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Minnesota Legislature

Office of the Revisor of Statutes

8710.4450 TEACHERS OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES.

Subpart 1.

Scope of practice.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences is authorized to provide to students in grades 5 through 12 instruction that is designed to prepare students for family life and the interrelationships between family, community, and work.

Subp. 2.

Licensure requirements.

A candidate for licensure to teach family and consumer sciences to students in grades 5 through 12 shall:

A.

hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is regionally accredited by the association for the accreditation of colleges and secondary schools;

B.

demonstrate the standards for effective practice for licensing of beginning teachers in part 8710.2000; and

C.

show verification of completing a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board preparation program approved under chapter 8705 leading to the licensure of teachers of family and consumer sciences in subpart 3.

Subp. 3.

Subject matter standard.

A candidate for licensure as a teacher of family and consumer sciences must complete a preparation program under subpart 2, item C, that must include the candidate's demonstration of the knowledge and skills in items A to E.

A.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands how the family functions and develops within the home environment. The teacher must understand:

(1)

reciprocal influences between the family and family members to the workplace;

(2)

family structures, functions, relationships, and dynamics;

(3)

parenting as a process through the life cycle;

(4)

physiological, psychological, and social aspects of sexual development throughout the life span;

(5)

management of household and natural resources to achieve personal and family goals including food, clothing, shelter, recreation, transportation, education, and investments;

(6)

the influence of ethics on personal, family, and consumer decisions;

(7)

decision-making models within the context of problem solving in the home environment and the extension to the community;

(8)

the developmental changes of individuals across the life span and ways to meet their corresponding physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and moral development needs;

(9)

how to identify and meet personal and family needs and wants for shelter and clothing to include finding, selecting, and maintaining suitable housing and the role of aesthetics and design in textiles, apparel, and interiors;

(10)

nutrition planning and food preparation, handling, and storage for personal and family safety and well-being; and

(11)

stress factors that affect the family including multigenerational households, family members with special needs, dual careers, economic uncertainty, violence, substance abuse, resolving conflict, and death.

B.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands the interrelatedness of family and community. The teacher must understand:

(1)

the effects of social and technological changes on families;

(2)

value systems within the family and their relationship to social consequences and public policy;

(3)

cultural and ethnic variations in families;

(4)

rights and responsibilities of children, parents or guardians, grandparents, and others;

(5)

variations in parenting practices;

(6)

how to access community resources to solve family problems;

(7)

reciprocal influences of the major social institutions, including governmental and educational, on the family;

(8)

the impact of historical, environmental, and cultural influences on living environments, textiles, and interior design;

(9)

global food sources and their impact on the community; and

(10)

cultural and political aspects of food distribution and consumption.

C.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands career development in related services occupations. As a result of both school-based and work-based learning experiences, the teacher must understand:

(1)

career decision-making process including self-awareness, career research, workplace expectations, career strategies, goal setting, school-to-work transition, and lifelong learning;

(2)

the basic purposes, issues, skills, nature of work, and competencies in one or more of the following related service occupations: Family and Community Support Services; Consumer Resources Management; Early Childhood and Educational Services; Apparel and Textile Design, Manufacturing, and Merchandising; Interior Design and Furnishings; Management and Maintenance of Facilities; Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation; Food Science, Dietetics, and Nutrition; and Food Production Services;

(3)

the impact of consumer practices, laws, global economics, and conservation or recycling on the service occupations;

(4)

uses and influences of technology in related service occupations;

(5)

the impact of interpersonal skills on the work environment; and

(6)

how families contribute to the preparation of family members for the work environment.

D.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences understands the teaching of family and consumer sciences that integrates understanding of family and consumer sciences with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development. The teacher of family and consumer sciences to preadolescent and adolescent students must:

(1)

understand and apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents;

(2)

understand and apply the research base for and the best practices of middle level and high school education;

(3)

develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of family and consumer sciences and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials;

(4)

understand the role and alignment of district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning;

(5)

understand the need for and how to connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities;

(6)

know how to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities;

(7)

understand the role and purpose of cocurricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process;

(8)

understand laboratory management practices and procedures;

(9)

understand the impact of public policy on curriculum;

(10)

know fiscal, budgetary, and purchasing practices for operating a comprehensive family and consumer sciences educational program; and

(11)

know marketing techniques for student recruitment and retention in family and consumer sciences programs.

E.

A teacher of family and consumer sciences must understand the content and methods for teaching reading including:

(1)

knowledge of reading processes and instruction including:

(a)

the relationships between and among print processing abilities and digital content, motivation, background, and discourse knowledge, cognitive abilities, and reader's interest and how those relationships impact comprehension; and

(b)

the complexities involved in the development of academic language and the impact of that development in school success; and

(2)

the ability to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction including:

(a)

selection and implementation of a wide variety of before, during, and after reading comprehension strategies that develop reading and metacognitive abilities;

(b)

the ability to develop and implement effective vocabulary strategies that help students understand words including domain-specific content words; and

(c)

the ability to identify instructional practices, approaches, and methods and match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers, guided by an evidence-based rationale, which support the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of readers; and

(d)

the ability to plan instruction and select strategies that help students read and understand family and consumer science texts, and electronic resources including the ability to:

i.

relate what is read to relevant prior knowledge;

ii.

follow instructions to perform laboratory activities step by step in a disciplined fashion;

iii.

explain diagrams and graphs in terms of scientific content and meaning; and

iv.

explain meaning of abbreviations and symbols.

Subp. 3a.

Student teaching and field experiences.

A candidate for licensure to teach family and consumer sciences must have a broad range of targeted field-based experiences, of a minimum of 100 hours prior to student teaching, that provide opportunities to apply and demonstrate competency of professional dispositions and the required skills and knowledge under this part and part 8710.2000.

Across the combination of student teaching and other field-based placements, candidates must have experiences teaching the content at both the middle level, grades 5 through 8, and high school level, grades 9 through 12.

For initial teacher licensure, the student teaching period must be a minimum of 12 continuous weeks, full time, face-to-face, in which the candidate is supervised by a cooperating teacher, and evaluated at least twice by qualified faculty supervisors in collaboration with the cooperating teachers.

Subp. 4.

Continuing license.

A continuing license shall be issued and renewed according to the rules of the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board governing continuing licensure.

Subp. 5.

[Repealed, L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110]

Statutory Authority:

MS s 122A.09; 122A.18

History:

23 SR 1928; 34 SR 595; L 2015 c 21 art 1 s 110; 39 SR 822; L 2017 1Sp5 art 12 s 22

Published Electronically:

August 21, 2017