16 to 36 months;

(2)

the need to build and maintain a primary care relationship with each infant and toddler;

(3)

how to build and maintain positive care giving relationships with infants and toddlers in groups;

(4)

how to use observation skills to determine infants' and toddlers' needs, interests, preferences, and particular ways of responding to people and things;

(5)

strategies for developing an appropriate learning environment that:

(a)

meet the physical needs of infants and toddlers through small and large group muscle play, feeding, diapering and toileting, and rest, including:

i.

health and safety procedures and universal precautions to limit the spread of infectious diseases;

ii.

symptoms of common illness and environmental hazards;

iii.

how to evaluate infant and toddler environments to ensure the physical and emotional safety of children in care; and

iv.

how to use environmental factors and conditions to promote the health, safety, and physical development of infants and toddlers;

(b)

use scheduling and daily routines to meet infants' and toddlers' needs for balance in predictable active and quiet activities, social and solitary experiences, reliable transitions, and rest;

(c)

use educational materials for infants and toddlers that balance needs for growing independence and active exploration with the need for safety and health;

(d)

create learning experiences that incorporate the infants' and toddlers' cultural and home experiences; and

(e)

use guidance and management techniques to accommodate the developmental characteristics of infants and toddlers and to support their need for a sense of security and self-esteem;

(6)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of cognitive development and how to use this information to establish individual cognitive development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

facilitate the acquisition of skills to acquire, organize, and use information in increasingly complex ways;

(b)

create experiences that enable infants and toddlers to use play as an organizer between the acquisition and use of information;

(c)

encourage curiosity and exploration;

(d)

support development of language and communication skills;

(e)

provide opportunities for infants and toddlers to use self-initiated repetition to practice newly acquired skills and to experience feelings of autonomy and success;

(f)

enhance infants' and toddlers' emerging knowledge of cause and effect and spatial relations;

(g)

encourage self-expression through developmentally appropriate music, movement, dramatic, and creative art experiences; and

(h)

provide a foundation for literacy and numeracy development through daily exposure to books, stories, language experiences, and activities that involve object relationships;

(7)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of social and emotional development and how to use this information to establish individual social and emotional development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

establish environments in which responsive and predictable interaction sequences occur;

(b)

structure the classroom to promote positive, constructive interactions between and among children;

(c)

promote healthy peer relationships;

(d)

adapt a pattern of care to meet infants' and toddlers' rapidly changing needs;

(e)

emphasize caregiving routines that allow for interaction and visual and tactile learning;

(f)

facilitate the development of infants' and toddlers' self-esteem; and

(g)

provide continuity and consistency of affectionate care for infants and toddlers;

(8)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of physical development and how to use this information to establish individual physical development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

foster a positive attitude toward activity;

(b)

enhance infants' and toddlers' perceptual skills, balance and coordination, and flexibility, strength, and endurance; and

(c)

create environments that provide opportunities for active physical exploration and the development of emerging fine and gross motor skills;

(9)

strategies for assessing an infant's or toddler's emerging level of creative development and how to use this information to establish individual creative development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

enhance infants' and toddlers' abilities to create their own ideas and solve problems through art, music, movement, dramatic play, and other creative activities;

(b)

develop experiences that encourage initiative, creativity, autonomy, and self-esteem, integrating adult support, comfort, and affection to facilitate these aspects of development; and

(c)

create an environment where infants and toddlers are able to explore and expand their creative abilities.

C.

A teacher of young children in preprimary classrooms plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the cognitive, social and emotional, physical, and creative development of preprimary-aged children and how children's development and learning are integrated;

(2)

the development of infants and toddlers and its effects on the learning and development of preprimary-aged children;

(3)

how to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for preprimary-aged children that:

(a)

acknowledge the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote children's development and learning;

(b)

acknowledge the developmental consequences of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, and the development of mental health, and the importance of supportive relationships;

(c)

acknowledge basic health, nutrition, and safety management practices for young children, including procedures regarding childhood illness and communicable disease;

(d)

use appropriate health appraisal procedures and how to recommend referrals to appropriate community health and social services when necessary; and

(e)

recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and know responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities;

(4)

how to plan and implement appropriate curriculum and instructional practices based on developmental knowledge of individual preprimary-aged children, the community, and the curriculum goals and content, including how to use:

(a)

developmentally appropriate methods that include play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, and inquiry experiences to help children develop curiosity, solve problems, and make decisions; and

(b)

knowledge of the sequence of development to create and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences using children's ideas, needs, interests, culture, and home experiences;

(5)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of cognitive development and how to use this information to establish individual cognitive development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

facilitate the acquisition of skills to acquire, organize, and use information in increasingly complex ways;

(b)

create experiences that enable preprimary-aged children to use play as an organizer between the acquisition and use of information;

(c)

extend children's thinking and learning and move them to higher levels of functioning;

(d)

assist children to plan, evaluate, reflect on, revisit, and build on their own experiences;

(e)

allow children to construct understanding or relationships among objects, people, and events;

(f)

encourage the use and construction of numeracy skills;

(g)

encourage the development of language and communication skills;

(h)

encourage the use and construction of literacy skills; and

(i)

allow children to construct knowledge of the physical world, manipulate objects for desired effects, and understand cause-and-effect relationships;

(6)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of social and emotional development and how to use this information to establish individual social and emotional development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

establish environments in which responsive and predictable interaction sequences occur;

(b)

structure the classroom to promote positive and constructive interactions among children;

(c)

promote healthy peer relationships;

(d)

build in each child a sense of belonging, security, personal worth, and self-confidence toward learning;

(e)

allow for the construction of social knowledge, such as cooperating, helping, negotiating, and talking with others to solve problems;

(f)

facilitate the development of self-acceptance, self-control, and social responsiveness in children through the use of positive guidance techniques; and

(g)

promote children's understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of human differences due to social, cultural, physical, or developmental factors;

(7)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of physical development and how to use this information to establish individual physical development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

foster a positive attitude toward physical activity;

(b)

enhance preprimary-aged children's perceptual skills; balance and coordination; and flexibility, strength, and endurance;

(c)

support age-appropriate risk-taking within safe boundaries;

(d)

assist children in becoming competent in acquiring basic gross and fine motor skills;

(e)

facilitate children's understanding of maintaining a desirable level of nutrition, health, fitness, and physical safety; and

(f)

meet children's physiological needs for activity, sensory stimulation, fresh air, rest, hygiene, and nourishment and elimination; and

(8)

strategies for assessing a preprimary-aged child's emerging level of creative development and how to use this information to establish individual creative development goals and design developmentally appropriate learning experiences that:

(a)

help children develop and sustain curiosity about the world including past, present, and future events, trends, relationships, and understandings;

(b)

build children's confidence, creativity, imagination, personal expression of thoughts and feelings, initiative, and persistence in task completion;

(c)

encourage children to express ideas and feelings;

(d)

provide children with opportunities to use materials in self-selected and self-directed ways;

(e)

use open-ended activities to reinforce positive self-esteem and individuality among children; and

(f)

promote shared problem solving, creativity, and conceptual integration among children.

D.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades plans, designs, and implements developmentally appropriate learning experiences. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the cognitive, social and emotional, physical, and creative development of primary-aged children and how children's development and learning are integrated;

(2)

how to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for primary-aged children that:

(a)

acknowledge the influence of the physical setting, scheduling, routines, and transitions on children and use these experiences to promote young children's development and learning;

(b)

acknowledge developmental consequences of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, and the development of mental health and the acceptance of supportive relationships;

(c)

acknowledge basic health, nutrition, and safety management practices for primary-aged children, including procedures regarding childhood illness and communicable diseases; and

(d)

recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse, and neglect in young children and know responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities;

(3)

how to create learning environments that emphasize play, active manipulation of concrete materials, child choice and decision making, exploration of the environment, and interactions with others;

(4)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching language and literacy, including how to:

(a)

use teaching practices that support and enhance literacy development at all developmental levels;

(b)

use appropriate techniques for broadening the listening, speaking, reading, and writing vocabularies of primary-aged children;

(c)

develop primary-aged children's ability to use spoken, visual, and written language to communicate with a variety of audiences for different purposes; and

(d)

communicate with adult caregivers of primary-aged children about concepts of language and literacy development and age-appropriate learning materials;

(5)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching mathematics, including:

(a)

the use and understanding of mathematics and of how primary-aged children learn mathematics to guide instruction that develops children's understanding of number sense and number systems, geometry, and measurement;

(b)

planning activities that develop primary-aged children's understanding of mathematics and increases their ability to apply mathematics to everyday problems;

(c)

helping primary-aged children experience mathematics as a way to explore and solve problems in their environment at home and in school through open-ended work that includes child-invented strategies with different problems, games, and authentic situations;

(d)

selecting and creating a variety of resources, materials, and activities for counting and studying patterns and mathematical relationships;

(e)

building learning environments where children can construct their own knowledge for learning mathematics;

(f)

providing objects, counters, charts, graphs, and other materials to help primary-aged children express ideas, and represent and record problem solving through numbers and symbols;

(g)

using field trips, science experiments, cooking and snack times, sports, and games to use mathematics to solve problems, to symbolize phenomena and relationships, and to communicate quantitative information; and

(h)

asking questions to clarify how primary-aged children perceive a problem, develop a strategy, and understand different approaches to reasoning and thinking in mathematics;

(6)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching science, including:

(a)

supporting primary-aged children's enthusiasm, wonder, and curiosity about the world and increase their understanding of the world;

(b)

building on primary-aged children's capabilities for using their senses to acquire information by examining, exploring, comparing, classifying, describing, and asking questions about materials and events in their environment;

(c)

creating engaging and useful interdisciplinary projects that introduce primary-aged children to the major ideas of science;

(d)

encouraging primary-aged children to make predictions, gather and classify data, carry out investigations, make observations, and test ideas about natural phenomena and materials; and

(e)

designing experiences to help primary-aged children construct and build their knowledge of science;

(7)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching social studies, including:

(a)

building on primary-aged children's experiences in their classrooms, homes, and communities to enrich understandings about social relationships and phenomena;

(b)

leading primary-aged children to examine and discuss similarities, common interests, and needs and important differences among peoples, communities, and nations; and

(c)

promoting social development, democratic ideals, civic values, cooperative relationships, and mutual respect within the school community while helping primary-aged children grow as citizens;

(8)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching visual and performing arts, including:

(a)

providing primary-aged children with the time, materials, and opportunities to explore, manipulate, and create using a variety of media;

(b)

providing primary-aged children with experiences producing, discussing, and enjoying various forms of the arts, including visual art, music, creative drama, and dance;

(c)

enabling primary-aged children to understand how the arts represent different ways to perceive and interpret the world;

(d)

promoting primary-aged children's knowledge of various criteria for evaluating the arts; and

(e)

using a variety of artistic materials and techniques for discussing, experiencing, and thinking about important and interesting questions and phenomena with primary-aged children; and

(9)

the central concepts and tools of inquiry for teaching health and physical education, including:

(a)

providing experiences to encourage personal and community health promotion, disease prevention, and safety;

(b)

applying movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills; and

(c)

encouraging the development of a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.

E.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes, development, and instruction, including:

(1)

oral and written language development, including:

(a)

relationships among reading, writing, and oral language and the interdependent nature of reading, writing, listening, and speaking to promote reading proficiency;

(b)

the use of formal and informal oral language and writing opportunities across the curriculum to help students make connections between their oral language and reading and writing, particularly English learners; and

(c)

the interrelated elements of language arts instruction that support the reading development of English learners, including ways in which the writing systems of other languages may differ from English and factors and processes involved in transferring literacy competencies from one language to another;

(2)

phonological and phonemic awareness, including:

(a)

the phonemes that make up the English language;

(b)

the ways in which reading achievement is related to phonological and phonemic awareness, including the ability to recognize word boundaries; to rhyme; and to blend, segment, substitute, and delete sounds in words; and

(c)

the instructional progression of phonological awareness, for example, words, syllables, onsets and rimes, and phonemes;

(3)

concepts about print, including:

(a)

knowledge about how letters, words, and sentences are represented in written English;

(b)

the importance of teaching uppercase and lowercase letter recognition and formation; and

(c)

the instructional progression of the alphabetic principle;

(4)

phonics and other word identification strategies and fluency, including:

(a)

systematic, explicit phonics instruction that is sequenced according to the increasing complexity of linguistic units;

(b)

word identification strategies and common, irregular sight words;

(c)

the stages of spelling development and systematic planning for spelling instruction related to the stages of spelling development;

(d)

how the etymology and morphology of words relate to orthographic patterns in English; and

(e)

the development of reading fluency;

(5)

knowledge of how to develop vocabulary knowledge, including:

(a)

understanding the critical role vocabulary knowledge plays in reading;

(b)

how to provide explicit instruction in vocabulary development and how to determine the meaning and accurate use of unfamiliar words encountered through listening and reading; and

(c)

how to provide opportunities to engage in early and continual language experiences to increase vocabulary by modeling and explicitly teaching students a variety of strategies for gaining meaning from unfamiliar words;

(6)

comprehension processes related to reading, including:

(a)

knowledge of how proficient readers read, how to facilitate listening comprehension, and how to develop comprehension of print material;

(b)

the levels of comprehension, how to explicitly teach and provide guided practice in comprehension skills and strategies; and

(c)

how to facilitate comprehension at various stages of reading development by selecting and using a range of texts, activities, and strategies before, during, and after reading;

(7)

content-area literacy, including:

(a)

knowledge of reading comprehension processes necessary to comprehend different types of informational materials and content-area texts; and

(b)

the structures and features of expository (informational) texts and effective reading strategies to address different text structures and purposes for reading;

(8)

literary response and analysis, including:

(a)

knowledge of how to provide frequent opportunities to listen to and read high-quality literature for different purposes;

(b)

knowledge of how to select, evaluate, and respond to literature from a range of genres, eras, perspectives, and cultures; and

(c)

knowledge of how to analyze and teach literary text structures and elements and criticism drawing upon literature and instructional needs and interests; and

(9)

structure of the English language, including:

(a)

basic knowledge of English conventions and the structure of the English language (sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, syntax, and semantics);

(b)

knowledge of how to enhance literacy skills including helping students understand similarities and differences between language structures used in spoken and written English;

(c)

basic knowledge of English syntax and semantics and the ability to use this knowledge to improve reading competence including how to help students interpret and apply English grammar and language conventions in authentic reading, writing, listening, and speaking contexts; and

(d)

knowledge of how to help students consolidate knowledge of English grammar and improve reading fluency and comprehension by providing frequent opportunities to listen to, read, and reread materials.

F.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of and ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction, including:

(1)

appropriate, motivating instruction, both explicit and implicit, in:

(a)

oral language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, phonemic awareness, and word awareness;

(c)

the teaching of phonics, sight words, spelling, and fluency, including the selection, design, and use of instructional programs, materials, texts, and activities; and

(d)

applying a variety of reading comprehension strategies to different types of informational materials and content-area texts including teaching the structures and features of expository texts;

(2)

selection, design, and use of appropriate and engaging instructional strategies, activities, and materials, including:

(a)

multisensory techniques to ensure that students learn concepts about print including how to recognize and write letters;

(b)

teaching vocabulary using a range of instructional activities to extend students' understanding of words;

(c)

teaching comprehension skills and strategies, including opportunities for guided and independent work;

(3)

selection and appropriate use of a wide range of engaging texts representing various genres and cultures when designing reading lessons; the ability to facilitate and develop students' responses to literature and critical reading abilities through high level, interactive discussions about texts;

(4)

selection and appropriate explicit instruction and guided practice to teach written-language structures using a range of approaches and activities to develop the students' facility to comprehend and use academic language;

(5)

development of a literacy framework to coherently organize reading programs and effectively implement lessons, including a variety of grouping strategies, guided practice, and independent work; and

(6)

the ability to design purposeful lessons and tasks based on the qualities, structures, and difficulty of texts and the reading needs of individual students, including the selection and use of supplementary materials to support the reading development of struggling and gifted readers.

G.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have knowledge of and ability to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, including:

(1)

formal and informal tools to assess students':

(a)

oral and written language development;

(b)

auditory awareness, discrimination of sounds, and phonological and phonemic awareness;

(c)

understanding of concepts about print and the alphabetic principle;

(d)

knowledge of and skills in applying phonics and other word identification strategies, spelling strategies, and fluency;

(e)

vocabulary knowledge in relation to specific reading needs and texts;

(f)

comprehension of narrative and expository texts and the use of comprehension strategies, including determining independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels;

(g)

comprehension in content-area reading;

(h)

the ability to evaluate and respond to a range of literature and analyze text structures and elements; and

(i)

oral and written language to determine the understanding and use of English language structures and conventions;

(2)

formal and informal tools to:

(a)

plan, evaluate, and differentiate instruction to meet the needs of students from various cognitive, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds; and

(b)

design and implement appropriate classroom interventions for struggling readers and enrichment programs for gifted readers;

(3)

the ability to work with reading specialists, gifted and talented specialists, and other staff on advanced intervention and enrichment programs;

(4)

the ability to communicate results of assessments to specific individuals in accurate and coherent ways that indicate how the results might impact student achievement;

(5)

the ability to administer selected assessments and analyze and use data to plan instruction through a structured clinical experience linked to university reading course work; and

(6)

the ability to understand the appropriate uses of each kind of assessment and the concepts of validity and reliability.

H.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must have the ability to create a literate and motivating environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments, including:

(1)

knowledge of how to use interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading program and provide authentic reasons to read and write;

(2)

the ability to support students and colleagues in the selection or design of materials that match reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

the development and implementation of classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4)

the ability to create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment and teacher and student interactions that promote ongoing engagement and literacy for all students;

(5)

the ability to foster independence and self-efficacy in readers;

(6)

the development of independent reading by encouraging and guiding students in selecting independent reading materials, promoting extensive independent reading by providing daily opportunities for self-selected reading and frequent opportunities for sharing what is read; and motivating students to read independently by regularly reading aloud and providing access to a variety of reading materials; and

(7)

the use of a variety of strategies to motivate students to read at home; encourage and provide support for parents or guardians to read to their children, in English or in the primary languages of English learners; and to use additional strategies to promote literacy in the home.

I.

A teacher of young children in the primary grades must demonstrate a view of professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility, including:

(1)

exhibiting a particular stance towards professional development. Beginning teachers view learning about reading processes and reading development, and becoming more proficient as a teacher of reading, as a career-long effort and responsibility;

(2)

displaying positive dispositions toward the act of reading and the teaching of reading, including a belief that all students can learn to read regardless of cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds;

(3)

providing support for reading development by communicating regularly with parents or caregivers and eliciting support in reading development;

(4)

understanding how to provide instructions for paraprofessionals and volunteers working in the classroom to ensure that these individuals provide effective supplementary reading instruction;

(5)

engaging in personal learning as a daily and long-term goal to inform instructional practices, including reflection on practices, to improve daily instructional decisions and interactions with students; and

(6)

collaborate with other professionals on literacy learning initiatives.

J.

A teacher of young children establishes and maintains positive, collaborative relationships with families. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the need to respect families' choices and goals for their children and the need to communicate with families about curriculum and their children's progress;

(2)

the need to be sensitive to differences in family structures and social and cultural backgrounds;

(3)

theories of families and dynamics, roles, and relationships within families and between families and communities;

(4)

how to support families in assessing educational options and in making decisions related to child development and parenting; and

(5)

how to link families with a range of family-oriented services based on identified resources, priorities, and concerns.

K.

A teacher of young children uses informal and formal assessment and evaluation strategies to plan and individualize curriculum and teaching practices. The teacher must understand:

(1)

observing, recording, and assessing young children's development and learning and engage children in self-assessment;

(2)

using information gained by observation of family dynamics and relationships to support the child's learning;

(3)

using assessment results to identify needs and learning styles and to plan appropriate programs, environments, and interactions; and

(4)

developing and using formative and summative program evaluation instruments to enhance and maintain comprehensive program quality for children, families, and the community.

L.

A teacher of young children understands historical and contemporary development of early childhood education. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the multiple historical, philosophical, and social foundations of early childhood education and how these foundations influence current thought and practice; and

(2)

the effects of societal conditions on children and families, and current issues and trends, legal issues, and legislation and other public policies affecting children, families, and programs for young children and the early childhood profession.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of early childhood education must have a variety of field experiences which must include at least 100 school-based or home-based hours prior to student teaching that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at three levels: infant/toddler, preschool, and kindergarten through grade 3 within a range of educational programming models.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in no more than two placements, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing licensure.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board rules governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017