Skip to main content Skip to office menu Skip to footer
Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

Key: (1) language to be deleted (2) new language

CHAPTER 12--H.F.No. 13

An act

relating to legislative enactments; correcting miscellaneous oversights, inconsistencies, ambiguities, unintended results, and technical errors;

amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 116J.8737, subdivision 5, as amended, if enacted; Laws 2019, chapter 64, article 1, section 3, subdivision 3; 2019 First Special Session H.F. No. 2, article 1, section 2, subdivision 2, if enacted; 2019 First Special Session S.F. No. 7, article 1, section 2, subdivision 2, if enacted; 2019 First Special Session S.F. 12, articles 2, section 72, if enacted; 14, sections 3, subdivision 2, if enacted; 11, if enacted.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA:

Section 1.

Laws 2019, chapter 64, article 1, section 3, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3.

Operations and Maintenance

721,490,000 728,470,000

(a) The Board of Trustees must establish tuition rates as follows:

(1) for the 2019-2020 academic year, the tuition rate at colleges must not exceed the 2018-2019 academic year rate by more than three percent, and for the 2020-2021 academic year, the tuition rate must not exceed the 2019-2020 academic year rate by more than three percent;

(2) for the 2019-2020 academic year, the tuition rates for undergraduates at universities must not exceed the 2018-2019 academic year rate by more than three percent, except as provided under clause (3), and for the 2020-2021 academic year, the tuition rate must not exceed the 2019-2020 academic year rate by more than three percent;

(3) for the 2019-2020 academic year, the university with the lowest 2018-2019 academic year banded tuition rate may increase its tuition to a tuition rate up to or equal to the 2019-2020 academic year tuition rate of the university with the second lowest 2018-2019 academic year banded tuition rate. For the 2020-2021 academic year, the tuition rate must not exceed the 2019-2020 academic year rate by more than three percent; and

(4) for the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 academic years, the differential tuition rate for online courses must not exceed the 2018-2019 academic year rate.

The student tuition relief may not be offset by increases in mandatory fees, charges, or other assessments to the student. Except under clause (4), colleges and universities are permitted to increase differential tuition charges in fiscal years 2020 and 2021 where costs for course or program delivery have increased due to extraordinary circumstances beyond the control of the college or university. Rates and rationale must be approved by the Board of Trustees.

(b) $3,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $3,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to provide supplemental aid for operations and maintenance to the president of each two-year institution in the system with at least one campus that is not located in a metropolitan county, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 4. The board shall transfer $100,000 for each campus not located in a metropolitan county in each year to the president of each institution that includes such a campus, provided that no institution may receive more than $300,000 in total supplemental aid each year.

(c) The Board of Trustees is requested to help Minnesota close the attainment gap by funding activities which improve retention and completion for students of color.

(d) $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $6,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for workforce development scholarships under Minnesota Statutes, section 136F.38. Of this appropriation, up to $250,000 is available for the biennium to administer the program. The base for fiscal year 2022 and thereafter is $4,000,000.

(e) $300,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $300,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for transfer to the Cook County Higher Education Board to provide educational programming, workforce development, and academic support services to remote regions in northeastern Minnesota. The Cook County Higher Education Board shall continue to provide information to the Board of Trustees on the number of students served, credit hours delivered, and services provided to students.

(f) This appropriation includes $40,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $40,000 in fiscal year 2021 to implement the sexual assault policies required under Minnesota Statutes, section 135A.15.

(g) This appropriation includes $8,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $8,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 for upgrading the Integrated Statewide Record System.

(h) This appropriation includes $250,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $250,000 in fiscal year 2021 for developing and offering courses to implement the Z-Degree textbook program under Minnesota Statutes, section 136F.305. This is a onetime appropriation.

(i) This appropriation includes $500,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $500,000 in fiscal year 2021 to support local partnership programs at Minnesota State Colleges and Universities campuses. Local partnerships must be comprised of campuses and local businesses and may also include K-12 school districts, trade associations, local chambers of commerce, and economic development authorities. Funds must be used to develop new and accelerate existing employer-led workforce exposure programs, technical education pathway programs, dual-training programs, internships, youth skills training programs, and other industry-recognized programs in high-growth, high-demand industries. Priority consideration for funding shall be given to local partnerships whose program addresses an industry with a demonstrated workforce shortage. Local partnerships must demonstrate how business and industry are providing financial and in-kind contributions to the program. This is a onetime appropriation.

(j) This appropriation includes $250,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $250,000 in fiscal year 2021 for leveraged equipment acquisition. For the purposes of this section, "equipment" means equipment for instructional purposes for programs that the board has determined would produce graduates with skills for which there is a high employer need within the state. An equipment acquisition may be made using this appropriation only if matched by cash or in-kind contributions from nonstate sources. This is a onetime appropriation.

(k) $125,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $125,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for the mental health services for students required under Minnesota Statutes, section 136F.20, subdivision 3. This is a onetime appropriation.

(l) The total operations and maintenance base for fiscal year 2022 and thereafter is $725,345,000.

Sec. 2.

[CORR19-01]

Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 116J.8737, subdivision 5, as amended by 2019 First Special Session H.F. No. 5, article 2, section 5, if enacted, is amended to read:

Subd. 5.

Credit allowed.

(a) A qualified investor or qualified fund is eligible for a credit equal to 25 percent of the qualified investment in a qualified small business. Investments made by a pass-through entity qualify for a credit only if the entity is a qualified fund. The commissioner must not allocate more than $10,000,000 in credits to qualified investors or qualified funds for the taxable years listed in paragraph (i). For each taxable year, 50 percent must be allocated to credits for qualifying investments in qualified greater Minnesota businesses and minority-owned, or women-owned, or veteran-owned qualified small businesses in Minnesota. Any portion of a taxable year's credits that is reserved for qualifying investments in greater Minnesota businesses and minority-owned, or women-owned, or veteran-owned qualified small businesses in Minnesota that is not allocated by September 30 of the taxable year is available for allocation to other credit applications beginning on October 1. Any portion of a taxable year's credits that is not allocated by the commissioner does not cancel and may be carried forward to subsequent taxable years until all credits have been allocated.

(b) The commissioner may not allocate more than a total maximum amount in credits for a taxable year to a qualified investor for the investor's cumulative qualified investments as an individual qualified investor and as an investor in a qualified fund; for married couples filing joint returns the maximum is $250,000, and for all other filers the maximum is $125,000. The commissioner may not allocate more than a total of $1,000,000 in credits over all taxable years for qualified investments in any one qualified small business.

(c) The commissioner may not allocate a credit to a qualified investor either as an individual qualified investor or as an investor in a qualified fund if, at the time the investment is proposed:

(1) the investor is an officer or principal of the qualified small business; or

(2) the investor, either individually or in combination with one or more members of the investor's family, owns, controls, or holds the power to vote 20 percent or more of the outstanding securities of the qualified small business.

A member of the family of an individual disqualified by this paragraph is not eligible for a credit under this section. For a married couple filing a joint return, the limitations in this paragraph apply collectively to the investor and spouse. For purposes of determining the ownership interest of an investor under this paragraph, the rules under section 267(c) and 267(e) of the Internal Revenue Code apply.

(d) Applications for tax credits for 2010 must be made available on the department's website by September 1, 2010, and the department must begin accepting applications by September 1, 2010. Applications for subsequent years must be made available by November 1 of the preceding year.

(e) Qualified investors and qualified funds must apply to the commissioner for tax credits. Tax credits must be allocated to qualified investors or qualified funds in the order that the tax credit request applications are filed with the department. The commissioner must approve or reject tax credit request applications within 15 days of receiving the application. The investment specified in the application must be made within 60 days of the allocation of the credits. If the investment is not made within 60 days, the credit allocation is canceled and available for reallocation. A qualified investor or qualified fund that fails to invest as specified in the application, within 60 days of allocation of the credits, must notify the commissioner of the failure to invest within five business days of the expiration of the 60-day investment period.

(f) All tax credit request applications filed with the department on the same day must be treated as having been filed contemporaneously. If two or more qualified investors or qualified funds file tax credit request applications on the same day, and the aggregate amount of credit allocation claims exceeds the aggregate limit of credits under this section or the lesser amount of credits that remain unallocated on that day, then the credits must be allocated among the qualified investors or qualified funds who filed on that day on a pro rata basis with respect to the amounts claimed. The pro rata allocation for any one qualified investor or qualified fund is the product obtained by multiplying a fraction, the numerator of which is the amount of the credit allocation claim filed on behalf of a qualified investor and the denominator of which is the total of all credit allocation claims filed on behalf of all applicants on that day, by the amount of credits that remain unallocated on that day for the taxable year.

(g) A qualified investor or qualified fund, or a qualified small business acting on their behalf, must notify the commissioner when an investment for which credits were allocated has been made, and the taxable year in which the investment was made. A qualified fund must also provide the commissioner with a statement indicating the amount invested by each investor in the qualified fund based on each investor's share of the assets of the qualified fund at the time of the qualified investment. After receiving notification that the investment was made, the commissioner must issue credit certificates for the taxable year in which the investment was made to the qualified investor or, for an investment made by a qualified fund, to each qualified investor who is an investor in the fund. The certificate must state that the credit is subject to revocation if the qualified investor or qualified fund does not hold the investment in the qualified small business for at least three years, consisting of the calendar year in which the investment was made and the two following years. The three-year holding period does not apply if:

(1) the investment by the qualified investor or qualified fund becomes worthless before the end of the three-year period;

(2) 80 percent or more of the assets of the qualified small business is sold before the end of the three-year period;

(3) the qualified small business is sold before the end of the three-year period;

(4) the qualified small business's common stock begins trading on a public exchange before the end of the three-year period; or

(5) the qualified investor dies before the end of the three-year period.

(h) The commissioner must notify the commissioner of revenue of credit certificates issued under this section.

(i) The credit allowed under this subdivision is effective for each of the following taxable years:

(1) taxable years beginning after December 31, 2018, and before January 1, 2020; and

(2) taxable years beginning after December 31, 2020, and before January 1, 2022.

EFFECTIVE DATE.

This section is effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2018.

Sec. 3.

[CORR19-02]

2019 First Special Session S.F. No. 7, article 1, section 2, subdivision 2, if enacted, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Environmental Analysis and Outcomes

13,277,00013,308,000
Appropriations by Fund
20202021
General205,000205,000
Environmental12,871,00012,902,000
Remediation201,000201,000

(a) $89,000 the first year and $89,000 the second year are for:

(1) a municipal liaison to assist municipalities in implementing and participating in the rulemaking process for water quality standards and navigating the NPDES/SDS permitting process;

(2) enhanced economic analysis in the rulemaking process for water quality standards, including more-specific analysis and identification of cost-effective permitting;

(3) developing statewide economic analyses and templates to reduce the amount of information and time required for municipalities to apply for variances from water quality standards; and

(4) coordinating with the Public Facilities Authority to identify and advocate for the resources needed for municipalities to achieve permit requirements.

(b) $205,000 the first year and $205,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for a monitoring program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.454.

(c) $115,000 the first year and $115,000 the second year are for monitoring water quality and operating assistance programs.

(d) $347,000 the first year and $347,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for monitoring ambient air for hazardous pollutants.

(e) $90,000 the first year and $90,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for duties related to harmful chemicals in children's products under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116.9401 to 116.9407. Of this amount, $57,000 each year is transferred to the commissioner of health.

(f) $109,000 the first year and $109,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for registering wastewater laboratories.

(g) $926,000 the first year and $926,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to continue perfluorochemical biomonitoring in eastern metropolitan communities, as recommended by the Environmental Health Tracking and Biomonitoring Advisory Panel, and to address other environmental health risks, including air quality. The communities must include Hmong and other immigrant farming communities. Of this amount, up to $689,000 the first year and $689,000 the second year are for transfer to the Department of Health.

(h) $51,000 the first year and $51,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the listing procedures for impaired waters required under this act.

(i) $141,000 the second year is from the environmental fund to implement and enforce Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.071. Of this amount, up to $65,000 each year may be transferred to the commissioner of health.

(j) $200,000 the first year is from the environmental fund for transfer to the commissioner of health for enhanced blood lead testing, lead poisoning prevention efforts, and asthma education as recommended by the Northern Metals Consent Decree Advisory Committee. This is a onetime appropriation.

(k) The base for the general fund in fiscal year 2022 and later is $204,000.

Sec. 4.

[CORR19-03]

2019 First Special Session H.F. No. 2, article 1, section 2, subdivision 2, if enacted, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Business and Community Development

44,931,00042,381,000
Appropriations by Fund
General40,756,00038,206,000
Remediation700,000700,000
Workforce Development3,475,0003,475,000

(a) $1,787,000 each year is for the greater Minnesota business development public infrastructure grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.431. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2023.

(b) $1,425,000 each year is for the business development competitive grant program. Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the business development competitive grant program. All grant awards shall be for two consecutive years. Grants shall be awarded in the first year.

(c) $1,772,000 each year is for contaminated site cleanup and development grants under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116J.551 to 116J.558. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2023.

(d) $700,000 each year is from the remediation fund for contaminated site cleanup and development grants under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116J.551 to 116J.558. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2023.

(e) $139,000 each year is for the Center for Rural Policy and Development.

(f) $25,000 each year is for the administration of state aid for the Destination Medical Center under Minnesota Statutes, sections 469.40 to 469.47.

(g) $875,000 each year is for the host community economic development program established in Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.548.

(h) $125,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for a grant to the White Earth Nation for the White Earth Nation Integrated Business Development System to provide business assistance with workforce development, outreach, technical assistance, infrastructure and operational support, financing, and other business development activities. This is a onetime appropriation.

(i) $450,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for a grant to Enterprise Minnesota, Inc. for the small business growth acceleration program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116O.115. This is a onetime appropriation.

(j) $250,000 the first year is for a grant to the Rondo Community Land Trust for improvements to leased commercial space in the Selby Milton Victoria Project that will create long-term affordable space for small businesses and for build-out and development of new businesses.

(k) $400,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for a grant to the Metropolitan Economic Development Association (MEDA) for statewide business development and assistance services, including services to entrepreneurs with businesses that have the potential to create job opportunities for unemployed and underemployed people, with an emphasis on minority-owned businesses. This is a onetime appropriation.

(l) $750,000 in fiscal year 2020 is for grants to local communities to increase the supply of quality child care providers to support economic development. At least 60 percent of grant funds must go to communities located outside of the seven-county metropolitan area as defined under Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2. Grant recipients must obtain a 50 percent nonstate match to grant funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. Grant funds available under this section must be used to implement projects to reduce the child care shortage in the state, including but not limited to funding for child care business start-ups or expansion, training, facility modifications or improvements required for licensing, and assistance with licensing and other regulatory requirements. In awarding grants, the commissioner must give priority to communities that have demonstrated a shortage of child care providers in the area. This is a onetime appropriation. Within one year of receiving grant funds, grant recipients must report to the commissioner on the outcomes of the grant program, including but not limited to the number of new providers, the number of additional child care provider jobs created, the number of additional child care slots, and the amount of cash and in-kind local funds invested.

(m) $750,000 in fiscal year 2020 is for a grant to the Minnesota Initiative Foundations. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2023. The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must use grant funds under this section to:

(1) facilitate planning processes for rural communities resulting in a community solution action plan that guides decision making to sustain and increase the supply of quality child care in the region to support economic development;

(2) engage the private sector to invest local resources to support the community solution action plan and ensure quality child care is a vital component of additional regional economic development planning processes;

(3) provide locally based training and technical assistance to rural child care business owners individually or through a learning cohort. Access to financial and business development assistance must prepare child care businesses for quality engagement and improvement by stabilizing operations, leveraging funding from other sources, and fostering business acumen that allows child care businesses to plan for and afford the cost of providing quality child care; or

(4) recruit child care programs to participate in Parent Aware, Minnesota's quality and improvement rating system, and other high quality measurement programs. The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must work with local partners to provide low-cost training, professional development opportunities, and continuing education curricula. The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must fund, through local partners, an enhanced level of coaching to rural child care providers to obtain a quality rating through Parent Aware or other high quality measurement programs.

(n)(1) $650,000 each year from the workforce development fund is for grants to the Neighborhood Development Center for small business programs. This is a onetime appropriation.

(2) Of the amount appropriated in the first year, $150,000 is for outreach and training activities outside the seven-county metropolitan area, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2.

(o) $8,000,000 each year is for the Minnesota job creation fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8748. Of this amount, the commissioner of employment and economic development may use up to three percent for administrative expenses. This appropriation is available until expended.

(p)(1) $11,970,000 each year is for the Minnesota investment fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8731. Of this amount, the commissioner of employment and economic development may use up to three percent for administration and monitoring of the program. In fiscal year 2022 and beyond, the base amount is $12,370,000. This appropriation is available until expended. Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 116.8731 116J.8731, funds appropriated to the commissioner for the Minnesota investment fund may be used for the redevelopment program under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116J.575 and 116J.5761, at the discretion of the commissioner. Grants under this paragraph are not subject to the grant amount limitation under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8731.

(2) Of the amount appropriated in the first year, $2,000,000 is for a loan to a paper mill in Duluth for a retrofit project that will support the operation and manufacture of packaging paper grades. The company that owns the paper mill must spend $20,000,000 on project activities by December 31, 2020, in order to be eligible to receive this loan. Loan funds may be used for purchases of materials, supplies, and equipment for the project and are available from July 1, 2019, to July 30, 2021. The commissioner of employment and economic development shall forgive 25 percent of the loan each year after the second year during a five-year period if the mill has retained at least 200 full-time equivalent employees and has satisfied other performance goals and contractual obligations as required under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8731.

(q) $700,000 in fiscal year 2020 is for the airport infrastructure renewal (AIR) grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.439.

(r) $100,000 in fiscal year 2020 is for a grant to FIRST in Upper Midwest to support competitive robotics teams. Funds must be used to make up to five awards of no more than $20,000 each to Minnesota-based public entities or private nonprofit organizations for the creation of competitive robotics hubs. Awards may be used for tools, equipment, and physical space to be utilized by robotics teams. At least 50 percent of grant funds must be used outside of the seven-county metropolitan area, as defined under Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2. The grant recipient shall report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over jobs and economic growth by February 1, 2021, on the status of awards and include information on the number and amount of awards made, the number of customers served, and any outcomes resulting from the grant. The grant requires a 50 percent match from nonstate sources.

(s) $1,000,000 each year is for the Minnesota emerging entrepreneur loan program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116M.18. Funds available under this paragraph are for transfer into the emerging entrepreneur program special revenue fund account created under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116M, and are available until expended. Of this amount, up to four percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.

(t) $163,000 each year is for the Minnesota Film and TV Board. The appropriation in each year is available only upon receipt by the board of $1 in matching contributions of money or in-kind contributions from nonstate sources for every $3 provided by this appropriation, except that each year up to $50,000 is available on July 1 even if the required matching contribution has not been received by that date.

(u) $12,000 each year is for a grant to the Upper Minnesota Film Office.

(v) $500,000 each year is from the general fund for a grant to the Minnesota Film and TV Board for the film production jobs program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116U.26. This appropriation is available until June 30, 2023.

(w) $4,195,000 each year is for the Minnesota job skills partnership program under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116L.01 to 116L.17. If the appropriation for either year is insufficient, the appropriation for the other year is available. This appropriation is available until expended.

(x) $1,350,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for jobs training grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.42.

(y) $2,500,000 each year is for Launch Minnesota. This is a onetime appropriation and funds are available until June 30, 2023. Of this amount:

(1) $1,600,000 each year is for innovation grants to eligible Minnesota entrepreneurs or start-up businesses to assist with their operating needs;

(2) $450,000 each year is for administration of Launch Minnesota; and

(3) $450,000 each year is for grantee activities at Launch Minnesota.

(z) $500,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for a grant to Youthprise to give grants through a competitive process to community organizations to provide economic development services designed to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency in communities with concentrated East African populations. Such communities include but are not limited to Faribault, Rochester, St. Cloud, Moorhead, and Willmar. To the extent possible, Youthprise must make at least 50 percent of these grants to organizations serving communities located outside the seven-county metropolitan area, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2.This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2022.

(aa) $125,000 each year is for a grant to the Hmong Chamber of Commerce to train ethnically Southeast Asian business owners and operators in better business practices. This is a onetime appropriation.

Sec. 5.

[CORR19-04A]

2019 First Special Session S.F. No. 12, article 2, section 72, if enacted, is amended by adding an effective date to read:

EFFECTIVE DATE.

This section is effective September 30, 2019.

Sec. 6.

[CORR19-04B]

2019 First Special Session S.F. No. 12, article 14, section 3, subdivision 2, if enacted, is amended to read:

Subd. 2.

Health Improvement

Appropriations by Fund
General 94,980,000 96,117,000
State Government Special Revenue7,614,0007,558,000
Health Care Access37,285,00036,832,000
Federal TANF11,713,00011,713,000

(a) TANF Appropriations. (1) $3,579,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $3,579,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for home visiting and nutritional services under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.882, subdivision 7, clauses (6) and (7). Funds must be distributed to community health boards according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.131, subdivision 1;

(2) $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for decreasing racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.928, subdivision 7;

(3) $4,978,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $4,978,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for the family home visiting grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17. $4,000,000 of the funding in each fiscal year must be distributed to community health boards according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.131, subdivision 1. $978,000 of the funding in each fiscal year must be distributed to tribal governments according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.14, subdivision 2a;

(4) $1,156,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $1,156,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for family planning grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.925; and

(5) The commissioner may use up to 6.23 percent of the amounts appropriated from the TANF fund each year to conduct the ongoing evaluations required under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17, subdivision 7, and training and technical assistance as required under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17, subdivisions 4 and 5.

(b) TANF Carryforward. Any unexpended balance of the TANF appropriation in the first year of the biennium does not cancel but is available for the second year.

(c) Comprehensive Suicide Prevention. $2,730,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,730,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for a comprehensive, community-based suicide prevention strategy. The funds are allocated as follows:

(1) $955,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $955,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for community-based suicide prevention grants authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 145.56, subdivision 2. Specific emphasis must be placed on those communities with the greatest disparities. The base for this appropriation is $1,291,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $1,291,000 in fiscal year 2023;

(2) $683,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $683,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to support evidence-based training for educators and school staff and purchase suicide prevention curriculum for student use statewide, as authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 145.56, subdivision 2. The base for this appropriation is $913,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $913,000 in fiscal year 2023;

(3) $137,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $137,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to implement the Zero Suicide framework with up to 20 behavioral and health care organizations each year to treat individuals at risk for suicide and support those individuals across systems of care upon discharge. The base for this appropriation is $205,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $205,000 in fiscal year 2023;

(4) $955,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $955,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to develop and fund a Minnesota-based network of National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, providing statewide coverage. The base for this appropriation is $1,321,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $1,321,000 in fiscal year 2023; and

(5) the commissioner may retain up to 18.23 percent of the appropriation under this paragraph to administer the comprehensive suicide prevention strategy.

(d) Statewide Tobacco Cessation. $1,598,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,748,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for statewide tobacco cessation services under Minnesota Statutes, section 144.397. The base for this appropriation is $2,878,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $2,878,000 in fiscal year 2023.

(e) Health Care Access Survey. $225,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $225,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the health care access fund to continue and improve the Minnesota Health Care Access Survey. These appropriations may be used in either year of the biennium.

(f) Community Solutions for Healthy Child Development Grant Program. $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for the community solutions for healthy child development grant program to promote health and racial equity for young children and their families under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.9285 article 11, section 107. The commissioner may use up to 23.5 percent of the total appropriation for administration. The base for this appropriation is $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2022, $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2023, and $0 in fiscal year 2024.

(g) Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Program. $375,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $375,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for the domestic violence and sexual assault prevention program under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.987 article 11, section 108. This is a onetime appropriation.

(h) Skin Lightening Products Public Awareness Grant Program. $100,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $100,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for a skin lightening products public awareness and education grant program. This is a onetime appropriation.

(i) Cannabinoid Products Workgroup. $8,000 in fiscal year 2020 is from the state government special revenue fund for the cannabinoid products workgroup. This is a onetime appropriation.

(j) Base Level Adjustments. The general fund base is $96,742,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $96,742,000 in fiscal year 2023. The health care access fund base is $37,432,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $36,832,000 in fiscal year 2023.

Sec. 7.

[CORR19-04C]

2019 First Special Session S.F. No. 12, article 14, section 11, if enacted, is amended to read:

Sec. 11.

COMMISSIONER OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET

$498,000$498,000

(a) Proven-Effective Practices Evaluation Activities. $498,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $498,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for evaluation activities under Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.055, subdivision 1a.

(b) Transfer; Premium Security Account. By August 30, 2020, the commissioner of commerce shall transfer $142,000,000 from the premium security account to the general fund. This is a onetime transfer.

(c) Transfer Cancellation. The commissioner of management and budget shall not make the $50,000,000 transfer authorized under Minnesota Statutes, section 62U.10, subdivision 8, in fiscal year 2019 resulting from the December 2017 report conducted under Minnesota Statutes, section 62U.10, subdivision 7.

(d) Savings Determination. (1) When preparing the forecast for state revenues and expenditures under Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.103, the commissioner of management and budget shall assume a reduction of health and human services spending of $100,000,000 for the biennium beginning July 1, 2022 2021, until the end of the legislative session that enacts a budget for the Department of Health and the Department of Human Services for that biennium.

(2) Upon enactment of a budget for the Department of Health and the Department of Human Services for the biennium beginning July 1, 2022 2021, the legislature shall identify enacted provisions that were recommended by or based on the recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Health and Human Services.

(3) To the extent the net savings attributable to the provisions in clause (2) for the biennium beginning July 1, 2022 2021, are less than $100,000,000, the commissioner shall reduce the balance of the general fund budget reserve established under Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.152, subdivision 1a, by an amount equal to the difference between the savings identified in clause (2) and the assumed $100,000,000 of savings in clause (1).

Sec. 8.

EFFECTIVE DATE.

Unless otherwise provided, each section of this act is effective at the time the provision being corrected is effective.

Presented to the governor May 28, 2019

Signed by the governor May 30, 2019, 3:38 p.m.