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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

CHAPTER 3501, GRADUATION STANDARDS

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Table of Parts
Part Title
3501.0010 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0020 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0030 Repealed by subpart
3501.0040 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0050 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0060 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0070 [Repealed, 23 SR 2358]
3501.0080 [Repealed, 23 SR 2358]
3501.0090 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0100 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0110 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0120 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0130 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0140 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0150 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0160 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0170 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0180 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0200 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0210 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0220 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0230 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0240 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0250 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0260 [Repealed, 23 SR 2358]
3501.0270 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0280 Repealed by subpart
3501.0290 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0300 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0310 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0320 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0330 Repealed by subpart
3501.0340 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0350 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0360 [Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]
3501.0370 Repealed by subpart
3501.0380 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0390 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0400 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0410 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0420 Repealed by subpart
3501.0430 [Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]
3501.0440 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0441 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0442 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0443 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0444 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0445 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0446 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0447 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0448 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0449 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0450 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0460 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0461 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0462 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0463 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0464 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0465 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0466 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0467 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0468 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
3501.0469 [Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR LANGUAGE ARTS
3501.0505 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0510 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0515 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0520 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0525 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0530 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0535 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0540 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0545 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0550 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.0560 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0565 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0570 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0575 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0580 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0585 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0590 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0595 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0600 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0605 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0610 [Repealed, 33 SR 507]
3501.0620 [Repealed, 34 SR 643]
3501.0625 [Repealed, 34 SR 643]
3501.0630 [Repealed, 34 SR 643]
3501.0635 [Repealed, 34 SR 643]
3501.0640 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 READING STANDARDS.
3501.0645 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 WRITING STANDARDS.
3501.0650 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 SPEAKING, VIEWING, LISTENING, AND MEDIA LITERACY STANDARDS.
3501.0655 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 LANGUAGE STANDARDS.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS
3501.0700 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.
3501.0705 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.
3501.0710 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.
3501.0715 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.
3501.0720 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.
3501.0725 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.
3501.0730 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.
3501.0735 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.
3501.0740 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.
3501.0745 GRADES 9 THROUGH 11 STANDARDS.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE ARTS
3501.0800 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 3 STANDARDS.
3501.0805 GRADES 4 AND 5 STANDARDS.
3501.0810 GRADES 6 THROUGH 8 STANDARDS.
3501.0815 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS IN SCIENCE
3501.0900 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.
3501.0905 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.
3501.0910 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.
3501.0915 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.
3501.0920 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.
3501.0925 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.
3501.0930 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.
3501.0935 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.
3501.0940 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.
3501.0945 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.
3501.0950 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 CHEMISTRY STANDARDS.
3501.0955 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 PHYSICS STANDARDS.
3501.1000 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1020 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1030 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1040 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1050 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1110 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1120 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1130 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1140 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1150 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1160 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1170 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1180 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
3501.1190 [Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
3501.1200 SCOPE AND PURPOSE.
3501.1210 ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES
3501.1300 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.
3501.1305 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.
3501.1310 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.
3501.1315 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.
3501.1320 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.
3501.1325 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.
3501.1330 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.
3501.1335 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.
3501.1340 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.
3501.1345 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.
ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION
3501.1400 SCOPE AND PURPOSE.
3501.1410 PHYSICAL EDUCATION STANDARDS.

3501.0010

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0020

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0030

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 2.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 6.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 7.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 8.

[Repealed, 23 SR 2358]

Subp. 9.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 10.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 11.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 12.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 13.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 14.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 15.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 16.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0040

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0050

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0060

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0070

[Repealed, 23 SR 2358]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0080

[Repealed, 23 SR 2358]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0090

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0100

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0110

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0120

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0130

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0140

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0150

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0160

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0170

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0180

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0200

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0210

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0220

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0230

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0240

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0250

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0260

[Repealed, 23 SR 2358]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0270

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0280

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 2.

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, L 2001 1Sp6 art 2 s 78]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0290

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0300

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0310

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0320

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0330

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 2.

A.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21]

B.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

C.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 6.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 7.

A.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

B.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0340

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0350

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0360

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0370

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Subp. 2.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 6.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0380

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0390

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0400

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0410

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0420

Subpart 1.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 2.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 3.

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Subp. 4.

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0430

[Repealed, L 2000 c 500 s 21; 25 SR 1402]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0440

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0441

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0442

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0443

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0444

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0445

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0446

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0447

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0448

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0449

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0450

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0460

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0461

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0462

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0463

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0464

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0465

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0466

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0467

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0468

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0469

[Repealed, L 2003 c 129 art 1 s 12]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR LANGUAGE ARTS

3501.0505

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0510

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0515

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0520

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0525

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0530

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0535

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0540

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0545

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0550

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0560

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0565

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0570

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0575

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0580

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0585

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0590

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0595

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0600

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0605

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0610

[Repealed, 33 SR 507]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0620

[Repealed, 34 SR 643]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0625

[Repealed, 34 SR 643]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0630

[Repealed, 34 SR 643]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0635

[Repealed, 34 SR 643]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0640 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 READING STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Key ideas and details.

A.

The student will read closely to determine what the text says explicitly, to make logical inferences from it, and to cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

B.

The student will determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development and summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

C.

The student will analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Subp. 2.

Craft and structure.

A.

The student will interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

B.

The student will analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

C.

The student will assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Subp. 3.

Integration of knowledge and ideas.

A.

The student will integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

B.

The student will delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

C.

The student will analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Subp. 4.

Range of reading and level of text complexity.

The student will read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

36 SR 589

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0645 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 WRITING STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Text types and purposes.

A.

The student will write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

B.

The student will write informative and explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

C.

The student will write narratives and other creative texts to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Subp. 2.

Writing process: production and distribution of writing.

A.

The student will produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

B.

The student will use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

C.

The student will use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

Subp. 3.

Research to build and present knowledge.

A.

The student will conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

B.

The student will gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

C.

The student will draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Subp. 4.

Range of writing.

The student will write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

36 SR 589

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0650 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 SPEAKING, VIEWING, LISTENING, AND MEDIA LITERACY STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Comprehension and collaboration.

A.

The student will prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

B.

The student will integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

C.

The student will evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Subp. 2.

Presentation of knowledge and ideas.

A.

The student will present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

B.

The student will make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

C.

The student will adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Subp. 3.

Media literacy.

A.

The student will critically analyze information found in electronic, print, and mass media and use a variety of these sources.

B.

The student will communicate using traditional or digital multimedia formats and digital writing and publishing for a specific purpose.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

36 SR 589

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0655 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 LANGUAGE STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Conventions of standard English.

A.

The student will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

B.

The student will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Subp. 2.

Knowledge of language.

The student will apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Subp. 3.

Vocabulary acquisition and use.

A.

The student will determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

B.

The student will demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

C.

The student will acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level and demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

36 SR 589

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS

3501.0700 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will understand the relationship between quantities and whole numbers up to 31.

B.

The student will use objects and pictures to represent situations involving combining and separating.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

The student will recognize, create, complete, and extend patterns.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will recognize and sort basic two- and three-dimensional shapes and use them to model real-world objects.

B.

The student will compare and order objects according to location and measurable attributes.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0705 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will count, compare, and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an emphasis on groups of tens and ones.

B.

The student will use a variety of models and strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems in real-world and mathematical contexts.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will recognize and create patterns and use rules to describe patterns.

B.

The student will use number sentences involving addition and subtraction basic facts to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems. The student will create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will describe characteristics of basic shapes. The student will use basic shapes to compose and decompose other objects in various contexts.

B.

The student will use basic concepts of measurement in real-world and mathematical situations involving length, time, and money.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0710 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will compare and represent whole numbers up to 1,000 with an emphasis on place value and equality.

B.

The student will demonstrate mastery of addition and subtraction basic facts. The student will add and subtract one- and two-digit numbers in real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will recognize, create, describe, and use patterns and rules to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will use number sentences involving addition, subtraction, and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems. The student will create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will identify, describe, and compare basic shapes according to their geometric attributes.

B.

The student will understand length as a measurable attribute. The student will use tools to measure length.

C.

The student will use time and money in real-world and mathematical situations.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0715 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will compare and represent whole numbers up to 100,000 with an emphasis on place value and equality.

B.

The student will add and subtract multidigit whole numbers. The student will represent multiplication and division in various ways. The student will solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic.

C.

The student will understand meanings and uses of fractions in real-world and mathematical situations.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will use single-operation input-output rules to represent patterns and relationships, and to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will use number sentences involving multiplication and division basic facts and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems. The student will create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will use geometric attributes to describe and create shapes in various contexts.

B.

The student will understand perimeter as a measurable attribute of real-world and mathematical objects. The student will use various tools to measure distances.

C.

The student will use time, money, and temperature to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis.

The student will collect, organize, display, and interpret data. The student will use labels and a variety of scales and units in displays.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0720 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will demonstrate mastery of multiplication and division basic facts. The student will multiply multidigit numbers and solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic.

B.

The student will represent and compare fractions and decimals in real-world and mathematical situations. The student will use place value to understand how decimals represent quantities.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will use input-output rules, tables, and charts to represent patterns and relationships and to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will use number sentences involving multiplication, division, and unknowns to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems. The student will create real-world situations corresponding to number sentences.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will name, describe, classify, and sketch polygons.

B.

The student will understand angle and area as measurable attributes of real-world and mathematical objects. The student will use various tools to measure angles and areas.

C.

The student will use translations, reflections, and rotations to establish congruency and understand symmetries.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis.

The student will collect, organize, display, and interpret data, including data collected over a period of time and data represented by fractions and decimals.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0725 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will divide multidigit numbers. The student will solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic.

B.

The student will read, write, represent, and compare fractions and decimals. The student will recognize and write equivalent fractions, and convert between fractions and decimals. The student will use fractions and decimals in real-world and mathematical situations.

C.

The student will add and subtract fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will recognize and represent patterns of change. The student will use patterns, tables, graphs, and rules to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will use properties of arithmetic to generate equivalent numerical expressions and evaluate expressions involving whole numbers.

C.

The student will understand and interpret equations and inequalities involving variables and whole numbers, and use them to represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will describe, classify, and draw representations of three-dimensional figures.

B.

The student will determine the area of triangles and quadrilaterals. The student will determine the surface area and volume of rectangular prisms in various contexts.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis.

The student will display and interpret data. The student will determine mean, median, and range.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0730 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will read, write, represent, and compare positive rational numbers expressed as fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios. The student will write positive integers as products of factors. The student will use these representations in real-world and mathematical situations.

B.

The student will understand the concept of ratio and its relationship to fractions and to the multiplication and division of whole numbers. The student will use ratios to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

C.

The student will multiply and divide decimals, fractions, and mixed numbers. The student will solve real-world and mathematical problems using arithmetic with positive rational numbers.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will recognize and represent relationships between varying quantities. The student will translate from one representation to another. The student will use patterns, tables, graphs, and rules to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will use properties of arithmetic to generate equivalent numerical expressions and evaluate expressions involving positive rational numbers.

C.

The student will understand and interpret equations and inequalities involving variables and positive rational numbers. The student will use equations and inequalities to represent real-world and mathematical problems. The student will use the idea of maintaining equality to solve equations. The student will interpret solutions in the original context.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will calculate perimeter, area, surface area, and volume of two- and three-dimensional figures to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

B.

The student will understand and use relationships between angles in geometric figures.

C.

The student will choose appropriate units of measurement and use ratios to convert within measurement systems to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis and probability.

The student will use probabilities to solve real-world and mathematical problems. The student will represent probabilities using fractions, decimals, and percents.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0735 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

A.

The student will apply, read, write, represent, and compare positive and negative rational numbers, expressed as integers, fractions, and decimals.

B.

The student will calculate with positive and negative rational numbers, and rational numbers with whole number exponents, to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will understand the concept of proportionality in real-world and mathematical situations, and distinguish between proportional and other relationships.

B.

The student will recognize proportional relationships in real-world and mathematical situations. The student will represent these and other relationships with tables, verbal descriptions, symbols, and graphs. The student will solve problems involving proportional relationships and explain results in the original context.

C.

The student will apply understanding of order of operations and algebraic properties to generate equivalent numerical and algebraic expressions containing positive and negative rational numbers and grouping symbols. The student will evaluate such expressions.

D.

The student will represent real-world and mathematical situations using equations with variables. The student will solve equations symbolically, using the properties of equality. The student will also solve equations graphically and numerically. The student will interpret solutions in the original context.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will use reasoning with proportions and ratios to determine measurements, justify formulas, and solve real-world and mathematical problems involving circles and related geometric figures.

B.

The student will analyze the effect of change of scale, translations, and reflections on the attributes of two-dimensional figures.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis and probability.

A.

The student will use mean, median, and range to draw conclusions about data and make predictions.

B.

The student will display and interpret data in a variety of ways, including circle graphs and histograms.

C.

The student will calculate probabilities and reason about probabilities using proportions to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0740 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Number and operation.

The student will read, write, compare, classify, and represent real numbers, and use them to solve problems in various contexts.

Subp. 2.

Algebra.

A.

The student will understand the concept of function in real-world and mathematical situations, and distinguish between linear and nonlinear functions.

B.

The student will recognize linear functions in real-world and mathematical situations. The student will represent linear functions and other functions with tables, verbal descriptions, symbols, and graphs. The student will solve problems involving these functions and explain results in the original context.

C.

The student will generate equivalent numerical and algebraic expressions and use algebraic properties to evaluate expressions.

D.

The student will represent real-world and mathematical situations using equations and inequalities involving linear expressions. The student will solve equations and inequalities symbolically and graphically. The student will interpret solutions in the original context.

Subp. 3.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will solve problems involving right triangles using the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse.

B.

The student will solve problems involving parallel and perpendicular lines on a coordinate system.

Subp. 4.

Data analysis and probability.

The student will interpret data using scatterplots and approximate lines of best fit. The student will use lines of best fit to draw conclusions about data.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0745 GRADES 9 THROUGH 11 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Algebra.

A.

The student will understand the concept of function, and identify important features of functions and other relations using symbolic and graphical methods where appropriate.

B.

The student will recognize linear, quadratic, exponential, and other common functions in real-world and mathematical situations. The student will represent these functions with tables, verbal descriptions, symbols, and graphs. The student will solve problems involving these functions, and explain results in the original context.

C.

The student will generate equivalent algebraic expressions involving polynomials and radicals. The student will use algebraic properties to evaluate expressions.

D.

The student will represent real-world and mathematical situations using equations and inequalities involving linear, quadratic, exponential, and nth root functions. The student will solve equations and inequalities symbolically and graphically. The student will interpret solutions in the original context.

Subp. 2.

Geometry and measurement.

A.

The student will calculate measurements of plane and solid geometric figures. The student will know that physical measurements depend on the choice of a unit and that they are approximations.

B.

The student will construct logical arguments based on axioms, definitions, and theorems in order to prove theorems and other results in geometry.

C.

The student will know and apply properties of geometric figures to solve real-world and mathematical problems and to logically justify results in geometry.

D.

The student will solve real-world and mathematical geometric problems using algebraic methods.

Subp. 3.

Data analysis and probability.

A.

The student will display and analyze data. The student will use various measures associated with data to draw conclusions, identify trends, and describe relationships.

B.

The student will explain the uses of data and statistical thinking to draw inferences, make predictions, and justify conclusions.

C.

The student will calculate probabilities and apply probability concepts to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.023

History:

33 SR 507

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE ARTS

3501.0800 KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 3 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Artistic foundations.

A.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of the arts area.

B.

The student will demonstrate knowledge and use of the technical skills of the art form, integrating technology when applicable.

C.

The student will demonstrate understanding of the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts that influence the arts areas.

Subp. 2.

Artistic process: create or make.

The student will create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 3.

Artistic process: perform or present.

The student will perform or present in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 4.

Artistic process: respond or critique.

The student will respond to or critique a variety of creations or performances using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 5.

Arts areas.

The student will receive arts education that complies with these academic standards in at least two of the three arts areas required to be offered by a public elementary or middle school from the following: dance, music, theater, and visual arts. The student may receive arts education in media arts in addition to the two required arts areas.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.023

History:

34 SR 643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0805 GRADES 4 AND 5 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Artistic foundations.

A.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of the arts area.

B.

The student will demonstrate knowledge and use of the technical skills of the art form, integrating technology when applicable.

C.

The student will demonstrate understanding of the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts that influence the arts areas.

Subp. 2.

Artistic process: create or make.

The student will create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 3.

Artistic process: perform or present.

The student will perform or present in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 4.

Artistic process: respond or critique.

The student will respond to or critique a variety of creations or performances using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 5.

Arts areas.

The student will receive arts education that complies with these academic standards in at least two of the three arts areas required to be offered by a public elementary or middle school from the following: dance, music, theater, and visual arts. The student may receive arts education in media arts in addition to the two required arts areas.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.023

History:

34 SR 643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0810 GRADES 6 THROUGH 8 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Artistic foundations.

A.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of the arts area.

B.

The student will demonstrate knowledge and use of the technical skills of the art form, integrating technology when applicable.

C.

The student will demonstrate understanding of the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts that influence the arts areas.

Subp. 2.

Artistic process: create or make.

The student will create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 3.

Artistic process: perform or present.

The student will perform or present in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 4.

Artistic process: respond or critique.

The student will respond to or critique a variety of creations or performances using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 5.

Arts areas.

The student will receive arts education that complies with these academic standards in at least two of the three arts areas required to be offered by a public elementary or middle school from the following: dance, music, theater, and visual arts. The student may receive arts education in media arts in addition to the two required arts areas.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.023

History:

34 SR 643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0815 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Artistic foundations.

A.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of the arts area.

B.

The student will demonstrate knowledge and use of the technical skills of the art form, integrating technology when applicable.

C.

The student will demonstrate understanding of the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts that influence the arts areas.

Subp. 2.

Artistic process: create or make.

The student will create or make in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 3.

Artistic process: perform or present.

The student will perform or present in a variety of contexts in the arts area using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 4.

Artistic process: respond or critique.

The student will respond to or critique a variety of creations or performances using the artistic foundations.

Subp. 5.

Arts areas.

The student will receive arts education that complies with these academic standards in at least one of the three arts areas required to be offered by a public high school from the following: media arts, dance, music, theater, and visual arts.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.023

History:

34 SR 643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS IN SCIENCE

3501.0900 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry is a set of interrelated processes used to pose questions about the natural world and investigate phenomena.

B.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that some objects occur in nature. The student will understand that others have been designed and processed by people.

Subp. 2.

Physical science; matter.

The student will understand that objects can be described in terms of the materials they are made of and their physical properties.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science; interdependence within the earth system.

The student will understand that weather can be described in measurable quantities and changes from day to day and with the seasons.

Subp. 4.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that living things are diverse with many different observable characteristics.

B.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that natural systems have many components that interact to maintain the living system.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0905 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientists work as individuals and in groups to investigate the natural world, emphasizing evidence and communicating with others.

B.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that designed and natural systems exist in the world. The student will understand that these systems are made up of components that act within a system and interact with other systems.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry.

Subp. 2.

Earth and space science; earth structure and processes.

The student will understand that earth materials include solid rocks, sand, soil, and water. The student will understand that these materials have different observable physical properties that make them useful.

Subp. 3.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that living things are diverse with many different observable characteristics.

B.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that natural systems have many components that interact to maintain the system.

C.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes during their life cycles.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0910 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry is a set of interrelated processes incorporating multiple approaches that are used to pose questions about the natural world and investigate phenomena.

B.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineering design is the process of identifying a problem and devising a product or process to solve the problem.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that objects can be described in terms of the materials they are made of and their physical properties.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that the physical properties of materials can be changed, but not all materials respond the same way to what is done to them.

C.

Motion. The student will understand that the motion of an object can be described by a change in its position over time.

D.

Motion. The student will understand that the motion of an object can be changed by push or pull forces.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science; interdependence within the earth system.

The student will understand that weather can be described in measurable quantities and changes from day to day and with the seasons.

Subp. 4.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that living things are diverse with many different observable characteristics.

B.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that natural systems have many components that interact to maintain the system.

C.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes during their life cycles.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0915 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientists work as individuals and in groups, emphasizing evidence, open communication, and skepticism.

B.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry is a set of interrelated processes incorporating multiple approaches that are used to pose questions about the natural world and investigate phenomena.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry.

D.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that tools and mathematics help scientists and engineers see more, measure more accurately, and do things that they could not otherwise accomplish.

Subp. 2.

Physical science; energy.

The student will understand that energy appears in different forms, including sound and light.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science.

A.

The universe. The student will understand that the sun and moon have locations and movements that can be observed and described.

B.

The universe. The student will understand that objects in the solar system as seen from Earth have various sizes and distinctive patterns of motion.

Subp. 4.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that living things are diverse with many different characteristics that enable them to grow, reproduce, and survive.

B.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that offspring are generally similar to their parents, but may have variations that can be advantageous or disadvantageous in a particular environment.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0920 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineers design, create, and develop structures, processes, and systems that are intended to improve society and may make humans more productive.

B.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineering design is the process of identifying problems, developing multiple solutions, selecting the best possible solution, and building the product.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that the needs of any society influence the technologies that are developed and how they are used.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that objects have observable properties that can be measured.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that solids, liquids, and gases are states of matter that have unique properties.

C.

Energy. The student will understand that energy appears in different forms, including heat and electromagnetism.

D.

Energy. The student will understand that energy can be transformed within a system or transferred to other systems or the environment.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science.

A.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that rocks are Earth materials that may vary in composition.

B.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that water circulates through the Earth's crust, oceans, and atmosphere in what is known as the water cycle.

C.

Human interactions with Earth systems. The student will understand that in order to improve their existence, humans interact with and influence Earth systems.

Subp. 4.

Life science; human interactions with living systems.

The student will understand that microorganisms can get inside one's body and they may keep it from working properly.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0925 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that science is a way of knowing about the natural world, is done by individuals and in groups, and is characterized by empirical criteria, logical argument, and skeptical review.

B.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry requires identification of assumptions, use of critical and logical thinking, and consideration of alternative explanations.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry.

D.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that tools and mathematics help scientists and engineers see more, measure more accurately, and do things that they could not otherwise accomplish.

Subp. 2.

Physical science; motion.

The student will understand that an object's motion is affected by forces and can be described by the object's speed and the direction it is moving.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science.

A.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that the surface of the Earth changes. The student will understand that some changes are due to slow processes and some changes are due to rapid processes.

B.

Human interactions with Earth systems. The student will understand that in order to maintain and improve their existence, humans interact with and influence Earth systems.

Subp. 4.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that living things are diverse with many different characteristics that enable them to grow, reproduce, and survive.

B.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that natural systems have many components that interact to maintain the living system.

C.

Human interactions with living systems. The student will understand that humans change environments in ways that can be either beneficial or harmful to themselves and other organisms.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0930 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineers create, develop, and manufacture machines, structures, processes, and systems that impact society and may make humans more productive.

B.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineering design is the process of devising products, processes, and systems that address a need, capitalize on an opportunity, or solve a specific problem.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that designed and natural systems exist in the world. The student will understand that these systems consist of components that act within the system and interact with other systems.

D.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that current and emerging technologies have enabled humans to develop and use models to understand and communicate how natural and designed systems work and interact.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that pure substances can be identified by properties which are independent of the sample of the substance and the properties can be explained by a model of matter that is composed of small particles.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that substances can undergo physical changes which do not change the composition or the total mass of the substance in a closed system.

C.

Motion. The student will understand that the motion of an object can be described in terms of speed, direction, and change of position.

D.

Motion. The student will understand that forces have magnitude and direction and affect the motion of objects.

E.

Energy. The student will understand that waves involve the transfer of energy without the transfer of matter.

F.

Energy. The student will understand that energy can be transformed within a system or transferred to other systems or the environment.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0935 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that science is a way of knowing about the natural world and is characterized by empirical criteria, logical argument, and skeptical review.

B.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry uses multiple interrelated processes to investigate questions and propose explanations about the natural world.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that current and emerging technologies have enabled humans to develop and use models to understand and communicate how natural and designed systems work and interact.

Subp. 2.

Physical science; matter.

The student will understand that the idea that matter is made up of atoms and molecules provides the basis for understanding the properties of matter.

Subp. 3.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that tissues, organs, and organ systems are composed of cells and function to serve the needs of all cells for food, air, and waste removal.

B.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that all organisms are composed of one or more cells which carry on the many functions needed to sustain life.

C.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that natural systems include a variety of organisms that interact with one another in several ways.

D.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that the flow of energy and the recycling of matter are essential to a stable ecosystem.

E.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that reproduction is a characteristic of all organisms and is essential for the continuation of a species. The student will understand that hereditary information is contained in genes which are inherited through asexual or sexual reproduction.

F.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that individual organisms with certain traits in particular environments are more likely than others to survive and have offspring.

G.

Human interactions with living systems. The student will understand that human activity can change living organisms and ecosystems.

H.

Human interactions with living systems. The student will understand that human beings are constantly interacting with other organisms that cause disease.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0940 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that science is a way of knowing about the natural world and is characterized by empirical criteria, logical argument, and skeptical review.

B.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry uses multiple interrelated processes to investigate questions and propose explanations about the natural world.

C.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry.

D.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that science and engineering operate in the context of society and both influence and are influenced by this context.

E.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that current and emerging technologies have enabled humans to develop and use models to understand and communicate how natural and designed systems work and interact.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that pure substances can be identified by properties which are independent of the sample of the substance and the properties can be explained by a model of matter that is composed of small particles.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that substances can undergo physical changes and chemical changes which may change the properties of the substance but do not change the total mass in a closed system.

C.

Energy. The student will understand that waves involve the transfer of energy without the transfer of matter.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science.

A.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that the movement of tectonic plates results from interactions among the lithosphere, mantle, and core.

B.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that landforms are the result of the combination of constructive and destructive processes.

C.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that rocks and rock formations indicate evidence of the materials and conditions that produced them.

D.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that the sun is the principal external energy source for the Earth.

E.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that patterns of atmospheric movement influence global climate and local weather.

F.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that water, which covers the majority of the Earth's surface, circulates through the crust, oceans, and atmosphere in what is known as the water cycle.

G.

The universe. The student will understand that the Earth is the third planet from the sun in a system that includes the moon, the sun, seven other planets and their moons, and smaller objects.

H.

Human interactions with Earth systems. The student will understand that in order to maintain and improve their existence, humans interact with and influence Earth systems.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.0945 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

The practice of science. The student will understand that science is a way of knowing about the natural world and is characterized by empirical criteria, logical argument, and skeptical review.

B.

The practice of science. The student will understand that scientific inquiry uses multiple interrelated processes to investigate and explain the natural world.

C.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineering is a way of addressing human needs by applying science concepts and mathematical techniques to develop new products, tools, processes, and systems.

D.

The practice of engineering. The student will understand that engineering design is an analytical and creative process of devising a solution to meet a need or solve a specific problem.

E.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that natural and designed systems are made up of components that act within a system and interact with other systems.

F.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry.

G.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that science and engineering operate in the context of society and both influence and are influenced by this context.

H.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics rely on each other to enhance knowledge and understanding.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that the structure of the atom determines chemical properties of elements.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that chemical reactions involve the rearrangement of atoms as chemical bonds are broken and formed through transferring or sharing of electrons and the absorption or release of energy.

C.

Motion. The student will understand that an object's mass and the forces on it affect the motion of an object.

D.

Energy. The student will understand that energy can be transformed within a system or transferred to other systems or the environment, but is always conserved.

E.

Human interactions with physical systems. The student will understand that there are benefits, costs, and risks to different means of generating and using energy.

Subp. 3.

Earth and space science.

A.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that the relationships among earthquakes, mountains, volcanoes, fossil deposits, rock layers, and ocean features provide evidence for the theory of plate tectonics.

B.

Earth structure and processes. The student will understand that by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations, geologic events can be inferred and geologic time can be estimated.

C.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that the Earth system has internal and external sources of energy, which produce heat and drive the motion of material in the oceans, atmosphere, and solid earth.

D.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that global climate is determined by distribution of energy from the sun at the Earth's surface.

E.

Interdependence within the Earth system. The student will understand that the cycling of materials through different reservoirs of the Earth's system is powered by the Earth's sources of energy.

F.

The universe. The student will understand that the solar system, sun, and Earth formed over billions of years.

G.

The universe. The student will understand that the Big Bang theory states that the universe expanded from a hot, dense, chaotic mass, after which chemical elements formed and clumped together to eventually form stars and galaxies.

H.

Human interactions with Earth systems. The student will understand that people consider potential benefits, costs, and risks to make decisions on how they interact with natural systems.

Subp. 4.

Life science.

A.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that organisms use the interaction of cellular processes as well as tissues and organ systems to maintain homeostasis.

B.

Structure and function in living systems. The student will understand that cells and cell structures have specific functions that allow an organism to grow, survive, and reproduce.

C.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that the interrelationship and interdependence of organisms generate dynamic biological communities in ecosystems.

D.

Interdependence among living systems. The student will understand that matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization of living systems and the physical environment, as chemical elements are combined in different ways.

E.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that genetic information found in the cell provides information for assembling proteins, which dictate the expression of traits in an individual.

F.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that variation within a species is the natural result of new inheritable characteristics occurring from new combinations of existing genes or from mutations of genes in reproductive cells.

G.

Evolution in living systems. The student will understand that evolution by natural selection is a scientific explanation for the history and diversity of life on Earth.

H.

Human interactions with living systems. The student will understand that human activity has consequences on living organisms and ecosystems.

I.

Human interactions with living systems. The student will understand that personal and community health can be affected by the environment, body functions, and human behavior.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018

3501.0950 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 CHEMISTRY STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that developments in chemistry affect society and societal concerns affect the field of chemistry.

B.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that physical and mathematical models are used to describe physical systems.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Matter. The student will understand that the periodic table illustrates how patterns in the physical and chemical properties of elements are related to atomic structure.

B.

Matter. The student will understand that chemical and physical properties of matter result from the ability of atoms to form bonds.

C.

Matter. The student will understand that chemical reactions describe a chemical change in which one or more reactants are transformed into one or more products.

D.

Matter. The student will understand that states of matter can be described in terms of motion of molecules and that the properties and behavior of gases can be explained using the kinetic molecular theory.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018

3501.0955 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 PHYSICS STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

The nature of science and engineering.

A.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that developments in physics affect society and societal concerns affect the field of physics.

B.

Interactions among science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and society. The student will understand that physical and mathematical models are used to describe physical systems.

Subp. 2.

Physical science.

A.

Motion. The student will understand that forces and inertia determine the motion of objects.

B.

Motion. The student will understand that when objects change their motion or interact with other objects in the absence of frictional forces, the total amount of mechanical energy remains constant.

C.

Energy. The student will understand that sound waves are generated from mechanical oscillations of objects and travel through a medium.

D.

Energy. The student will understand that electrons respond to electric fields and voltages by moving through electrical circuits and this motion generates magnetic fields.

E.

Energy. The student will understand that magnetic and electric fields interact to produce electromagnetic waves.

F.

Energy. The student will understand that heat energy is transferred between objects or regions that are at different temperatures by the processes of convection, conduction, and radiation.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

34 SR 1609

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018

3501.1000

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1020

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1030

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1040

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1050

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1110

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1120

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1130

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1140

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1150

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1160

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1170

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1180

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1190

[Repealed, L 2013 c 116 art 2 s 22]

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

3501.1200 SCOPE AND PURPOSE.

The purpose of these standards is to establish statewide standards for English language development that govern the instruction of students identified as English learners under Minnesota Statutes, sections 124D.58 to 124D.65. The state of Minnesota's standards for English language development are the current standards developed by the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) consortium.

Statutory Authority:

L 2011 1Sp11 art 2 s 46

History:

36 SR 739; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1210 ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Application.

English learners will meet the language development standards in subparts 2 through 6.

Subp. 2.

Social and instructional language.

English learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.

Subp. 3.

The language of language arts.

English learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts.

Subp. 4.

The language of mathematics.

English learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of mathematics.

Subp. 5.

The language of science.

English learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of science.

Subp. 6.

The language of social studies.

English learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies.

Statutory Authority:

L 2011 1Sp11 art 2 s 46

History:

36 SR 739; L 2012 c 239 art 1 s 33

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR SOCIAL STUDIES

3501.1300 KINDERGARTEN STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places, and events; and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts.

C.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

B.

Places and regions. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation; and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historians generally construct chronological narratives to characterize eras and explain past events and change over time. Historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that the differences and similarities of cultures around the world are attributable to their diverse origins and histories and interactions with other cultures throughout time.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1305 GRADE 1 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places, and events; and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts.

C.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local, and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that because of scarcity, individuals, organizations, and governments must evaluate trade-offs, make choices, and incur opportunity costs.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

B.

Places and regions. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation; and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historians generally construct chronological narratives to characterize eras and explain past events and change over time. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that the differences and similarities of cultures around the world are attributable to their diverse origins and histories and interactions with other cultures throughout time.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1310 GRADE 2 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places, and events, and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that because of scarcity, individuals, organizations, and governments must evaluate trade-offs, make choices, and incur opportunity costs. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

B.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the environment influences human actions; and humans both adapt to, and change, the environment.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historians generally construct chronological narratives to characterize eras and explain past events and change over time. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that the differences and similarities of cultures around the world are attributable to their diverse origins and histories and interactions with other cultures throughout time.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1315 GRADE 3 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the United States is based on democratic values and principles that include liberty, individual rights, justice, equality, the rule of law, limited government, common good, popular sovereignty, majority rule, and minority rights.

C.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local; and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Personal finance. The student will understand that personal and financial goals can be achieved by applying economic concepts and principles to personal financial planning, budgeting, spending, saving, investing, borrowing, and insuring decisions.

C.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

B.

Human systems. The student will understand that geographic factors influence the distribution, functions, growth, and patterns of cities and human settlements. The student will understand that processes of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of the Earth's surface.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historians generally construct chronological narratives to characterize eras and explain past events and change over time. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past. The student will understand that historical events have multiple causes and can lead to varied and unintended outcomes.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that history is made by individuals acting alone and collectively to address problems in communities, states, nations, and the world.

C.

World history. The student will understand that:

(1)

the emergence of domestication and agriculture facilitated the development of complex societies and caused far-reaching social and cultural effects between 8000 and 2000 BCE;

(2)

the development of interregional systems of communication and trade facilitated new forms of social organization and new belief systems between 2000 BCE and 600 CE; and

(3)

hemispheric networks intensified as a result of innovations in agriculture, trade across longer distances, the consolidation of belief systems, and the development of new multiethnic empires while diseases and climate change caused sharp, periodic fluctuations in global population between 600 and 1450.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1320 GRADE 4 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local; and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that because of scarcity, individuals, organizations, and governments must evaluate trade-offs, make choices, and incur opportunity costs. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context. The student will understand that geographic inquiry is a process in which people ask geographic questions and gather, organize, and analyze information to solve problems and plan for the future.

B.

Places and regions. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation, and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems. The student will understand that people construct regions to identify, organize, and interpret areas of the Earth's surface, which simplifies the Earth's complexity.

C.

Human systems. The student will understand that the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on the Earth's surface influence human systems, such as cultural, economic, and political systems. The student will understand that geographic factors influence the distribution, functions, growth, and patterns of cities and human settlements.

D.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the environment influences human actions; and humans both adapt to and change the environment. The student will understand that the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources change over time.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that the differences and similarities of cultures around the world are attributable to their diverse origins and histories and interactions with other cultures throughout time.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1325 GRADE 5 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the civic identity of the United States is shaped by historical figures, places, and events, and by key foundational documents and other symbolically important artifacts.

C.

Rights and responsibilities. The student will understand that individuals in a republic have rights, duties, and responsibilities.

D.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local; and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Personal finance. The student will understand that personal and financial goals can be achieved by applying economic concepts and principles to personal financial planning, budgeting, spending, saving, investing, borrowing, and insuring decisions.

C.

Microeconomic concepts. The student will understand that profit provides an incentive for individuals and businesses; different business organizations and market structures have an effect on the profit, price, and production of goods and services.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation, and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems.

B.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources change over time.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historians generally construct chronological narratives to characterize eras and explain past events and change over time. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past. The student will understand that historical events have multiple causes and can lead to varied and unintended outcomes.

B.

United States history. The student will understand that:

(1)

before European contact, North America was populated by indigenous nations that had developed a wide range of social structures, political systems, and economic activities, and whose expansive trade networks extended across the continent;

(2)

rivalries among European nations and their search for new opportunities fueled expanding global trade networks and, in North America, colonization and settlement and the exploitation of indigenous peoples and lands; colonial development evoked varied responses by indigenous nations, and produced regional societies and economies that included imported slave labor and distinct forms of local government between 1585 and 1763; and

(3)

the divergence of colonial interests from those of England led to an independence movement that resulted in the American Revolution and the foundation of a new nation based on the ideals of self-government and liberty between 1754 and 1800.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1330 GRADE 6 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Rights and responsibilities. The student will understand that individuals in a republic have rights, duties, and responsibilities. The student will understand that citizenship and its rights and duties are established by law.

C.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local, and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. The student will understand that the United States establishes and maintains relationships and interacts with indigenous nations and other sovereign nations, and plays a key role in world affairs.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Personal finance. The student will understand that personal and financial goals can be achieved by applying economic concepts and principles to personal financial planning, budgeting, spending, saving, investing, borrowing, and insuring decisions.

C.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource.

D.

Microeconomic concepts. The student will understand that market failures occur when markets fail to allocate resources efficiently or meet other goals, and this often leads to government attempts to correct the problem.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

B.

Human systems. The student will understand that geographic factors influence the distribution, functions, growth, and patterns of cities and other human settlements.

C.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources changes over time.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about what happened in the past, and how and why it happened.

B.

United States history. The student will understand that:

(1)

before European contact, North America was populated by indigenous nations that had developed a wide range of social structures, political systems, and economic activities, and whose expansive trade networks extended across the continent;

(2)

rivalries among European nations and their search for new opportunities fueled expanding global trade networks and, in North America, colonization and settlement and the exploitation of indigenous peoples and lands; colonial development evoked varied responses by indigenous nations, and produced regional societies and economies that included imported slave labor and distinct forms of local government between 1585 and 1763;

(3)

economic expansion and the conquest of indigenous and Mexican territory spurred the agricultural and industrial growth of the United States; led to increasing regional, economic, and ethnic divisions; and inspired multiple reform movements between 1792 and 1861;

(4)

regional tensions around economic development, slavery, territorial expansion, and governance resulted in a Civil War and a period of Reconstruction that led to the abolition of slavery, a more powerful federal government, a renewed push into indigenous nations' territory, and continuing conflict over racial relations between 1850 and 1877;

(5)

as the United States shifted from its agrarian roots into an industrial and global power, the rise of big business, urbanization, and immigration led to institutionalized racism, ethnic and class conflict, and new efforts at reform between 1870 and 1920;

(6)

the economic growth, cultural innovation, and political apathy of the 1920s ended in the Great Depression which spurred new forms of government intervention and renewed labor activism, followed by World War II and an economic resurgence between 1920 and 1945;

(7)

post-World War II United States was shaped by an economic boom, Cold War military engagements, politics and protests, and rights movements to improve the status of racial minorities, women, and America's indigenous peoples between 1945 and 1989; and

(8)

the end of the Cold War, shifting geopolitical dynamics, the intensification of the global economy, and rapidly changing technologies have given renewed urgency to debates about the United States' identity, values, and role in the world between 1980 and the present.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1335 GRADE 7 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the United States is based on democratic values and principles that include liberty, individual rights, justice, equality, the rule of law, limited government, common good, popular sovereignty, majority rule, and minority rights.

C.

Rights and responsibilities. The student will understand that individuals in a republic have rights, duties, and responsibilities. The student will understand that citizenship and its rights and duties are established by law.

D.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local; and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order. The student will understand that free and fair elections are key elements of the United States political system.

E.

Relationships of the United States to other nations and organizations. The student will understand that the United States establishes and maintains relationships and interacts with indigenous nations and other sovereign nations, and plays a key role in world affairs.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that because of scarcity, individuals, organizations, and governments must evaluate trade-offs, make choices, and incur opportunity costs.

C.

Microeconomics. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource. The student will understand that profit provides an incentive for individuals and businesses; different business organizations and market structures have an effect on the profit, price, and production of goods and services.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

Peoples, cultures, and change over time. The student will understand that the differences and similarities of cultures around the world are attributable to their diverse origins and histories, and interactions with other cultures throughout time.

C.

United States history. The student will understand that:

(1)

economic expansion and the conquest of indigenous and Mexican territory spurred the agricultural and industrial growth of the United States; led to increasing regional, economic, and ethnic divisions; and inspired multiple reform movements between 1792 and 1861;

(2)

regional tensions around economic development, slavery, territorial expansion, and governance resulted in a Civil War and a period of Reconstruction that led to the abolition of slavery, a more powerful federal government, a renewed push into indigenous nations' territory, and continuing conflict over racial relations between 1850 and 1877;

(3)

as the United States shifted from its agrarian roots into an industrial and global power, the rise of big business, urbanization, and immigration led to institutionalized racism, ethnic and class conflict, and new efforts at reform between 1870 and 1920;

(4)

the economic growth, cultural innovation, and political apathy of the 1920s ended in the Great Depression which spurred new forms of government intervention and renewed labor activism, followed by World War II and an economic resurgence between 1920 and 1945;

(5)

post-World War II United States was shaped by an economic boom, Cold War military engagements, politics and protests, and rights movements to improve the status of racial minorities, women, and America's indigenous peoples between 1945 and 1989; and

(6)

the end of the Cold War, shifting geopolitical dynamics, the intensification of the global economy, and rapidly changing technologies have given renewed urgency to debates about the United States' identity, values, and role in the world between 1980 and the present.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1340 GRADE 8 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy. The student will understand that international political and economic institutions influence world affairs and United States foreign policy. The student will understand that governments are based on different political philosophies and are established to serve various purposes.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that economic systems differ in the ways that they address the three basic economic issues of allocation, production, and distribution to meet society's broad economic goals.

C.

Macroeconomics. The student will understand that international trade, exchange rates, and international institutions affect individuals, organizations, and governments throughout the world.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context. The student will understand that geographic inquiry is a process in which people ask geographic questions and gather, organize, and analyze information to solve problems and plan for the future.

B.

Places and regions. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation, and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems.

C.

Human systems. The student will understand that the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on the Earth's surface influence human systems, such as cultural, economic, and political systems. The student will understand that geographic factors influence the distribution, functions, growth, and patterns of cities and human settlements. The student will understand that the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of the Earth's cultures influence human systems, such as social, economic, and political systems. The student will understand that processes of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of the Earth's surface.

D.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources changes over time.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

World history. The student will understand that post-World War II political reorganization produced the Cold War balance of power and new alliances that were based on competing economic and political doctrines between 1950 and 1989. The student will understand that globalization, the spread of capitalism, and the end of the Cold War have shaped a contemporary world still characterized by rapid technological change, dramatic increases in global population, and economic growth coupled with persistent economic and social disparities and cultural conflict between 1989 and the present.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

October 3, 2013

3501.1345 GRADES 9 THROUGH 12 STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Citizenship and government.

A.

Civic skills. The student will understand that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy.

B.

Civic values and principles of democracy. The student will understand that the United States is based on democratic values and principles that include liberty, individual rights, justice, equality, the rule of law, limited government, common good, popular sovereignty, majority rule, and minority rights.

C.

Rights and responsibilities. The student will understand that individuals in a republic have rights, duties, and responsibilities. The student will understand that citizenship and its rights and duties are established by law.

D.

Governmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that the United States government has specific functions that are determined by the way that power is delegated and controlled among various bodies: the three levels, federal, state, and local; and the three branches of government, legislative, executive, and judicial. The student will understand that the primary purposes of rules and laws within the United States constitutional government are to protect individual rights, promote the general welfare, and provide order. The student will understand that public policy is shaped by governmental and nongovernmental institutions and political processes. The student will understand that free and fair elections are key elements of the United States political system.

E.

Relationships of the United States to other nations and organizations. The student will understand that the United States establishes and maintains relationships and interacts with indigenous nations and other sovereign nations, and plays a key role in world affairs. The student will understand that international political and economic institutions influence world affairs and United States foreign policy. The student will understand that governments are based on different political philosophies and purposes; governments establish and maintain relationships with varied types of other governments.

Subp. 2.

Economics.

A.

Economic reasoning skills. The student will understand that people make informed economic choices by identifying their goals, interpreting and applying data, considering the short-run and long-run costs and benefits of alternative choices, and revising their goals based on their analysis.

B.

Personal finance. The student will understand that personal and financial goals can be achieved by applying economic concepts and principles to personal financial planning, budgeting, spending, saving, investing, borrowing, and insuring decisions.

C.

Fundamental concepts. The student will understand that because of scarcity, individuals, organizations, and governments must evaluate trade-offs, make choices, and incur opportunity costs. The student will understand that economic systems differ in the ways that they address the three basic economic issues of allocation, production, and distribution to meet society's broad economic goals.

D.

Microeconomic concepts. The student will understand that individuals, businesses, and governments interact and exchange goods, services, and resources in different ways and for different reasons; interactions between buyers and sellers in a market determines the price and quantity exchanged of a good, service, or resource. The student will understand that profit provides an incentive for individuals and businesses; different business organizations and market structures have an effect on the profit, price, and production of goods and services. The student will understand that resource markets and financial markets determine wages, interest rates, and commodity prices. The student will understand that market failures occur when markets fail to allocate resources efficiently or meet other goals, and this often leads to government attempts to correct the problem.

E.

Macroeconomic concepts. The student will understand that economic performance, the performance of an economy toward meeting its goals, can be measured, and is affected by, various long-term factors. The student will understand that the overall levels of output, employment, and prices in an economy fluctuate in the short run as a result of the spending and production decisions of households, businesses, governments, and others. The student will understand that the overall performance of an economy can be influenced by the fiscal policies of governments and the monetary policies of central banks. The student will understand that international trade, exchange rates, and international institutions affect individuals, organizations, and governments throughout the world.

Subp. 3.

Geography.

A.

Geospatial skills. The student will understand that people use geographic representations and geospatial technologies to acquire, process, and report information within a spatial context. The student will understand that geographic inquiry is a process in which people ask geographic questions and gather, organize, and analyze information to solve problems and plan for the future.

B.

Places and regions. The student will understand that places have physical characteristics, such as climate, topography, and vegetation, and human characteristics, such as culture, population, and political and economic systems. The student will understand that people construct regions to identify, organize, and interpret areas of the Earth's surface, which simplifies the Earth's complexity.

C.

Human systems. The student will understand that the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on the Earth's surface influence human systems, such as cultural, economic, and political systems. The student will understand that geographic factors influence the distribution, functions, growth, and patterns of cities and human settlements. The student will understand that the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of the Earth's cultures influence human systems, such as social, economic, and political systems. The student will understand that processes of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of the Earth's surface.

D.

Human environment interaction. The student will understand that the environment influences human actions; and humans both adapt to and change the environment. The student will understand that the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources changes over time.

Subp. 4.

History.

A.

Historical thinking skills. The student will understand that historical inquiry is a process in which multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence are analyzed to draw conclusions about how and why things happened in the past.

B.

World history. The student will understand that:

(1)

environmental changes and human adaptation enabled human migration from Africa to other regions of the world between 200,000 and 8000 BCE;

(2)

the emergence of domestication and agriculture facilitated the development of complex societies and caused far-reaching social and cultural effects between 8000 and 2000 BCE;

(3)

the development of interregional systems of communication and trade facilitated new forms of social organization and new belief systems between 2000 BCE and 600 CE;

(4)

hemispheric networks intensified as a result of innovations in agriculture, trade across longer distances, the consolidation of belief systems, and the development of new multiethnic empires while diseases and climate change caused sharp, periodic fluctuations in global population between 600 and 1450;

(5)

new connections between the hemispheres resulted in the "Columbian Exchange," new sources and forms of knowledge, development of the first truly global economy, intensification of coerced labor, increasingly complex societies, and shifts in the international balance of power between 1450 and 1750;

(6)

industrialization ushered in widespread population growth and migration, new colonial empires, and revolutionary ideas about government and political power between 1750 and 1922;

(7)

a rapidly evolving world dominated by industrialized powers; scientific and technological progress; profound political, economic, and cultural change; world wars; and widespread violence and unrest produced a half century of crisis and achievement between 1900 and 1950;

(8)

post-World War II geopolitical reorganization produced the Cold War balance of power and new alliances that were based on competing economic and political doctrines between 1950 and 1989; and

(9)

globalization, the spread of capitalism, and the end of the Cold War have shaped a contemporary world still characterized by rapid technological change, dramatic increases in global population, and economic growth coupled with persistent economic and social disparities and cultural conflict between 1989 and the present.

C.

United States history. The student will understand that:

(1)

before European contact, North America was populated by indigenous nations that had developed a wide range of social structures, political systems, and economic activities, and whose expansive trade networks extended across the continent;

(2)

rivalries among European nations and their search for new opportunities fueled expanding global trade networks and, in North America, colonization and settlement and the exploitation of indigenous peoples and lands; colonial development evoked varied responses by indigenous nations, and produced regional societies and economies that included imported slave labor and distinct forms of local government between 1585 and 1763;

(3)

the divergence of colonial interests from those of England led to an independence movement that resulted in the American Revolution and the foundation of a new nation based on the ideals of self-government and liberty between 1754 and 1800;

(4)

economic expansion and the conquest of indigenous and Mexican territory spurred the agricultural and industrial growth of the United States; led to increasing regional, economic, and ethnic divisions; and inspired multiple reform movements between 1792 and 1861;

(5)

regional tensions around economic development, slavery, territorial expansion, and governance resulted in a Civil War and a period of Reconstruction that led to the abolition of slavery, a more powerful federal government, a renewed push into indigenous nations' territory, and continuing conflict over racial relations between 1850 and 1877;

(6)

as the United States shifted from its agrarian roots into an industrial and global power, the rise of big business, urbanization, and immigration led to institutionalized racism, ethnic and class conflict, and new efforts at reform between 1870 and 1920;

(7)

the economic growth, cultural innovation, and political apathy of the 1920s ended in the Great Depression which spurred new forms of government intervention, and renewed labor activism, followed by World War II and an economic resurgence between 1920 and 1945;

(8)

post-World War II United States was shaped by an economic boom, Cold War military engagements, politics and protests, and rights movements to improve the status of racial minorities, women, and America's indigenous peoples between 1945 and 1989; and

(9)

the end of the Cold War, shifting geopolitical dynamics, the intensification of the global economy, and rapidly changing technologies have given renewed urgency to debates about the United States' identity, values, and role in the world between 1980 and the present.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02

History:

37 SR 1643

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018

ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION

3501.1400 SCOPE AND PURPOSE.

The purpose of these standards is to establish statewide standards for physical education that govern instruction of students in kindergarten through grade 12. The state of Minnesota's standards for physical education are the current standards developed by SHAPE America (Society of Health and Physical Educators).

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.021

History:

42 SR 712

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018

3501.1410 PHYSICAL EDUCATION STANDARDS.

Subpart 1.

Application.

Students will meet the physical education standards in subparts 2 to 6.

Subp. 2.

Motor skills.

The student will demonstrate competency in a variety of motor skills and movement patterns.

Subp. 3.

Movement and performance.

The student will apply knowledge of concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics to movement and performance.

Subp. 4.

Physical activity and fitness.

The student will demonstrate the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness.

Subp. 5.

Personal and social behavior.

The student will exhibit responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others.

Subp. 6.

Value of physical activity.

The student will recognize the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction.

Statutory Authority:

MS s 120B.02; 120B.021

History:

42 SR 712

Published Electronically:

January 4, 2018